Happy Scribe Logo

Transcript

Proofread by 0 readers
Proofread
[00:00:02]

Thanks for listening to the Adam Carolla Show on podcast one. All right, in the first half, we got Donald Trump Jr. calling in for a lengthy and somewhat spirited debate as we discuss the subjects.

[00:00:18]

It's informative, interesting and sometimes funny as well. I got the news coming up as well after that. First, I'll tell you about LifeLock. Nearly 50000 falsified employment claims in Maryland, more than 500 million in claims. And Marilyn isn't alone. Other states are finding similar unemployment fraud. Why wouldn't there be? Everyone's on their computer. Everyone's at home. Everything's traveling electronically. These days, it's important to understand how cyber crime and identity theft are affecting our lives.

[00:00:51]

You're online. You're buying everything online. It's easy to do and it's fine. Now you just need a little insurance. That insurance is LifeLock. LifeLock detects a wide range of identity threats, like your Social Security number for sale on the Dark Web. If they detect your information, they'll send you an alert. Protect yourself with LifeLock, right, Dawson?

[00:01:15]

No. Prevent identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses LifeLock and see threats that you might miss on your own. Join now and save a twenty five percent off your first year by using promo code. Adam, call one 800 LifeLock or to live like Dot.

[00:01:27]

He's promo code onem for 25 percent off. Sports are starting to come back podcast one SportsNet has all the action covered, tons of different sports podcasts, something for everyone. Rich Eisen show, Steve Austin show the Deegan's with metal militia star Brian Deegan. Plus many more tune into all the great podcast with podcast One SportsNet.

[00:01:55]

And from Carawan One Studios in Glendale, California, this is The Adam Carolla Show. Adam's guest today, the director of the last Knaack Tiller, Russell, plus international security specialist Ed Calderon and Donald Trump Jr. And now he hates progressives so much he won't even watch those ads with Flo. Adam Carolla, some of those are pretty funny. I got it funny, she's funny and I trust her. She was a Groundling.

[00:02:34]

Yeah, that's why we're agreeing. I like I like some of those spots. And some of her spinoff spots are kind of funny, too, although there is and we weren't planning on talking about any of this, but there's a weird sometimes they do things that don't make sense. I don't know if we're talking about this one or not, but she has this one scenario where she's like protecting the house and it's like there's a bird in the car just got wash and it's on a branch over the hood, like, don't you dare to do it.

[00:02:59]

But there's also one where the newspaper guy throws the newspaper and she swats it. She rejects it like an NBA center and she goes, get that trash out of here. And I'm like, well, that's their newspaper, though.

[00:03:10]

Yeah, they actively subscribe to that. I mean, they're smart people who work on these campaigns. Again, it's like when I was a when I was a kid and I saw the big billboard for, you know, Bestfoods mayonnaise and there's a huge dollop of it on top of a fruit salad.

[00:03:30]

And I was like, oh, who who do that? Like, show them making a tuna mouth or something. I don't healthy anyway.

[00:03:40]

Specifically, specifically that growing up, I always saw sour cream commercials with the slow strawberry dip and the sour cream.

[00:03:48]

And I've always wondered about that. What what is that. All right.

[00:03:51]

Don't know. Anyway, funny number two, I had a thought and I think it'll work out with what people are talking about. I was watching the Democratic Convention last night. And, you know, we're always kind of talking about in this time we're in where there's a chasm between the haves and the have nots. And, you know, some people are really, really crushing it out there. And then other people are barely getting by. And the you know, the rich keep getting richer and the poor keep getting poorer.

[00:04:26]

If you watch enough episodes of good times from the early 70s, you realize the theme of the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer, has been around for 50 years now. But I was looking at it and I was like, yeah. And it's, you know, it's always true. The guy in the corner office makes thousand times more than the guy on the factory floor and all that. But I was thinking I was thinking, well, how does this really pertain to me and what have I figured out or what have I done, or am I the rich guy or the poor guy or how did that work?

[00:04:59]

And I figured if you're the poor guy, I know how to of the wealth has gone along the lines of this the narrative for the last 50 years.

[00:05:09]

Well, I realized that I of course, I grew up poor, but when I got out of high school and I started getting out into the workplace, people forget it was like the go go 80s, like it was Miami Vice guys driving Ferraris, cocaine, cocaine was popular. Cocaine was as popular as it was, not because it was scrubbed delicious. But part of it was it was one hundred and twenty dollars a gram. And anyone in a gram of cocaine was, you know, taking two walnuts and crushing them up worth a powder like it was nothing.

[00:05:50]

And so it was a status symbol like that, a symbol. Certain circles. You know, when the guy came into the party, it's like, hey, man, I like rich guy with the cocaine, rich guy with the blazer in the Ferrari and the whole the whole era. It was a real opulent kind of time. Like now, as I've said, like Leonardo DiCaprio drives a Prius and wears flip flops and cargo shorts and now he's on Geffen's yacht when you're not looking, but he's living his outward appearances is everyone just goes to Old Navy, buy shorts and flip flops.

[00:06:21]

You have no idea who Mark Zuckerberg was if you saw him walking down the street. Right. I mean, by how he was dressed. Or what he was. You went to college with him, right? OK, so I grew up and when I got out, it was like mid 80s and it was kind of the height of, like the money and the cocaine and the clash and the guys trashiness that guys uptown, man, look at that.

[00:06:46]

He's wearing Armani suit. Even Sly Stallone started wearing like Armani suits with gold tie clips and stuff like that guy wearing rings and big stud gold. There were like nugget gold watches and stuff like it was very opulent. Just think about the Armani suit like the well-dressed man, the oversized top Armani suit.

[00:07:09]

Right.

[00:07:09]

And I was sitting around making seven dollars an hour for cleaning garbage on a construction site. And it was also sushi. Sushi is the cocaine of food.

[00:07:23]

It's like, yeah, it it's a Trader Joe's now prepackaged and ready to go for four dollars. Back then, going out to sushi was like, oh my God, it's one hundred and forty dollars. And that meant two days of work on a construction site to go out and eat sushi. And if you were even in a circle who had heard of sushi and knew that it was available. Right.

[00:07:43]

So that was an early generational divide between you and me. Adam was when you observed how poor I was screening calls like you eat sushi, you eat sushi.

[00:07:51]

I'm like, yeah, it's five dollars a Trader Joe's.

[00:07:54]

Yeah, it was it was one of those things, like for a short period of time, the conventional TV versus the flat panel TV would divide the rich and the poor, you know, or central air or something like that. So I grew up, so I started thinking about myself and it's like, oh, I was the poorest. Living in Los Angeles and I wasn't in Omaha, I was in Los Angeles, I've lived in Los Angeles, we knew like there are celebrities, Todd Bridges has a turbo Porsche and he's driving it to Palm Springs.

[00:08:31]

You know, like it was like I knew this will never end for.

[00:08:35]

Right. Such a mad was going to ride that horse and it's a rocket sled ride to the moon.

[00:08:41]

So I was very poor when people knew it. You know, I'm driving a pickup truck. That's a beater. People are driving BMW and call them Beamer's, you know what I mean? And all the is all you need to know is watch some of those MD 80s, late 80s movie and you see the rich guy calling his girl Muffie and they're going to a country club. You know, people go to a country club, the rich. And I was making seven dollars an hour digging ditches.

[00:09:09]

So I was like, man, it's going to be tough to fit in with this group. And also, when you're trying to attract the ladies, it's not fantastic. Ladies traditionally like money and security, but again, they can't spot it from outer space because, again, when everyone's wearing the board shorts and the flip flops and how do we know the difference between Mark Zuckerberg and the poor guy? But you knew it with the Armani suits and the BMW and all that stuff.

[00:09:36]

Anyway, did you ever think in the 80s there would be a meme that was homeless or hipster? I mean, that's literally where we're at. So as Gordon Gekko was right.

[00:09:47]

So when I started but then I started thinking about it as I started hearing a lot of the haves and have nots and, you know, all that. And I thought, how did I process it? You know, what did I think? And I never thought for a second I have to figure out a way to bend society my direction. Like I never really thought about society or bending at my direction. I thought about what can I do to get out of this, like to get paid more to move my way up the construction site.

