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This is a news laundry podcast and you're listening to and I'll have the ungrazed Penhaligon or News laundry up in the cabinet shortly. Welcome to another episode of and have in the Soviet Times, one of the few days when we all come to office and record the Hafter at the table sitting together.

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Hopefully we're all covid free of the whole taking precautions unless we are symptomatic of asymptomatic. Yeah.

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In fact, that's one of the things you already have given the daily survey that's come out one in four percent.

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Yes, we shall discuss that survey. But let me introduce the panel first, joining us actually from ASRM. Where exactly are you right now, Sushant?

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I'm in Milwaukee right now. I'm the occupation and source Sushant outlook that he's the editor of. How do you pronounce it?

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Nissin Indian companies in the present dot com design dot com. That's Nesat I n dot com. It's a bilingual webzine on the Northeast. He has twenty eight years experience of covering India's northeastern regions and its neighborhood for local and national dailies. He covered the region for 11 years for the Hindu newspaper. He took voluntary retirement from The Hindu as a senior assistant editor, and he launched Nissin and with his wife, Ratnapala Stalactite. She's a national award winning journalist and writer.

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In the same year as he took a voluntary retirement from Hindoo. He's been a regular contributor to Frontline since 2004 and travels widely in the region to report on political happenings, armed conflicts, ethnic conflict situations, development and governance issues and natural disasters, much of which is, I guess, occupying your time right now. So welcome.

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Thank you so much. Thank you so much for the generous introduction.

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No, not at all session. Thank you for making the time before we get into the discussions. And I know our headline discussion at is at this half hour is going to be awesome. Let's see what else made the news in the country. We had a manager tell us, but before she does, please remind you to keep news free.

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Click on news dot com on the top right hand corner and subscribe, because when the public pays, the public is served. And I will never tire of seeing this.

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35 year old journalist Vikram Joshi was shot dead in Gaza by the new AP. This was a revenge attack because he had reported the harassment of his niece.

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Floods have affected Lack's in West Bengal, Assam, Bihar. And Magalie, out of all the flooded states, West Bengal has reported the highest death at 151. That's crazy. I mean, right after, um, fund, the state has had to go through this and over one point seven to like people in twenty three districts have been affected in the state. They has apologized for comments. And Punjabis Jautz, she said he basically said that they're not very smart, you know, very smart, but they're good looking at something.

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They're strong, they're strong.

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But that's the old type. And it's really strange, I think that the smartest. So I think it's just people jealous of Punjabis who make these sorts of jets and Punjabis in their lives. It has to do with reality anyway.

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So he's like a good you know, this is what most news and guzzles. Look, I'm not saying this.

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These are thoughts of some people. So in the regards to being counted, the Supreme Court has pulled a puppy for failing to uphold off the land.

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Thank you.

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They're going home. They want an inquiry that how did a guy like him get bail in the first place? So they they want some sort of a judicial inquiry into that that order of the court court that gave him.

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Isn't that a bit rich for the Supreme Court to say this, to uphold the law of the land? They are not logical, the framework.

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And it's like forty, forty cases. He was out on parole. Forty years. Rajastan High Court will issue order on disqualification petitions. There's been a cabinet meeting in the residence. Meanwhile, BJP has said that there's indirect emergency in Rajastan.

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In fact, we'll explain this a little bit because there are many wheels within wheels.

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So hopefully the minute I can shed some light to clarify, foreign experts were injured after fire broke out that oil and gas oil. Well, this isn't in some where the fires have been on for a while now, since June 9th.

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Yes, Supreme Court has sought a detailed response from President Bush on contempt matter over his tweets. We can discuss this. Yes. And in fact, the tweets in question apparently is that the Supreme Court will go down as having weakened democracy or something of the sort does that vague.

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So, yeah, well, what, 23 three percent of the residents of coronavirus antibodies according to their logic. So the first of its kind. So one in every four person.

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Yeah. Yeah, pretty much. Really.

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I hope I've had it and it's all OK. covid-19 meanwell covid-19 vaccine for those who have not got it yet. Some reason to feel happy. The Oxford candidates are safe and showing some immune response and trial with a still a long way to go. Yes, there's phase three which is the most crucial.

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And other than this, the two American vaccines also entering phase three. And the U.S. has already placed an order for the how many million, two billion dollars. And they've blocked whatever a one point six million vaccines. They've already ordered only one hundred sixteen million, something of the sort.

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So on that. What we shall start off with, what's happening in a couple of things are, Shantha, we have two bits from Joppa, neck of the woods, as they say.

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One is the oil fires, which did not get that much attention at that time.

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But would you say that for a change this time, at least some sections of Indian English media, which is, you know, watched in much of the policy making circuits, have taken up the same floods with the kind of attention they deserve?

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Or do you think it's still too little, too late?

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I think the discussion was more on the the alternative problems rather than the what we call in the so-called mainstream media. I like to follow myself. I would not like to call anything as mainstream media because we are very in a difficult position to call whatever is mainstream and which is very, very because media after the advent of digital media. So but I believe it grows to digital platforms. It has created a buzz. And following that, the the other channels, like the traditional channels and some of these papers newspapers have been doing all along, it's not that they haven't done it before, but then the digital channels did it in on a wider scale.

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That finally probably pushed the television new channels to pick it up. But you're right, compared to previous fluxes or the previous years, this time the people of India is talking more about the the flood situation in the Senate. That's right.

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Now, tell me, how bad is it? It's as far as the area is concerned. I believe it's not just the parts of I don't watch it also. That may not make the investment now.

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This happens every year, you know, just like the flood of Bihar. That happens every year. In fact, when I was you know, I've travelled that extensively. Every Dabar eatery is on this 30 foot stilts. Like that's how they build the stuff because they know that they're going to have flood every year.

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Is there I mean, is this something one has to live with? Is all of us? I'm technically a floodplain and as complaining that it gets flooded is kind of pointless. Like, for example, in Delhi, when it rained, all the water came within Islam within bridge. That's because the floodplain we have constructed on that that floodplain belong to the river and speech. Is is that the case that or is it basically mismanagement of land?

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Because it is also partly it's in nature and partly manmade. I mean, we know the devastation. Like, just to give you an idea of the scale of devastation from May 22nd onwards till yesterday, as many as fifty six point two like population is affected in this flood. Hmm. Five hundred and eighty relief camps are open to give shelter to the displaced people. And the crop period affected is two point five four hectares. And already eighty nine lives have been lost in floods.

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And the figure is more when you take into consideration the people dying in the landslide in Ghoulardi landslide areas. See, this is just two weeks of flood. We are going to have one more day. We just to understand, Assam's floodplain area is 40 percent of its total geographical area.

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So that means forty percent of the state of Assam is actually a floodplain and actually a floodplain. Well, how how it is. How the width of the water is increasing sea. 1897 and 1950. We had two great earthquakes following the earthquakes. The reverby came up also because of the heavy silt in the river carries Patrizia International River right from it. It has it has bassin countries of China, India, Bangladesh, Bhutan. So its tributaries and the river.

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It carries a lot of silt and heavy because of heavy siltation. The carrying capacity of the river has gone down. So the river is going up and therefore the there is Benkler and severe bantling erosion because, well, when the water cannot be carried by the river, then it is spilled over. So the fraternity is also getting in place. And because the population is also growing, increasing year after year. So the affected affect and the and the cumulative impact is going up.

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Now, I can just give you an idea. From 1953 onwards till 2019, twenty six point one five million hectare crop land was affected in floods. Well, successive years of about forty five point nine six lakh houses have been damaged. Over three thousand five hundred human lives have been lost. Six point eighty six cattle's lives have been lost. Over 5000 crores of public institutions have been damaged. Now, when you take it, I mean, when we talk about discuss flood, we don't discuss about the flood, particularly in that particular.

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Or into one or two successive waves. The problem with us is that we forget talk about flood after the last wave is over.

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So the numbers, the data, the data you just shared is of how many years? Sorry.

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This is from 1953 onwards. Well, OK. So so I mean, the damage that this caused, the losses that this causes, you know, even in economic terms is huge, really huge.