[00:10:21]

At the time, I just needed to get from a glorified Gompa, the guy who was picking up garbage on a construction site to the rough carpenter, which would get me from, you know, seven dollars an hour to maybe twelve dollars an hour. So that was always the plan. But I never had a thought about, like, what is the government going to do? And like, how are they going to change it to sort of help my lot in life?

[00:10:48]

I maybe I was naive. Maybe it's low self-esteem, maybe it's my horrible family, but I never gave it an ounce of thought or energy. I was just like, I that guy's got a BMW. I'm driving an Isuzu pickup truck or Mazda pickup truck. At the time, I would like to figure out a way to get a BMW. And I think I would enjoy myself more with air conditioning in my BMW than I would with vice grips to roll up my crank windows because the handles busted off and my Mazda.

[00:11:19]

And I think I don't think anyone else is going to get me from the Mazda to the BMW. I couldn't see society politicians, certainly my own family members. I couldn't see any anybody doing this except for me. I think that will be the only path that I can follow. And so I was sort of lucky enough to think that way, because if I thought about it and I went, what the hell is the government going to do to fix this?

[00:11:49]

Or what's my local politician going to do to fix it or even a family member? And that's probably where I got the message because I was lucky enough to get the message, which is if your mom and your dad aren't going to fix anything, then why do you think the guy in Sacramento is going to fix something right there on your side is true?

[00:12:08]

But also because I don't know, just because a smidge of an age difference, we're politicians pandering to you at a time. No, they weren't.

[00:12:17]

They were like, you know, they were talking about taxes and they were talking about crime and that that kind of stuff, the big the big tent stuff, they weren't there weren't there, weren't doing anything about me or individuals.

[00:12:32]

There was no boxers or briefs conversation. There was no saxophone on TV.

[00:12:36]

No, they they were intentionally trying not to be human. Like, that's how they that's how they were. That's how football coaches were, you know what I mean. Like of the football coaches weren't supposed to be your buddy. They're supposed to be just that. Mr. Gallagher. Even dare even think about their first name. That's interesting.

[00:12:54]

Is not every politician, of course, but like Ronald Reagan was of that era and that was his gift to us. He wasn't you know what in human, he was an actor and he was the great communicator. And he was, you know, telegenic. He wasn't.

[00:13:05]

But he wasn't focused on. You were going to laugh. Yeah, exactly. No. And he wasn't trying to sort of anger me and agitate me and make me wonder why that guy in the BMW got that BMW on. I didn't get that BMW, and he certainly wasn't explaining that the way for me to get a BMW is to get that guy to give me a BMW that was not in the car. The deal was it's funny. It's funny.

[00:13:30]

It was such a vacuum of promises, but it was just like a lot of they would argue over stuff like English in school and proposition, whatever, you know, add 40 cents to a pack of cigarettes, tax time, some little transportation, add some new buses or something a little barely any with the police. So the police reform or the cops. Yeah.

[00:13:51]

Imagine English being taught in schools as a wedge issue now, at least in California, that that dustup assailed there is that there was not only when they talk there, they weren't talk about reimagining policing. Daryl Gates, our police chief, was outfitting military equipment, was battering rams so it could it could bust into crack houses with one, you know, one one plunger, the accelerator pedal. But I was poor. It seemed like society was thriving around me.

[00:14:25]

And BMW was in Armani suits and cocaine and discos and country clubs. And of course, every Rob Lowe movie had the rich person in it. And and I and I was aware of it. I was also aware that it had nothing to do with me and that I was also aware that I wanted to not be rich, but I wanted to be successful. I wanted to have air conditioning and and not fear that my tools were going to get stolen every night from my truck when I was parked in front of my apartment, all that kind of stuff.

[00:14:56]

I wanted like insurance. And I went to air conditioning, but I never thought anyone was going to do it for me. And no politician ever even discussed it. And I certainly never would have raised my hand at a town hall and asked what they were going to do for me. I sort of knew, you know, when I tried to sign up to be a fireman and they told me I had to wait for a while because because I was a white guy, I sort of got which way the wind was blowing.

[00:15:19]

Like, I don't think anyone's going to do anything. And and it benefited me is what I'm saying. It made me go, all right, I've got to go make some hay while the sun shines and I'll do it. I'll do it. Myself and the politicians constantly explain what they're going to do for everyone and explaining why you should be angry that it's not being done in perpetuity, like it just goes on this administration, the last administration, the next administration, one more long punch list that never.

[00:15:49]

It's a punch list, you know, when you finish a house and you're done with the house, you end up with this punch list and the punch list. And I've gone to finished houses and taken care of the punch list. The punch list is, oh, the bathroom, the baseboard in the bathroom. You need to call the top of it where it hits the wall. And then in the kitchen there still you have to put the sealer on the ground.

[00:16:14]

It's grouted. It needs to be sealed and spun and you just go through it and eventually get to the bottom of the punch list and you announce the house is done and you leave. I would argue that we're creating an endless punch list that is never going to be resolved or finished.

[00:16:30]

Oh, it keeps extending. And also sort of. Yeah, also stuff on the punch list. Like we we need equality, you know what I mean? It's it's very, you know, intangible. It's kind of endless to what your version of equality is in 2020 and what the initial people in the 60s were calling equality. Yes. Sorry. Yeah.

[00:16:53]

It reminds me of sort of the big reveal at the end of so many sci fi movies, maybe sci fi horror movies, where the reveal is always the same. It's we didn't need this to begin with. It's a lie. They were lying to the people. You know, we don't really need to still be on this train and Snowpiercer. We don't need to be, you know, City of Ember is we don't really need all that coal. It's just to keep the people sort of sedated and waiting and waiting and waiting.

[00:17:18]

And I think that's why movies like that resonate with so many of us, because that's that's kind of how it feels.

[00:17:23]

Donald Trump junior. Donald Trump, junior. Forty two on the on Holder or piped up here.

[00:17:31]

We're going to bring it in now. He's got a new book which is called The Liberal Privilege, and we'll talk to him about that. But I have some other questions for Donald Jr. as well. Hey, Donald Jr., good to see you.

[00:17:44]

Good to see you. How's it going, Adam? Good.

[00:17:46]

Say hi to Paul, Brian and Gina Grande.

[00:17:50]

Brian, how are you going? Hi there. I'll start off with an out of the box question for you that you're uniquely qualified to answer. I was I was informed yesterday that I was going to interview your father at the White House in about a week's time. And and I thought to myself, by the way, just so you know how my family rolls, I said to my twin 14 year old son, I'm going to interview the president of the United States because can I go?

[00:18:24]

And I said to my daughter, You want to go? And she goes, No way. So that's kind of a little microcosm of our country inside of my home. It's not a brand.

[00:18:32]

It happens. It happens. But I thought to myself, I never had them. I know. I mean, it's literally taking place in my living room. But I thought to myself, and this may be insulting, so I want to run it past you first.

[00:18:47]

Oh, what could go wrong? What could go wrong? No, my from a national security situation, my feeling is, is I and you suffer from the same thing. I know you, I've interviewed you. I get I get that you love the outdoors and camping and hunting. And I, we talked about your time in Colorado and all that stuff. You feel like a real person to me. But to many Americans, it's you're a cartoon character.

[00:19:12]

Right. And I think it's safe to say that your father has been made into a cartoon character as well through the eyes of maybe half the country. Fine. My feeling was, is like when I'm interviewing people that I feel have been made into that character, I feel like I want to humanize them. Like I want to talk to them about stuff, not necessarily policy, but like, tell me about your past. Tell me tell me about your schedule.

[00:19:38]

Tell me what shows you like. You know you know what I'm saying. Like a more human approach to an interview. Does that makes sense?

[00:19:45]

I do. I think I see where you're going. I mean, you're sort of asking what you sort of be able to ask him about to sort of get some of that.

[00:19:53]

Yeah. Like the first thing that popped in my head is I don't know what his schedule is like. Everyone says he sleeps four hours a night. Does that mean he goes to bed at midnight and wakes up at four? Like, what does that has that?

[00:20:04]

I think it's just not a lot of consecutive sleep. So he's either up or he's always up early. He's always been that way. I sort of remember it was it was sort of funny. And I don't think he'd remember this, but I remember coming out of college and just starting to work. And you're in the real world and you know, your early 20s, you're going out on a Saturday night and having fun. And I get this phone call at like five a.m. It's like Dawn, it's dad, why are you in the office?

[00:20:28]

You know, and me being the smart ass that I am, I'm like, why are you in the office? And the response was, I'm in the office. That's why I know that you're not here.

[00:20:37]

And I'm like, that's all it is. It's like a Saturday morning recovery. And he's calling me from the office. But I think if you if you want to sort of see the. Sort of as it relates to sort of America and maybe understand how he's sort of been able to relate to ask him about sports, the guy's an encyclopedia. I mean, he'll remember every fight there ever was, football, baseball. And it's he's an encyclopedia. I think you guys probably have that in common.

[00:21:04]

And maybe a couple construction questions sprinkled in.

[00:21:09]

Yeah, well, listen, you know, no one's built more than him, so he gets that. Everyone always talks about him as a business guy. But the real reality is the builder. It'd be nice to see some of the Democrats work together so we could do infrastructure stuff. Now, put Americans back to work. You know, that's his wheelhouse. And I think that's what he'd be looking to do for the next, you know, the next term.

[00:21:30]

Well, what's your read on all this that's going on?

[00:21:33]

Like you read polls, you hear about the polls, you hear President Trump is behind, although I feel like making up some ground in some polls. But then as we learn from the last election, maybe the polls aren't as accurate and maybe uniquely inaccurate with your father because people don't report accurately. I don't know what's your head.

[00:21:57]

Yeah. You know, I sort of think we're going to see a redo of 16, right? I mean, in 16, it was sort of funny. You know, we did online polling and we did regular conventional telephone polling. Right. And you would think when you go to a large enough sample set, statistics tells you you should end up at basically the same result. And in these large sample sites, 10000 plus, we got 15 percent better online when people were by themselves like they would be in a voting booth.

[00:22:23]

It's just, you know, it's going to be our dirty little secret. We're just going to vote for Trump and not tell anyone. And I think when you have the climate that you have today, you see what's going on around the country. And, you know, conservatives are getting beaten up in the streets. I just don't think that someone's going to tell you know, there's plenty of people who, you know, wearing a mask. I had a sweatshirt, you know, that will be happily tell you.

[00:22:41]

But I think there's a big percentage of people that are just going to be like, you know what, I'm for this guy. He's a politician that actually delivered for me. He actually fulfilled the promises that he made on the campaign in 2016, which, you know, you wouldn't think wouldn't be an anomaly. But in our political system, it is meaning we tell people what you want to hear. I mean, Joe Biden's talking about rebuilding America.

[00:23:02]

He's going to do X, Y, Z and say, hey, Joe, I mean, you've been in Washington, D.C. for 50 years, half a century now.

[00:23:11]

Now you're going to start rebuilding things. I mean, if Joe Biden knew how to fix anything, why didn't you tell Obama, Brian? Did he do it? Sorry, Brian, you have a question.

[00:23:19]

I had a follow up question about that very topic. I wondered on this very show four years ago, naively, how like how could the polls have gotten wrong and why people theorize that, oh, Trump supporters didn't want to be honest with the pollsters. And I would think to myself, why, why? Why would you not want to be honest, just this anonymous person who doesn't know you? Why do you think do you agree with that, first of all?

[00:23:43]

And why do you think that is amongst his supporters?

[00:23:46]

I do. You've sort of seen, you know, cancel culture only goes one way. Adam, I know you've spoken a lot, obviously, with Dennis Prager and stuff about sort of the suppression of conservative thought to cancel culture and the things that happen to conservatives. And, you know, it only happens one way if you're a conservative and you support Trump, you can get your business boycotted. You can get your sign in your yard signs stolen, you can get your house destroyed.

[00:24:09]

It doesn't happen the other way because conservatives are live and let live. So if we disagree on something, you know, that's fine. That's your prerogative. The left has weaponized that. So I just don't think that people at all, certainly not all people, are going to be apt to tell some stranger on the phone that they're voting for Trump, even if they're going to, because they don't want to be lectured about nonsense that we've seen peddled from the other side.

[00:24:32]

Looks like, you know. By anyone, they just the problem is they don't know where the person is coming from, you know, the amount of sort of it's that whisper vote, you know, they'll talk about their friends. I know people that have said, hey, man, like I didn't even realize that I voted for Trump. I didn't even tell my wife because I was worried what she was going to do. And it turns out she voted for Trump, too.

[00:24:50]

And it was like it's it's amazing that because they vilified conservatives so much and certainly conservatives like Trump were outspoken who will actually fight not just sort of say the stuff on the stump, but actually try to effectuate those policies in D.C. It happens. It's a very real phenomenon.

[00:25:07]

Well, I'll give you a real world example, because, you know, a lot of stuff we talk about polls and stuff can be tough to sort of wrap your head around. But like I said, I'm I have an ongoing experiment in my home, which is I have 14 year old twins and one of them loves Trump and the other one hates Trump. And we don't talk to the one who hates Trump about being careful and kind of minding their P's and Q's like be careful what you say in a classroom or in a situation or amongst us.

[00:25:42]

Whatever natality gets no coaching. Sonny does get a lot of be careful what you say and where you say it because you can turn a group against it. Now, I live in California and maybe if I lived in Montana, we'd be flipping the script. I don't know.

[00:26:00]

But I lived a pretty conservative neighborhood and he still kind of gets the speech of watch, keep your mouth shut. Sorry, listen, even in Montana, even in Texas, even in places that run conservative, again, you know, conservatives aren't going after someone for having an opposing view. They'll have that argument. That's why people have said to me, and I'm sure they said it to you, as, you know, the stuff you've done with Dennis.

[00:26:24]

Well, why don't you start conservative Twitter? It's like I don't want conservative Twitter. I don't want to be in an echo chamber. I actually want to compare my ideas with others. And may the best idea in I just don't want to be on that platform where if I built my platform over 10, 15 years on a platform, someone with three followers actually is getting boosted. And I'm penalized and I'm on an uneven playing field. That's ridiculous.

[00:26:49]

And that's what's happened across the board.

[00:26:51]

Brian, quick follow up about him. Only because, Don, you meant you Don or Donald or Don. I Don. You mentioned cancer culture, and I'm glad you brought that up because you put on Facebook back in April, quote, Cancer culture is horrifying. I agree with you. And I think everyone on this show right now agrees with your cancer culture is terrible, like the idea that you would have this retribution or this revenge against someone who had, like, a different opinion than it was is abhorrent.

[00:27:19]

And that's that's a bad part of our culture. How are your dad made news today with the Goodyear thing? Because they had what turned out to be not exactly right, but a policy you didn't agree with, and he called for a boycott. It strikes me that maybe your dad is is the tip of the spear of this cancer culture. And I know that it's much more widespread amongst a different group. But how do you reconcile those two things?

[00:27:41]

Because this is literally like know retribution for having a policy or opinion that is different that I don't agree with?

[00:27:49]

Well, it's not really an opinion that's different. Don't forget they said, hey, if you want to wear a BLM shirt, which is a Marxist organization, no one's arguing against the concept of Black Lives Matter. That's ridiculous. Of course they matter.

[00:28:01]

But BLM as itself as an anarchist at this point, Marxist organization in their own credo, it's OK for you to be a BLM supporter, but if you're a Trump supporter, you can't show up at work. If I show up at Umaga hat, I risk getting fired. If someone else shows up in a BLM shirt and I complain about it, I'll probably get fired. So it's not fair. So the reality is this and I get with your point, because I do see the hypocrisy, but at a certain point when it has been so lopsided, conservatives just have to fight back.

[00:28:31]

We have to start playing the game the way the other side is. Every day you read about another business that's being boycotted, another business that's being canceled. It's always the conservative business that's canceled. Honestly, at this point, if they're going to keep doing it and they're not going to change, maybe we just have to play their own game because unfortunately, the general mantra of conservatism, of live and let live, it hasn't gotten us anywhere in 50 years.

[00:28:55]

We've been live and let live. While the other side has trampled over those things. They have taken over academia, they've taken over education. We say, oh, let's live and let live. It hasn't worked. So the reality is, as long as that other side is doing that, you're almost going to have to combat it. Otherwise, you're going to keep ceding ground as they've done for five decades in my head on.

[00:29:13]

It is. And then Gina has a follow up as well. My head on it is if you're running a company like Goodyear or could be any company, could be Michelin, could become a Hobby Lobby, I don't see a difference.

[00:29:24]

Like if Hobby Lobby doesn't want to provide birth control, does that don't work for them? That's their policy.