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And it's a cascading impact to you after this. Plus, people rebuild their life, start rebuilding their lives. They will repair the house. They'll go back to the field because their dinner and their crop was lost. So they will again go for cultivating their land and they will start their life. But imagine the same household being affected by flood year after year, year after year.

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And you can imagine what is it, what the economic condition, cascading impact of the economy. So this would be that we need to tell is the cumulative impact, the waves of floods that live impact that live on the people of Azem. It just not just about talking about one flood or one. We have some flood or the flood in a particular year. It's been happening apart from flood.

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Yes, flood. When it comes to water recedes, people can go back to their lives. Another severe problem is the erosion, which I explained to you in the beginning that because of the the river coming up, following the earthquakes and the siltation, the bank line erosion is increasing. So the erosion figure, if I if I can give you the eurozone figure, since 1951, as much as 60 like hectors, 8000 square kilometers of land has been eroded away.

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And it has led to displacement, cumulative displacement of 10 families to more and more people. Families are becoming landless due to eurozone. So it is a much more severe problem than flood. But in the state disaster response fund and the National Disaster Response Fund, erosion is not considered as a national calamity. When you have the loss of land, then you become landless and you become a sharecropper. Then you have no place to stay, you know, place to cultivate.

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You have to move to.

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And then you become labor rather than a farmer. Yeah, that that is happening already.

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So I think one thing that is clear, at least from what you are saying, is that almost half of azem is a floodplain, but almost that 40 percent is an Good-Hearted.

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Since I've been then, those of us who've been there know that it is on a slightly higher, slightly mountainous region. So Garrotted never gets flooded. Is that right?

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Yeah, we have the waterlogging problem in water, but otherwise no flood. In 1988, it flooded the flood waters of water into the city of 1988 and 2004 a little bit, but otherwise it mean so we have a on this panel can come in.

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I wrote a piece that it was picked up by several Hindi channels and a few English channels for a change, some good ground reports. Yeah, there were people reporting from there. But I mean, if a population boom is happening and, you know, the amount of people who exist in a segment, if half of them is a floodplain, this is an unsolvable problem. I mean, it should just get used to it.

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That's what I was wanted to ask you, actually, that I mean, is there a solution to this or is it just we just have to accept that it's going to happen.

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That solution that I mean, it has to be it has to have multiple pronged approach. I mean I mean, you cannot manage remember Albatros, an international river having to five like 80000 Skateland areas. It's a massive area. I mean, until and unless there is international cooperation between the two countries, you cannot manage the river in just one piece, one stretch of the river.

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So I guess this is not the time China and us are going to sit together and discuss, wrap up with. But that ain't happening.

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Yeah, but the other efforts, it's not that the people are not being efforts. There are what like the prosecutor said, he tried to bring experts from the up and up dialogue were dialogue with the basin countries, experts from the basin countries so that there can be at least some kind of cooperation in managing the the river. Otherwise, simply just the solution that is being tried is the deconstruction of the embankments that has been tried since 1950 onwards. No, but also in s.m, around four hundred and twenty three embankments, Desert Storm embankments.

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So these are put on the river state so that on the other side of the embankment, the the property, the houses of the people can be see now 90 percent of these four hundred and twenty three embankments, these have outlived their span and they are vulnerable to breaches this year. Only two hundred this this flood to have some flood. We have as many as two hundred out of four hundred and twenty three. Two hundred and twelve. And Beckman's had been rich while one thousand seven hundred.

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And 20 roads in 30 districts have been damaged. Hundred and eighty two bridges and roads have been washed away. So the embankment, until and unless you the reconstructed embankments, these are not providing any solutions because the funds are released. And then it becomes just the the the unscrupulous, the contractor politicians, they will just pay the money among themselves and do some repair work, a little bit of repairing work. And when the floodwater comes, it gives way to the pressure of the the the the water pressure.

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And the embankment is bridge and the water cannon hits the village and the creek area. So until and unless these immigrants are able because they have 90 percent of these embankments have I'll keep this span right.