[00:29:31]

Well, I don't think it's quite the same thing with saying you can wear this or I won't provide that. They'll provide birth control, but not this kind of birth control. So it's a little it's a little more nuanced.

[00:29:45]

But what I'm saying is a religious exemption. The others total politics. Well, all right. So one's religious. All right. So what I'm saying is, is this I feel like if I have a policy and my policy is wear whatever you want, then that's fine. Or my policy could be I don't want anything that has the perception of a political message to it. So no black lives matter and no magga hats. But my problem comes and I don't know if this is true, but if the company then is sort of yes to Black Lives Matter but no to Magga hats, it's still their company.

[00:30:24]

It's still their prerogative. But to me now, you're kind of you're now deciding you're now making a political statement, which I guess is your prerogative as well. It seemed to me that either wear whatever you want or we don't. We have a policy of no of of no political oriented garb that that seems consistent.

[00:30:49]

But your company and you can do what you want. Yes.

[00:30:52]

What I do is I'd ask you, what do you think would happen to Goodyear or any other company today if they said there's no BLM gear allowed, but you're allowed to wear Monahan's if they put out a letter to all of their employees, the opposite letter of what they've put out, where they reversed. The sort of politics and said, we forbid you from showing up in a blue shirt, but we're OK with you showing up in a magazine. What do you think would happen, guys?

[00:31:18]

I think it would be pretty. Wouldn't it be bad? The Internet would melt down.

[00:31:25]

Yes, it would. The media would be talking about it for weeks and months on end. That's what I'm saying. It only goes one way, generally speaking. So, you know, again, I agree with I don't like Kelsall. Oh, I don't I don't want part of our society, but as long as the other side continues to do this, they continue to push that, they jam it down our throats. Eventually you actually have to fight back, guys.

[00:31:50]

You can't just roll over and die because the other side would like to do and they've sort of taken advantage of our general propensity to do that. Gina, you had a question.

[00:31:58]

A question. Yeah. Specifically about that, because I take your point for sure in terms of, you know, companies and things on this broad spectrum and, frankly, polite society. Point well taken. And I can, of course, only speak to this specifically because of my gender and and all that.

[00:32:16]

But I do notice when it comes to Twitter, when it comes to social media, there are certain mobs that are vicious to women, vicious, brutal, terrifying to some.

[00:32:30]

And, you know, if you go and you click on their page, the only thing now, the first thing, but the only thing you see is a mug, a symbol and an American flag, as though that's been a co-opted symbol that we all can't share because we're all happy to be here. So is there any way you could sort of speak to that? And I know would you have any anything to say to people who think that that's the way to go about political discourse?

[00:32:53]

Well, listen, I think a lot of that stuff is done. You see that, you know, sort of the anarchist showing up wearing biker gear to make it look like it's actually, you know, mugging people when it's not. So I do believe there's a lot of smoke and mirrors. I mean, no one is around more people than me, probably.

[00:33:08]

I just want to travel around again, like I said, on social media where everyone can pretend to be something they're not. So, you know, I don't know if that's real or if it's not. I follow most of the big Málaga accounts. They follow me. And I have not seen any of that, frankly.

[00:33:23]

But I'm not a big account for the individual.

[00:33:27]

You know, that that person is really a major supporter.

[00:33:30]

I don't know what they really are. I don't know what they really are. But I know what they're saying. I know I know how they're attacking and I know how they're dehumanizing, but I don't know who they are. Correct.

[00:33:39]

So my my point is that I know I know what they're showing. I know what they're showing on social media.

[00:33:45]

Correct. But they could be a leftist pretending to be a vulgar person to give those people a bad name just as easily as anything. That's the problem. I mean, I can put up a tweet right now and in five seconds before someone could read the tweet, there'll be 30 comments tearing me down. Trust me, no one's taking more heat on social media probably than me because I am willing to engage and put myself out there. So before they could read a tweet, they'll be thirty negative tweets that are bots set up to respond to me, to be able to distract from the message, to stop people from seeing that and populating a popular response to a tweet that gets a lot of looking.

[00:34:18]

Again, if we're talking social media, how many liberals and I mean radical liberals, have you ever heard of getting thrown off social media? Yeah, I, I can't. I don't know. Yeah.

[00:34:28]

And how many how many conservatives have you heard about getting thrown off. And I don't mean conservatives that are doing really bad things. I mean conservatives that are just speaking common sense, conservative vernacular, putting it out there because I know Adam you've seen it. I sure know that Dennis Prager and Prager U. Has been thrown off numerous times. They've been censored, they've been demagnetized. But leftist organizations are frankly pushed and built up. So, you know, the social media platform, well, while it may be real, what you're seeing, I don't see it.

[00:35:00]

I'm as involved on our side as anyone. I've been the one that was I've been thrown off Twitter. I was thrown off Twitter ten days ago.

[00:35:08]

Well, and to your point, I'm not I'm not even taking a side. I'm just saying gender specifically. And let's say that you're ninety nine point nine percent. Right.

[00:35:16]

And these are all created by leftist anarchists.

[00:35:21]

If there's one guy out there who truly believes in the message and may be distorting the message and thinks the best way to go about it is to attack and terrify women. Do you have anything to say to somebody like that?

[00:35:32]

He disagrees with you, doesn't exist. That was my question. No, it doesn't. It does not exist.

[00:35:39]

I think the problem what do you want to see? Real chauvinism. Look at look at a post that my sister puts up. OK, Ivanka, who's an incredibly articulate, incredibly intelligent woman, very accomplished in life, got to watch what the leftists say to her when she makes a post.

[00:35:53]

I think of a favorite do it because it's not it's not her weight street. I follow her.

[00:35:58]

I'm trying not to be rich. I don't mean to be a douche, Gina, but what I'm saying is, is worth way too much on both sides where there is like an example of this are an example of that.

[00:36:09]

You know, I've always kind of felt that way where it's like I want school choice. I think parents should stay together. I think parents should raise their kids. I know a single mother who has a son who's a doctor in the Navy now. And I always go, yes, OK, it is. I mean, it's like there's always going to be there's always the outliers. There's there's definitely a fucking horrible person on the right and there's a horrible person on the left.

[00:36:33]

And they're doing things that no sane person who is either on the right or on the left can down. And I always think it's folly going down that road unless it's a large group. Yes, sir. I hate all horrible people equally and whether they're right or left, I think we can all agree on.

[00:36:52]

So, yeah, we can. I mean, I'm not I'm not trying to cut you off or be douchy. But what I'm saying is it's like there's so many people and there's so many examples of so many bad actors right and left, that it's unless it gets to a point where it's a sort of a majority or even a small minority that actually gets into some double digits and stuff like that, I'm just going to keep walking because there's so many examples on both sides.

[00:37:20]

I wanted to get your take, Don Junior. I'll play a tape that I was sitting with Mark Geragos attorney Mark Geragos is a very interesting guy because he's he's very he's he's a Democrat, but he's he's ripped shit pissed that the governor and Buddy Rich just he's read he's rip shit at the mayor and the governor of California and hates them both and has been banned from going on CNN. So he's kind of finding himself in this weird zone of being.

[00:37:57]

You know, he's he's he's he's a he's a soldier without a country, essentially. He's a rich, drunk soldier without a country. But I was talking to him in the last year in December. We're doing our podcast together. And it was December six of last year. So it feels like a long time ago. And I started saying to him, my theory with the upcoming election is the chaos theory.

[00:38:28]

I think the folks that would like to win and not see a second term for President Trump are going to talk a little less about specific plans and more about a general chaos that we want to end. And this is again, December last year. We'll play the clip. My theory of what the Democrats are doing, it's sort of a chaos theory. And then you carry the chaos into the eve of the election and you get some Biden or some footage or some type going.

[00:39:03]

Don't you just want it to end?

[00:39:05]

So that was my theory last year. And then I was watching the the convention. And I think I just grabbed a couple shots of various people, I think Michelle Obama and Bill Clinton and stuff. And I started hearing the word chaos coming up a lot like don't you want the chaos to end? And I will play a couple clips that we pulled.

[00:39:25]

But I started thinking, oh, I think that's the strategy, the chaos theory, because whenever we look to this White House for some leadership or consolation or any semblance of steadiness, what we get instead is chaos. If we have any hope of ending this chaos, we have got to vote for Joe Biden like our lives depend on it.

[00:39:50]

At a time like this, the Oval Office should be a command center instead of a storm center. There's only chaos. So I started hearing the word chaos a lot and wondered, is that a strategy? Well, obviously, I was thinking about it in December of last year and I was thinking that would be a pretty pre pandemic thoughts. But the chaos theory would work nicely going into the election. Hard to imagine a world is prepared. Yeah, I know.

[00:40:21]

Yeah. Well, you know, the irony of tuning out Bill Clinton to talk about the sanctity of the Oval Office, this is pretty amazing, even by Democrats standards today. But there's no question that they would try to do that. But don't forget, so much of the chaos that they're supposedly talking about is literally has been created by the Democrats for the first time in two hundred and forty something years. There was a non peaceful transition of power where the prior administration literally tried to set up the incoming administration had, let's say, George Bush done that to incoming President Barack Obama.

[00:40:53]

The media would be all over it. It would be the largest political scandal in American history. Now that they realized that that seems to be what happened now that FBI agents are going to jail and pleading guilty literally today for altering e-mails of Trump campaign associates to push their point and to push their narrative and to push their hoax. You know, now the media has no interest. So, you know, this notion of chaos is sort of interesting when you look at the failed bite in the Obama administration, you look at their economic output, the things that they were able to accomplish was just nothing.

[00:41:28]

Donald Trump, there was not a single economic metric where we weren't better off under the Trump administration, certainly prior to it. And honestly, if you look at many of the metrics, even now during a global pandemic, you're still better off than you look to the you want to see chaos. What do you think happens to the middle class? When Joe Biden instituted the Biden Sanders joint unity plan, taxing the American middle class, four trillion dollars.

[00:41:52]

So you have the privilege, the absolute privilege of paying for a free health care and education for illegals. Now, you don't have the privilege of getting that for yourself, but you can pay for it for others. I mean, give me a break. The reality is this. If Joe Biden could fix anything, I think he would have done it by now.

[00:42:08]

Do are you in the White House right now? Are somewhere around there? No, I'm just at my place.

[00:42:13]

I'm being allowed there without a tie. Come on. OK. I actually I almost never wear a tie, but that's not my thing. Are you going to be there for special occasions? Maybe if I'm at the White House, but now I'm usually not. I'm just trying to figure out how food works over there.

[00:42:28]

Donald Trump. And I'll come down and cater it for you guys. I don't want you to go hungry during the interview. I bring you some coffee. It won't be good.

[00:42:36]

Me boy, if I could get your dad to do a shot, a fireball with me, I think we'd blow up the Internet.

[00:42:43]

That would be fun. Liberal privilege is the name of the book. It'll be out September 1st. You can preorder it now at Don Junior dot com. Good to speak to you again, Don. Thanks for bringing it. And thanks to Jean and Brian for getting some good points across as well. I enjoy it.

[00:43:02]

I appreciate you answering the questions honestly and being forthcoming in a spirited conversation.

[00:43:09]

Thanks. Listen, I you know, I when you when they spent three years trying to throw me in jail, I may go a little hot or out of the box that most people and probably a little bit, you know, high strung for that. But, you know, it's all in good fun. Thank you, guys. This is great being with you.

[00:43:21]

Thanks. Take care. Thanks. Yeah, I like the like I said, I always felt like a lot of these guys that are turned into sort of cartoon characters, even Dennis Prager suffers from this. Like when you get to know these guys, they're nothing like what the media sort of creates them to be sometimes even good or bad, but mostly bad.

[00:43:42]

And I like the idea that although there's disagreements with that, guys like Don Junior, once you get to talk to them for a little bit, he comes across as a human being.

[00:43:53]

I appreciate, you know, ask him a challenging question. I appreciate Knoller's like there's a bit of hypocrisy there, but and then he gave his side of the story.

[00:44:00]

So, yeah, I want to see is all I'm looking for. I like that, too. All right. Oh, we got we got our Geico road trip story. Is that what's first up, Gina? I know I will get to you in a sense, because I know you went on a road trip that was awesome segment sponsored today by Friends at the Geico. Let's take a drive with Geico Summers. Perfect time for that. Atteya, especially when it's hot in the hubs of hell outside.

[00:44:26]

And I got the ventilated seats and I crank up the air and I actually find myself circling places. I'm going to just so I can have the fresh cold air blowing on me. One of my favorite drives is a drive that Gina made recently. What was that drive, Gina?

[00:44:42]

Oh, it was beautiful. It was. We went to Big Bear. It was the the the well, he was the four year old. Now he's the five year old's birthday and he's never been to a mountain. He's never seen a lake. And he wanted a themed birthday party with just the three of us.

[00:44:56]

So it was a but day party at my. Happy birthday gift buts are now hilarious. So everything was great. Wow, you guys take pot committed to this, but I would have talked him out of it and started to work an elbow angle or something, but he went full blast. And you guys went as pot committed today once but got him.

[00:45:23]

But shorts but decorations we all were are happy. But those shirts for picture he insisted on wearing his to wear. So we drove up there.

[00:45:33]

It was a beautiful drive. You know, it took maybe there is a lot of heat. We made little.

[00:45:39]

But the glasses form looks like see I got bad news.

[00:45:46]

Oh. To get a picture. See, Max had a little right there on the keyboards.

[00:45:58]

So you're absolutely right. We went up there and I warned him because, you know, he's never been and he kept asking me about, you know, what are we going to see the jungle? And I said, once we get to the bottom of the mountain, that's the halfway point. So don't get too squirmy. So we're driving up the mountain and it takes, you know, a good hour or more to get up into Big Bear City.

[00:46:20]

It was his eyes were just so wide. His mouth was so wide. We took some pictures on the turnouts. And the second we got there, because the heat was at 114 at the bottom of the mountain, by the time we got to Big Bear, it was seventy one oh, sprinkling rain. We opened up the sunroof.

[00:46:39]

We open the windows. Everyone's just letting the rain just wash over them. It was cool and beautiful, rustic. It was beautiful. You could just cycle through because I'm not sure what pictures you have.

[00:46:49]

He threw rocks in a lake like he was OPIS. And it was just it was an absolutely beautiful weekend. He he was just mesmerized by all of it. So then, you know, the weekend trip was over. We strapped him into his car seat. We listen. We all like the same music, which is he likes Dolly.

[00:47:09]

Oh, yeah. He likes old country. He likes pop. And we drove back in the drive back was easy because you know what I realized when you go, why does it feel like it takes so much less time to get home? Because when you're going somewhere you're not used to, you're not there until you get to the cabin door. But once you start seeing L.A. city limits, you're like, oh, we're home. That was fast. So it's kind of just a perspective thing.

[00:47:31]

And it was just we had a great time in the car.

[00:47:33]

And I told you it was a long trip down the mountain because there was some construction. I said, you know what, we're in a modern car. We got music, we're having fun. You got your activity book. I'm talking to Andy and we have our air crankin. And we just we enjoyed the trip.

[00:47:48]

The modern car, the creature comforts. Oh, you can't beat it.

[00:47:52]

All right. Well, that was brought to you by our friends at Geico, so you could just go to Guy. Could I come and get a quote to see how much you could be saving today when you visit Geico Dotcom?

[00:48:04]

Oh, right. Not two pictures of the boy we're looking at, see, and the boy with the bucket on, yeah, the could call it the pink shirt and the ball, whoever was telling.

[00:48:20]

Yeah. I can't speak to my fiancee, but you made my day with this comparison. That is a I. I don't really know how my brain works, but I see things and everything reminds me of something. So I, I, I rarely just see new images and have no thoughts. I see, you know, what I do is I try to connect everything to everything. So it's interesting.

[00:48:45]

So good. I've always said the best, the best quality that Jimmy Kimmel has is he's always saying if he meets you, he'll go, oh, you're going to love this guy. And he puts you two together like that's what we do. I don't do that. But when I well, I do it emotionally. Like, if I see a photograph of something, I go I got to connect it to something. It can't just live in a bubble.

[00:49:12]

I've got to connect it to something. I don't know what that what that is. All right. Let me hit cuts here. T-shirts are the staple for many people and they're plagued by shrinkage. And the bacon neck and the color fade and the wrinkles in the stretching cuts. Clothing completely change the game quality style. You won't go back to your old T-shirts once you go with the fabric and function is good. The pre shrunk, wrinkle free, they retain their shape and you can choose your collar, by the way.