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So now clearly corruption is a problem there that's endemic. It's a perennial problem in many states, including many parts of the northeast, especially. They have a special fund that actually goes out there. So there's more to share among politicians and bureaucrats. As far as the death toll is concerned, Bengal has had like one hundred fifty one people that this flood. Right. That the death toll is is really high in Bengal considering the flooding has happened more recently as a.

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m..

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Yes. Yes. Bengal. And then we get to see the high death toll in Bihar also is also ravaged by floods. It's badly.

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I think one thing, though, I mean, at least for the reason we can learn is that cyclones are, what, an annual event there. But at least the government got its act together in evacuating before. So it's a natural phenomena that you can't really work your way around. But at least you prepared, I think, at least for another and other states, that hasn't happened. What do you mean? If you look at Delhi, for example, now we've accepted that everyone is going to breed poison.

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We read a story about Kaziranga. I think the the forest guys, you know, they have created some artificial mounds or artificial hillocks so that whenever there's a flood, so animals can go, you know what, those who look them, they can save their lives. So how effective it is. So we read the story in the Indian Express. So how effective this is?

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This is, yeah, as much as many as 30 islands have been built by the department inside. But the problem with this sea, it's a grassland and it has its own character.

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No. So you cannot build too many islands all over the park. And that is that that would be very disastrous. So these islands can provide shelter, but the main problem lies in the the the the road that passes through the depart.

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Yeah, that's very true, because the animal corridors are there and this road intersects with the animal corridors as many as five to six animal corridors. So when the floodwaters, the animals, they cross over to the to the other side. On the other side, it's hilly area. The the the landscape is hilly. That's part of it is. So they go and to a higher level on the other side. Naturally there is a little. But these corridors are affected by the INVEIGLE movements.

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In fact, on Daily Dose, you know, Snigdha, wonderful Daily Dose Presenta had also given the data, not all the animals. In fact, more animals have died because of vehicle impact than by drowning when they were flying so slow.

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The idea of officials figure that sees the animal hit by the vehicle is around 17. I have the data this morning and we have like 12 rhinos have died so far, nine due to drowning and due to natural that they can hold dear's around sixteen years have been seventy seven years have been killed due to Animal Vakili. That is that is a sorry how many days I've been hit because of vehicles. 70, at least 93.

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How bears have died. Oh I see. OK, ok. So it's much higher that I don't.

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Seventeen have been seventeen have been killed due to vehicle hit and there was this one news item that you know the these elevated points for the animals to escape the water. They had come there, but the chief minister was to land so they had to be shooed out of there.

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Is that true that the minister, when the finance and health minister, he had gone to take a gun for all review to talk with the park guards, then there was the it happens like when you go on the road track that I know also comes of not the Hylan, OK, and then the on the inside route.

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So the it had to be so in and he could so that she she is going to put some light on the state disaster management that you have. I mean what kind of body is this, how do they prepare for every year, you know, for handling this someone who these people are. Yeah.

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So it's for the disaster preparedness. They have to be the primary leads depending on the building and strengthening of the embankments. So the. Every year like this year, we have the richest two hundred twelve breaches in the amendments, we have four hundred and twenty three and. So when the floods, which the flood water reached the embankment, then this needs to be blunt, the captain bridge and then repair. But this year, what happened and many of the bridges remain unattended and they also cited the results of be.

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But when it happens, they will they'll be waiting for the release of until the end of the closure to delay the onset of the monsoon. And then when it comes down, the work is also poor. But besides that, this I have explained, these embankments have outlived their lives built in the 50s, 60s, 70s, or the normal span is around eighty five years to 30 years. And they've already spent. So whatever what they do is just wherever the beaches occur, they will plug it in the sand.

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And then there are some new techniques, technology to have apply these growbag geotech extents. But it is not all over. And in some places they would build up concrete spires. But an event like immaturely this year, the experts that that has been washed away. So it's again being exposed to to the water inundation. And so this is primarily. But the problem with Sam is that poor regulation of the disaster response fund. So although it is the amendment obstruction and the majority party cannot be taken up with this state disaster response funds, but the relief and rehabilitation, at least the the damage of the house or house buildings, public institution schools, this can be taken up with these funds.