[00:49:44]

You can go with their crewneck and go with the V-neck and go with the hennelly as well. And they have an elongated split hem for the classic curve, or I should say the classic curve him and they have a new Peka Polo, which is like no other you've ever worn. It's they've reinvented the polo. So the only shirt worth wearing once you wear cut shirts, well, it's impossible to choose regular t shirts again. They gave me these.

[00:50:11]

I wear them. They are excellent.

[00:50:14]

It is cuts, right? Dorsum Sehbai Cuts is the only shirt with wearing love by your favorite athletes, entrepreneurs and even podcast's. It seems like everyone is wearing cuts these days. Get fifteen percent off your first order by going to cuts clothing dotcom slash at them. Let's cut clothing dotcom slash item for fifteen percent off of the only shirt worth wearing.

[00:50:31]

All right, let's take a break, come back, do the news with Jena grad right after this. Just twenty five dollars, you get one and gives you Asia's favorite stuff brought up from HPF every single month, you get to drink your juice. It's hard to be cool stuff, man. Adams, Gossling. Baker, Olive, Hans, Mike Tyson here, I got some good news and some bad news, bad news. First, we're sold out of this month's Atom's Monthly Nut.

[00:51:12]

Well, it's bad news for you, not necessarily for us. Good news is you'll still be able to get all the incredible products from the fine folks and ready patch and the bug bite thing after this month's Atom's Monthly, not head to ready Match.com. That's already to make sure you don't look like the Kool-Aid man after a night out and had the bug bite thing dotcom to suck out the poison from the flying demons that are mosquitoes. A big thank you to both ready patch and the bug bite thing for participating in this month's nut.

[00:51:42]

Stay tuned for next week's announcement of a brand new Atom's monthly nut to crack news.

[00:51:50]

With Genographic breaking by all those crazy Trump tweets. Give me no trouble in the Middle East. Celebrity Trump Meltdown News with Jeanne Agena. The news with Genographic, let's kick things off with some celebrity news. Cuba Gooding Jr. back in the news, being accused of rape and the alleged victim is suing, according to the lawsuit obtained by TMZ.

[00:52:21]

The woman says he coerced her to his hotel room in 2013 and assaulted her before falling asleep and allowing her to escape. Jane Doe is suing Gooding for a crime of violence based on gender and seeking damages. Now Cuba's attorney, Mark Heller, tells TMZ clearly this is a fabricated accusation that was never reported to the police and forms no basis for any claim at this point. With seven years having passed in October, Cuba pleaded guilty to several charges in sexual assault cases.

[00:52:54]

More than 20 women have accused him of some sort of sexual misconduct.

[00:52:57]

Let me tell you see, this is the danger in the nutty chick who, like, spotted who spotted him at the club and then went over to him, I think, and like sat on his lap and then, like, sat next to him and then he put his hand on her thigh. And then she's suing him for some sort of sexual assault or whatever. Here's the problem. We don't have enough space on our hard drive to keep track of everyone in what they did exactly, especially in this news cycle.

[00:53:29]

And so then when Cuba Gooding Jr. is accused of rape, rape, as we as we used to define it, like in the hotel room, blah, blah, blah, then when you hear you hear Cuba Gooding. Yeah. Yeah, he did. That was not that was not. That was another Arnberger. No, he rape. Yeah. Yeah. He raped a woman. She put his hand on her thigh. Yeah. Yeah. This is the danger of all the sort of stuff, the looting that we're calling this.

[00:53:58]

But it's not that so seems it seems to me. That Cuba Gooding Jr. is, I think, some of the people that were coming down to I think it is a combination of bad drunk and super horny, I think this guy I think he's got someone who's down to I think he gets really drunk and does things well.

[00:54:22]

A wise man once said, oh, was yesterday on this very show about him, about following the pattern. And, you know, he said 20 women. I know. I'm not I'm not convicting the man, but I'm saying, you got it. You got to pay attention to the concerns.

[00:54:37]

I agree. But now the problem is, is the come up and sit on your lap at the club when you're drunk and then you put your hand on the thigh. If that's in the 20 women, then we have to start reading them out to get to our number because I want to go to the room number, because that's what that's where the criminal criminality is right to me.

[00:54:57]

But anyway, yeah, Tracy Morgan and his wife Megan have both filed for divorce.

[00:55:03]

And TMZ says, oh, my God, you can't fire me. I quit. Right.

[00:55:07]

Meghan filed first on July twenty eighth and Tracy followed the next day. They have a prenup, but there are two possible road bumps for the prenup. So Tracy seeking joint legal custody and shared time with their seven year old daughter while she's demanding sole legal and physical custody. Also, Tracy wants her to stop calling herself Megan Morgan and return to her maiden name.

[00:55:29]

By the way, sole custody sounds like a 90s all black women's group that like Open for in Vogue or something like that is never going to get out.

[00:55:41]

Never going to get out.

[00:55:42]

Yeah, they're like they're all have hot bodies, but one of them has a really hot face, that sole custody. And she broke off on her own. She's doing a solo thing now.

[00:55:51]

She's the one that does the runs in the middle of the reuniting at the Grammys. David, while it's over. Right.

[00:55:56]

So they announced their split last month after five years of marriage. He married Megan after Sole. So you.

[00:56:03]

Sorry, sorry, sorry.

[00:56:04]

You sorry, Chris, after you got that big settlement from Wal-Mart, which is why he got the prenup. He got married after that. Oh.

[00:56:12]

And then she got her divorce and then he filed for divorce the next day.

[00:56:16]

So did he. Is the prenup. Sorry. Did he get the prenup before the big payout from Walmart.

[00:56:23]

He says he married Megan after he got the settlement from Walmart, which is why he got the prenup.

[00:56:28]

OK, he I, I, I love Tracy and I've spent some time with him, but I feel like he's like paprika.

[00:56:39]

Let's talk a little bit. Goes a long way. You don't want it for breakfast like you don't want to see it in the kitchen for breakfast. You don't want it all the time. You know, it's not a tablespoon. Right. So going out, having some beers and having a good time, it's fun shit. Like for, you know, Crank Yankers wrap party or something. You want Tracy Morgan. But I know if you want to wake up on a Wednesday and find him in your home with you, you know what I mean?

[00:57:01]

Like, that's a lot of Tracy Morgan.

[00:57:03]

Well, was it Rob Schneider who said the first night he met Chris Farley, was it Rob Schneider? It was.

[00:57:08]

If they went out to a Mexican restaurant and smash cut, Chris is up on the table with his shirt off dancing like crazy, right?

[00:57:16]

Also, Tracy Morgan did the move where he did the poor to rich guy move, which is the guy who grows up in the tough neighborhood living in the projects, now becoming a billionaire move, which is all he did was buy Lamborghinis and salt water. Fish tanks like the saltwater fish tank is the I'm going to buy a bunch of brand new Ferraris and Lamborghinis. But inside your house, it's like I must spend a ton of money, but I don't know how I know how.

[00:57:52]

I'll buy a huge fish tank for inside the house and then outside of the house, I'll drive around in brand new Lambros and Ferraris. That was on maybe a Bugatti, I think maybe is as well. Oh, there's wow. There's Usera, Crank Yankers, Jim Florentine. Jimmy's in there. I'm in there. Tracy Morgan's in there looking sort of normal with this.

[00:58:20]

And there a rule that Tracy Morgan and Jimmy Kimmel have to wear the same collectively throughout their lives. I don't know.

[00:58:27]

And it's boonie loan officer directions. I know there's. But collectively, I mean, when you when they both step on the scale, they must be the same throughout their lives.

[00:58:38]

Right? Yeah, I know.

[00:58:40]

Because because Tracy found the twenty five that Jimmy lost also what that picture is that from a wrap party.

[00:58:49]

I think so, yeah. It looks like you're Caroline's in New York. Oh we are. Yeah. Yeah. Looking at the checkered pattern in the back, we must have had a Caroline's wrap party. I don't know. It's all a big blur.

[00:59:00]

If somebody I swear to God, if somebody came up to me, my. France, maybe it's the pandemic, I don't know if someone came up to me and said you were never involved with a show called Krank Anchors, I'd go, wait a minute. I think I was like, oh, no, you weren't. And I'd go, wait a minute. I thought me and Jimmy came up with that other guy. Like, I just Google that you're not.