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But then every year, some will have savings of the state disaster response fund. And this has cost the state really dearly because the 15 Finance Commission, it has made its allocation based on the formula for giving ratings to expenditure by the states over seven years from 2012 to 2017 18. And based on the calculation, some has got only seven hundred seventy two crores, whereas Maharastra has got three thousand two hundred twenty two crore, Bihar has got one thousand four hundred and sixteen, grown up has got 109 and Italy chiggers Monteverdi's has got one hundred one thousand eight hundred twenty course that the son has got one thousand four hundred eighty one grackles, one thousand three hundred and fifty four.

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Gross has Glasgow 2011 gross. Tamilnadu has got a thousand politicus some has got seven hundred seventy two crore under the new it is Nikolaev. Nomenclature is still disaster. There is a disaster risk management fund of which 80 percent of is state disaster response fund and 20 percent is the disaster mitigation fund. So a sum has got low allocation because it failed to utilise the fund in time of different disaster disaster response fund. I mean, nobody will look me. I will start.

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We'll talk about that after the last wave is over. Yeah.

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And I think that's true for many of the government fund allocation that based on how much is spent, you know, they give you for the funds.

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And just one more thing regarding this. The people who are injured at the back, Arjun Goswell, intensive care. Now, this has, I guess, since June, this has been burning. How does the flood impact this? And what is the impact of this intensive care and other adjoining districts or areas of villages?

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Sindh The flood has also affected the same people who are affected by the the blow out in the basin. Guess we'll know. There have been some many of the people are still in the relief camps and the floods have also disrupted the operation to douse the fire yesterday. You have mentioned already the three expects that from the alert, who are working for an experts who are working on the the controlling the well, I mean, dousing the fire. There was an explosion and they also sustained injuries, minor injuries in there.

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And the flood has also affected the entire area because it's part of that same floodplain. So it is also affected. And people people out there did their crop destroyed their homes, their gardens are destroyed the to the fire following the blow out in the gas will. So they have also been affected by the floodwaters. Right.

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Sushant, I just want to ask, so all these people who are actually affected by this, is there some way the government is helping them to get back on their feet, going to need compensation?

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And they do. They do in the sense that. But then it takes time and then not everyone is able to get the rehabilitation grant in time and the the most of the time. Even though there had been able to go back, see, apart from being Flatirons affected by the eurozone like the eurozone, creates also the political problem. It adds to a political problem of the identification of the foreigners, usually an archaeologist, when he doesn't have a great impact.

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Like we have the areas, we have the river, a tiny island across the river, of course, where people live. Almost 2.5 million people live on these islands. Magilla is a bigger island, is also affected in flood and erosion. Eurozone is a severe problem for Mazzilli. So people have to take SIFF to the the the urban centers to work as a construction worker. So it wasn't affected. People are not getting their inability to adapt because it's still not in the priority list.

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It is not considered as a national calamity in the true sense of the funds. But the state government can now declare it as it local disaster. But the eurozone is more severe than the flood problem flood after the flood water recedes the but and the erosion takes away the land. You become landless, right. So that that that proportion that compensation has has not been and are still something that is spoken about that.

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Is it an issue? What is what what is anarchy in Assam today?

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It is not there, but then it remains the issue remains. I mean, yeah. Now the election year is approaching in six months, time will be in the election mode. And literally all of this will come up. And then every time after post-flight, most of those people have to sift through these areas and under the aid that already is required of over me and naseeb it, but at least be the initial identity. So this has a direct impact.

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So it also needs a brighter attention and it should be considered equally as severe natural disaster as with flood.

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And before we let you go, you want to tell us a little about your new venture. Why did you think of starting it?

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Did you think that that is not enough? That is being done in the the Northeast and you can tell our audience a little bit about it so they can go check it out.

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Yes. The idea of launching this have said was there and it wasn't something that we can highlight about Morty's. And it was in our mind, me and my wife, she's also a journalist. And so we didn't have initially we didn't have the technology. Now, the digital technology has made it possible. Now we actually are. So I'm against completely against anyone right now. I mean, I have I have no right to accuse any media outlets in India outside the Northeast to complain that they are not covering you.

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But we can tell the story because we are the technology which does. That was the main idea. Now, we we when we talk. Yes, naughty stories can get more space politically. This space and this reason is not given too much of a priority, because when we talk in the large spectrum of Indian politics, the no because of the last number of the parliamentary seats. So this gets less preference. So but then the issues like diversity, biodiversity, culture, everything, I mean, every single place on the art is so unique in each place has to tell its own.

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I mean, I should not say that. Well, only an artist should figure out why not why. We should also learn about it all other places. Every single piece is on art in other states and in India.

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And once you learn about it also including benzophenone.

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Yeah, but we found that, yes, we need we have so many stories to tell, probably, which for many reasons they have not got the space, but the technology has now made it possible to take these stories, tell these stories to the outrageous world, the main idea of our launching race. So I can just quickly one example. If you have if you allow me shovelhead like we did one story, one of our contributors, Balladur, is a generalist local journalist living in one jesty, and he wrote about a small place that cultivates Mandarin, the variety of oranges.

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So he wrote about the plight of the farmers who were affected by some disease infestation in the the the the tree. And then they became very poor. They have lost everything. And then he did a story for us. And the moment is did the story. The next morning, we got a mail from science reporter in Germany and then he why he was so interested in this story. He said that the same because he meant that Inverarity. And the same kind of the the problem needed and dairy farmers in Europe were also having and they were also looking at solutions that are being tried across the world.

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So just one story, one because a place that otherwise would have been considered too local to be published in any any of the national channels or any of the national newspapers or the national outlet. But that story could travel as far as to Germany and connect with Germany. REPORTER So we have the technology with us. And that was the main idea. So there was an offer in Hindu that it gave an offer to the Aguirre's for those who have already completed 10 years.

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I seized the opportunity, but this was good then. So I decided that I saw the opportunity. So I put my application. Good morning. I get it. And then we started this. So we wake up. Basically, what we have not gone for Daily News is we are going for the long form and also we are we are trying to generate the content.

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Oh, that's great. And good luck to you. Good time you got out of the window. Otherwise, you may have been a part of the entire fightings that are happening all across the news media, across the country and Hindu to have an Apple and Google Play store.

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Right. We have not been given it as a subscription as yet. We have still kept it open. But because we are still developing the content. Yes.

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Once you once you have a big enough footprint, I'm sure people will be happy to pay you for journalism, because I think that's the only model that somebody else put on the record.

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Express it. I followed News Longy very closely and I really appreciate the investigation that you do in all kinds of I mean, after getting a story I always look forward to, you will get back. And then what about a detailed story that you have done because the investigation that you do is so detailed.

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Thank you so much. Yeah, so thank you. And we have you, of course, editors to thank the reporters and also the analysts and our members who actually pay for that. I mean, we have a nelson-carr project and so.

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Yes, but thanks for joining us. Good luck with your request. All our listeners do check out any z i n e dot com that's nissin dot com and do support good journalism.

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So thanks, Lashonda. Have a good day and good luck you.

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I'm grateful, grateful for the opportunity for this conversation. And you want a recommendation before you go for an audience, something that they should read.

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Yes. I would like to recommend one book, The Problem of NE by VPC. Nipissing was in the Home Secretary also as secretary. It's a very good book to know about naughties. That is my recommendation. Also his job as somebody our because when we normally we come across, many people who report on this will come to notice, visit and do some wonderful stories and they ask about the reference and then where they can get an idea about it. So I would strongly recommend Bippy since the problem noticed.

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Right. Thanks a lot, but I have a good day, man. Thank you. All right.

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OK, now let's move on to the horrific murder that has actually caught on a CCTV camera of this 35 year old journalist who in Gaza about the art of freedom possible.

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So what do we know about that? And now they've risen a fear against the harassment that he had complained of, complained about before, which has been killed.