[00:59:22]

I go, OK, Jedi mind trick shit. I'd literally go, well, maybe I'll come up with another show one day and show you and I would leave and then he'd go, wait a minute, I'd go, I'm leaving. And he'd go, We're in your house. And I'd go, Oh well then you leave. Yeah. And then he could convince me it wasn't my house. That's kind of where I'm at right now. That's a little foggy.

[00:59:42]

That's the premiere party and Caroline's in oh three two.

[00:59:49]

Why did you do what? New York.

[00:59:52]

Kookmin, part of the fronts.

[00:59:54]

I think you told a story once you're to Caroline's.

[00:59:58]

No, and I wrong with that. I again, Brian, as previously stated, to confirm anything that I said, it's a really good point.

[01:00:08]

But it's from May 2002, I, i the up fronts would either be in New York or L.A. or they had them in both spots.

[01:00:17]

I just thought you told a story once about up thing at a comedy club.

[01:00:20]

But that that that that that could be that could work or not. Who knew you were there and you loved it. Yeah. And I do know, as I've always said, that Crank Yankers was called prank puppets.

[01:00:34]

And I was in New York with Jimmy when we were arguing with the attorneys as to why it couldn't be called prank puppets. Think about the innocent time. That was two thousand and one and a half, which is we wanted to call our show prank was malicious puppets.

[01:00:51]

And they said, no, why? I don't get it. It opened us up to too much liability. So this had to be before Johnny Knoxville and all those guys, I guess it was, and I talk about liability.

[01:01:04]

It was an insane conversation, found gold, though I'll go on the record as saying Francesca's better title.

[01:01:11]

Great. All right. What else?

[01:01:13]

We got Gina Grahn so alive. Reading of Fast Times at Ridgemont High is happening Friday to benefit Sean Penn's humanitarian organization that's helping with covid testing and more called Core Story.

[01:01:25]

Oh, yes, I think he said. I interviewed him a few weeks back and I think he said something about that.

[01:01:30]

It's here. It's happening. He's going to join Julia Roberts, Brad Pitt, Matthew McConaughey, Jennifer Aniston, Morgan Freeman and even Jimmy Kimmel on Friday night. And Shil above for this live reading of the 1982 classic movie in conjunction with a one night fundraiser which is organized by Dane Cook.

[01:01:51]

Oh, but this is a hodgepodge. But there's news I should prepare you for because otherwise you might be disappointed. Sean Penn will not be playing Pockley. But Cameron Crowe and director Amy Lync are scheduled to give a special introduction at the beginning. It's unrehearsed. It's going to be at 8:00 p.m. Eastern, 5:00 p.m. Pacific Live streamed on live by lives platform apps, social channels, along with Facebook, Tick-Tock and of course, Facebook.

[01:02:19]

And yeah, have they announced who's playing goalie now? Please be saleable.

[01:02:25]

Well, that's the thing. He's going to be there. I can't give that guys Qalibaf Oscar winner before he dies.

[01:02:30]

Honeyboy is an incredible he's a gifted actor. I absolutely agree. The live stream is going to feature donate button with all the proceeds going to Core and Reform Alliance. So that's how Sean Penn is involved.

[01:02:42]

And it's probably going to be spectacular if I know Hollywood. I think Will Smith and Jada Pinkett daughter will probably take place because they know the way things are going in Hollywood also.

[01:03:00]

I kind of feel like I need I want the old cast back, I went with Reinhold. I don't know if you can you can you get Phoebe Cates out of the house? I mean. Oh, yeah, there's Phoebe. I'm legitimately asking, like, does she do things? Is she reclusive? Is she sworn off of Hollywood completely?

[01:03:19]

I think she's done acting, but I've seen pictures of her on the red carpet years recently. So I know she at least goes out and supports Kevin Kline. Yeah, you say probably for Kevin Kline, huh?

[01:03:29]

I just can't actually access anymore. She was a big deal, would she? So I guess the question is, is is she kind of semi retired and cool about it? Or she kind of sworn off something like there's two approaches. There's the there's two approaches to not drinking. There's I was out of control and now I. I can't drink. And then there is I don't drink, which is two different people, but it's the glass at a wedding or something.

[01:03:59]

It's the same process. No, I just there are guys the aforementioned. Well we're just talking about President Trump and the aforementioned Dennis Prager. Dennis Prager doesn't drink, but it's not he doesn't have a beef with it. He just doesn't drink. He doesn't think he doesn't like it. I don't even think he would drink it at a wedding. And then there are people that Dr. Drew knows better who, you know, drove their van through a preschool and at blue, you know, a point seven oh.

[01:04:27]

And need to stop drinking. Drinking's no longer advised.

[01:04:30]

Right. So the table is Phoebe Cates not acting or is it just not interest her having done almost no research?

[01:04:39]

I think I recall that she is retired from acting, but I think she's pretty game to support whatever her husband does a red carpet like.

[01:04:47]

But she would do fast times. As for the cause, right? If I imagine so.

[01:04:53]

Kevin of camera Crower Amy Heckerling ust so maybe they thought they'd get more eyeballs if it was people that are that are still actively working as opposed to reuniting an old crew.

[01:05:03]

I know Jennifer Aniston a bit and she's the sweetest person in the world. But does she have to be involved in every production.

[01:05:12]

Everything. I mean sweetheart, she's great, she's super friendly, she's super nice to my kids and stuff like that. But I feel like there I feel like she calls her agent every day, like she probably turns on the TV and yells her agent, how come I'm not on the show? And then like, it's a documentary about Vietnam. I don't care. I should be going down that Ho Chi Minh trail. Like I just feel like she's in everything.

[01:05:38]

That's funny. OK, I've done no research on this, but I have thoughts on it, which is OK. She's got tons of money, right? She's got friends money. She's got the rest of her life. Blood of Jennifer Aniston to me, should, in my opinion, should be like the female Tom Hanks at this point in your career. Like a younger one, like she's every woman, like every woman can identify with her. She's not beautiful or ugly.

[01:05:57]

She's just she's attractive in a real world kind of kind of sense.

[01:06:02]

But her career choices are kind of odd. But again, I think that's more like, hey, I've got enough fucking money or whatever I want. I can fuck around and, you know, do this silly comedy or this whatever. I don't care. But she's like an every woman should be the most relatable person on earth to I need to be relatable.

[01:06:19]

I could never get that kind of. I agree with you on. There she is.

[01:06:25]

I think there's a sense. And I don't know, but I'll tell you this, especially if you're in a successful sitcom that's now 20 years old or whatever it is, and the money's still coming in from your kids watching on Netflix.

[01:06:40]

Sure. But I think there's a sense. And I understand it, I'm sort of half in show business, like there's a sense of money aside, nobody wants to be the old person from the sitcom from 20 years ago. Everyone wants to be relevant. You know, this this notion of being relevant, like what's happening today. And part of it is doing projects and getting paid. But the other part of it is just showing up places, being involved with places when something like this makes the rounds.

[01:07:15]

Does the news cycle, hey, they're redoing Fast Times at Ridgemont want unimportant in that person list? And that's what I think we're talking about here. I don't know what I'm looking at. Max Spatafore. Phoebe Cates. Yeah, I want to know.

[01:07:31]

So when her and Kevin Kline were married, they agreed to alternate their film schedules so they could take care of the kids when she became a mother. But when when it was her turn to take a role, she was always too shy to take it because she thought it'd be too time consuming. So she really just stayed home to take care of her kids.

[01:07:46]

Either they're not married anymore. I think they still are, if you wanted to interview her, could you interview her? I don't feel like she does anything while we're looking at Augusta.

[01:07:58]

Yeah, well, I'll throw this out there again.

[01:08:01]

No research to help my head case never struck me as a powerhouse of an actress, whereas Kevin Kline is a fucking world of talent like that guy bursting at the seams. I wonder if I wonder if that's a nice way. The world what Chris just read a nice way of sort of massaging the truth, which is Kevin Kline kept fucking getting work.

[01:08:21]

Yeah. You sound like someone who never saw gremlins.