[00:33:26]

So I'm guessing eventually they'll also fight in a fight against the madrassa. Right. That's only restricted to the harassment, not the move against the modern converted into a martyr.

[00:33:36]

And due to harassment. Right.

[00:33:38]

It's a three or two case right now of any arrests. Is this this whole the jungle raids?

[00:33:45]

You have arrested nine people, nine people and men accused and the same people whom we had mentioned in this complaint. So, I mean, how different it is from Tamilnadu, the police station. I mean, well, the police were the culprits. They did. But here also they completely ignore this complaint. And these are journalists.

[00:34:08]

I mean, you'd think the journalists would have at least a little bit of clout when it comes to. Yes, at least getting a complaint registered. I think two policemen have also been suspended. Yes.

[00:34:16]

The guys who probably ignored until he died, they the the police station had not carried out any investigation into his complaint. The complaint was just lying idle in the police station.

[00:34:27]

And I saw and I had put out a tweet saying these guys like, do we know like I did some digging on this story.

[00:34:34]

You're working on this story. We're trying to find out the profile of these nine people, also the policemen who have been suspended and the ones who had ignored the complaints. So we are looking into this properly. We should get that story up soon.

[00:34:48]

But I mean, I don't know what profile we create, but enough has already profiled the murderers because apparently there were eight of them at dunams and one had a Muslim name. And he and I put out a tweet saying that whatever, because. Apparently, the guy's name, I mean, it doesn't sound Muslim enough, so they said Shamsuddin son, Shamsuddin son. OK, so they could not just say Samir because he's saying yes.

[00:35:10]

So didn't that tweet have caught by the brother? Yeah, he was. This was but this is the man accused of what he was saying, three, four names. They just picked that one.

[00:35:20]

Shamsuddin sent the text of the tweet out in the water. The guy said, but the text of the tweet only had the one Muslim name.

[00:35:26]

And I just thought, I mean, it's I mean, it's no longer supported and has gone full Auburndale.

[00:35:32]

I think it's so different than the two. It's quite disgraceful.

[00:35:35]

I have a few emails to read out because our discussion safety exam last week has clearly triggered well, hasn't triggered people.

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It triggered a debate. I was going to say triggered a debate, in fact.

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So I think this is one thing we should do, you know, get our production team who does and Nelvis and Anil, because a lot of subscribers have very opposing views on this issue.

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Maybe they can we can do a series on Swifties.

[00:36:02]

Yeah, we should do a lot of subscribers views, and they're contradictory to each other. So, in fact, a subscriber who's written today is contradicting an even let it come last week.

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So rather than us, me being the middleman or reading out each other, maybe we should just get them and have a conversation, because the whole idea of the analysis, and I hope you guys have been following that new podcast, is to reclaim the debate that you can disagree with people who you may like and be friends and colleagues will be friendly with, even if you're not friends with them and you can have a civil discussion on things we disagree about.

[00:36:29]

So maybe we should do a citizen and it was a road safety zone.

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But before I do that, I have one Coppelia.

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You know, over the last two, three weeks, ever since Adam Haftar has the paywall has been removed because we are moving onto a new website.

[00:36:43]

And until we can get the tech completely sorted for that, our subscriber numbers have suddenly fallen.

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So clearly now that half doesn't read the paywall. A lot of you, since you can consume it for free, I'm not running a membership now. This is going to continue for the next three or four weeks because that's how long it'll take us to completely get the payment gateway of our new website. So there's no inconvenience and people accessing it. It really breaks my heart that we are doing that to make the experience, you know, more glitch free and smooth for you.

[00:37:11]

And while we are doing that, a lot of you just don't subscribe because you're getting it for free. Not fair, guys. You got to subscribe because you are not just supporting the other half. That's what our lowest cost enterprise is. It's just four of us sitting around and we just have to spend for lunch that we have to feed these people who eat so much. But other than that, there's not much cost. Let me tell you what.

[00:37:29]

There is a cost. There is a cost to the kind of reporting that happens, the one that the romancer is doing on ground. News-gathering And on that note, I do hope you guys saw that. And it's in our project, the final part of the vehicles and in our project went up. It has got very good response. Do share it widely. Yeah.