[01:08:25]

She's up to like, you know, just kind of disposable, right, Brian? I'm sorry, but that scene where she's explaining why she hates Christmas. Oh, I mean, I look, you're going to have to get a snow shovel out and eat your words, because that is the definition of child that's in the Smithsonian right now. Every every acting academy shows that during orientation. You understand sometimes if the answer is so obvious, it escapes you.

[01:08:56]

Now, you've got to find the clip, Max iPad, because that's the greatest. And it's not only the greatest acting tour de force in cinema cinematic history, but writing is well, this is the second time today that's happened to me because Krista vcp a client of hers.

[01:09:12]

Like, are there any famous movie scenes involving oranges? Like, what the fuck are you talking about? And of course one of the most serious scenes of all time is like in Godfather putting the orange out and then died. And yeah, it's, it's an iconic scene. Of course it didn't come to me. I felt like a failure second time today.

[01:09:26]

Well, she wanted to know that. Well, I'll tell you off the. OK, sorry, Brian. Sorry, Chris. You can find that. Yeah, I'll find it hit. Simply say.

[01:09:35]

All right, well that you have to look you have to listen to that scene and remember going into that scene. We had to accomplish when you write scripts and I've done quite a few. There's two things. Sometimes you just trying to get a laugh or trying to get something from the audience. But sometimes you just need to accomplish something like you go. This person hates Christmas y.

[01:10:01]

And when that when that's when that's the challenge, then you do it as quickly as you can because it's not funny or interesting. Right. So you come up with something where you go, I was I'm Jewish and I was the only kid in my preschool and everyone made fun of me during Christmastime or something like that. Right. It's pretty, pretty easy. Yeah. So that with that in mind. Well, we'll find that scene first. I'll tell you about simply say most home security companies trap you with high prices, tricky contracts, lousy customer support.

[01:10:33]

There's only one that is a no brainer and that is simply save everything to protect your home and arsenal sensors and cameras for every room and door window, all motion detectors all tailored specifically for your home, professional monitoring. Day and night. They will reach out and ping the police or the fire department or medical professionals if necessary. No contracts, no pushy sales guys, no hidden fees, no fine print starts at just 15 bucks a month. U.S. News World Report aimed at the best overall home security for 2020.

[01:11:09]

Right.

[01:11:09]

Dawson had to simply save dotcom slash at home and get a free HD camera for our listeners that simply save dotcom slash at home to make sure they know that our show sent you.

[01:11:17]

All right. Yes. Before we watch this scene, can I just start by saying you're 100 percent right about those scenes where you need to establish why this character hates Christmas, when is necessary in this movie is totally unnecessary.

[01:11:30]

It's almost a non sequitur like this is. I'll bet there's like another reason why I hate Christmas. Oh, really? Do tell, right?

[01:11:37]

Yeah. She didn't need to hate Christmas. If your friend is like a hell of a day today and they want you to ask him why, you need to know why the Grinch has a problem with it, not Phoebe Cates.

[01:11:47]

All right. Here's the scene and we're going to find out why she hates Christmas.

[01:11:57]

He was Christmas Eve, I was nine years old. Me and Muhammad were decorating the tree waiting for dad to come home from work. A couple hours went by that wasn't home, mom called the office, no answer.

[01:12:18]

Christmas Day came and went and still nothing.

[01:12:24]

Hold on, Brian. I think Meryl Streep could pull this off. You know what? I'm re-evaluating everything I said about her versus Kevin Kline. Keep going.

[01:12:31]

Keep going for five days. Went by my last eat or sleep. Everything is falling apart. It was snowing outside.

[01:12:46]

The house was freezing. So I went to try to light up the fire and that's when I noticed the smell.

[01:12:53]

Silent Night just went to minor keys smell.

[01:12:57]

Firemen came broke through the chimney top and me and mom expecting them to pull out the dead cat or a bird. And instead they pulled out my father. How long can I say this?

[01:13:08]

If a fireman came to my house and broke through the chimney top and pulled out a sparrow. I would be pissed. Yeah, I'd be like, you know, much fuckin masonry work that's going to cost me now because you couldn't have just leaned a coat hanger down there and fucking grabbed a bird.

[01:13:23]

Well, who's your mouse? Here's the problem. Yeah. And also, conversely, or to be fair, if I'm the fire department and you called me because you thought you had a squirrel for Christmas on Christmas, I'd go, hey, listen, there's a fucking barn on fire up the street.

[01:13:36]

Now, do you mind? We're busy. But anyway, when they find. Well, he was dressed in a Santa Claus suit, he'd been climbing down the chimney on Christmas, his arms loaded with presents. It was going to surprise us. He slipped and broke his neck, died instantly. How would you know that's a good point.

[01:14:05]

That's how I found that there was no Santa Clause spoiler alert. Yeah, all the kids I had a friend tell me at school in the third grade, but, you know, to each their own equivalent of Seinfeld, that's the tractor story.

[01:14:23]

A couple of things that always bug me about that from a writing standpoint, which is did the mom know about this? And then where are you guys, like upstairs in your bed? And he was going to come down through the chimney alone with no witnesses. What's the point?

[01:14:40]

Yeah, she went to bed alone, presumably, obviously. And at some point he met his fate.

[01:14:47]

Right. So. And then what's the mom do you think about the mom? The mom's like, where's Burt? I don't know. I'm going to bed.

[01:14:55]

Yeah, she called the office. Yes. I mean, who was he going to surprise? In the middle of the night, if no one is there to witness Santa's coming down the chimney, I mean, there are other ways to present your presence, right? You could just go out. Nobody there got your bathrobe and a boner and put them out. Go back to bed. Right.

[01:15:19]

It sounds like he was having some sort of a manic episode that they don't touch on and should.

[01:15:23]

Oh, he was mentally ill.

[01:15:24]

Yeah, that's probably. Yeah, that explains a lot. Probably the director's cut.

[01:15:31]

But this is an ambitious dad where he literally was crawling down. And by the way, it's filled with creosote and soot and it's a mess. And there's also fire shelf you can't get through. It's not like a straight line down. Well, now you tell them.

[01:15:47]

And also, if you sleep according to you in your chimney, if your chimney is basically a garbage chute, which it isn't, your chimney has a fire box and a fire shelf. Like if you go up and look in your chimney, you'll see like a thin crevasse where the work goes up. It's not just wide open. Like you couldn't just look up and see daylight through the bottom of your chimney. But if, in fact, that is the chimney that he was crawling down to pop into the fireplace and surprise everyone, then when you break your when you slip and break your neck, you end up on a Dürer flame log at the bottom of the chimney in the fireplace.

[01:16:24]

You are discovered when they come downstairs. Yeah, I have so many problems from a building standpoint, from a code standpoint, from a right, a creative writing standpoint. They're just lucky I wasn't in the room when they were laying down this idea.

[01:16:38]

All right, let's bring it home. Gina Grath. You got it.

[01:16:42]

I'm Gina grad. And that's the news.

[01:16:44]

You know, that was the news with Gina grad.

[01:16:49]

Well, last but not least, Madison read Mr. the stuff I don't have in front of me, Maxo pada, but I can speak from the heart of my heart. Madison Reed does very good coloring for women's hair and has been doing it for a long time and they've been staring at it for the last couple of weeks.

[01:17:08]

Spread out. Oh, is Chrissy doing it or Gina doing it.

[01:17:12]

Yeah, I got a little bit Lynnette's doing it, but that's doing it too. And now they're doing Madison read Mr.. And you, you don't get the shoe polish. Look, you put a little dab in your palms, you kind of rub in the collar, go online, find the color that works for you, and then you take another little dab of the activator and you sort of rub that around and you put that in and you have a little more pepper and a little less salt.

[01:17:34]

And you can do with your beard as well. And it just has a natural look because that's what they're good at.

[01:17:39]

It's Madison Reed, Mr. Right Dosso of Madison Reed, Mr. Dotcom, that's Madison Redmond, Broadcom and use code caroler for 10 percent off, plus free shipping on your first box. Again, that's code Khairullah.

[01:17:50]

Well, Ed Calderon, our expert on all things south of the border until a Russell, who's a director of a four part docu series, the last narks of crazy interesting story about a DEA agent who was murdered by the cartel. And that the story is is we knew about it. This guy wasn't protected by his own his own country. It's a very interesting case from eighty five and kidnapping and blah, blah, blah. So we'll get into him with that in a second.

[01:18:19]

I'll bid adieu to Gina and Balde and we'll bring in Ed Antilla right after this.