[00:37:45]

If you're thinking of buying a house, please. Yes. Do read that before you think of buying a house. I mean, even if you're not, I think this is a perennial question. This is a classic question that everyone has to encounter at some point in your life.

[00:37:55]

Are you buying a house or not? I really think you should read it. It's so detailed. It's like a little book, actually.

[00:38:00]

It's not just about buying the house also because the Indian economy, the large part of it, it's been driven by construction and real estate, you and the economy, the local MUFID, the detailing is superb.

[00:38:12]

It's really quite amazing.

[00:38:14]

And thank you for all the people who own the ones the ones who have already bought it, they have invested. So that story is also coming. Yes.

[00:38:22]

In fact, that story is something that is also another Adilson project by Ritika The Tiger on Twitter and Twitter. Now just to give you an idea, you know Wacol wrote that piece. It took him a while writing it. The illustrations are done by Inish Jesse at Rachet Ranch and worked on the layout so that a lot of people who actually work on making any report happen. So we really need you guys to step forward and subscribe. It's three hundred rupees a month, those students.

[00:38:47]

I understand you can't, but if you're earning, that's not a whole lot. So do consider subscribing. And until our website, our PayPal is back up or, you know, firewalled that you can't get content that is premium doesn't mean you don't subscribe.

[00:39:01]

And let's not fit to get someone like we call you not to do this piece, 8000 words and so much data. He has to stop doing other freelancing work. And he's a freelancer. So, you know, he has to also be paid well. So and it's not I mean, this is just not the kind of journalism that can just happen already. So his labor also needs to be accounted for. And I mean, you also want to be able to pay people.

[00:39:22]

Well, we're doing a good job. That's very important. You have to incentivize would be. Yeah. Otherwise, he'll just I mean, then everyone can just write thousand. Well, opinion piece on why this policy is good, that policy. This is like a this is actually an investigative piece and you just have half a dozen reviews of people building.

[00:39:38]

Yeah. And we have another nelson-carr project up that's in the US. Kastoria, let's first of all, I hope you guys have like to how many have gone up on the rights now for peace have gone up.

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If it's not a three to two, two pieces of the third short is not we're not counting the show. No, no, no, no.

[00:39:53]

Just the third one is going to come on Monday.

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But those two pieces, again, they're like more than 8000 words. Like, really detailed thousands of words and the third piece is going to come on Monday and then after that we have two or three more stories on, as I'm sure while bosun's and amusia working on the daily Wright story, they're not working on anything else because this story, they have to go to court several times.

[00:40:16]

They have to go to police stations, have to go to localities. So all this really costs money and it takes an effort.

[00:40:21]

And I think if you're going by your experience, I mean and they'll say no, no penalty. No, I think on this issue, we are going to report at least for a new trial. This is a very it's a burning issue here.

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And we have no excuses because we're in Delhi. Yes, we can say that this is happening in this night.

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And at the moment, it appears really, you know, one sided, you know, investigation and, you know, there's more prosecution than prosecution. So I think a lot more action is going to happen in the coming year.

[00:40:53]

So, yes. So you take it from the romance and he's experienced and, you know, doing stories like this that he doesn't leave.

[00:41:00]

So we'll continue reporting this all year. So we do need your support and we have another Nelsan up project up. This is regarding the brutal killing of people by the police. The trigger, of course, was the killing of Bjerre and his son Bannocks in Tamil Nadu. And the spotlight was back on custodial deaths. But a recent report India saw on average, wow, is that true? You should check that out.

[00:41:21]

I'm even scared to say this number, but there's a there's a daily death count of five.

[00:41:26]

Yeah. Yeah. There was a report recently custodial. So.

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Well, I think I still think that's being undertaken. Conservative.

[00:41:33]

Yeah, well, OK. So if that's the kind of custodial that's that's happening, this requires a series of reports just like we're doing on the Delhi riots. So thank you for those 150 people who contributed to that Nelson Astroland deadly riots. We have a new analysis project up. Do contribute and don't cancel your subscription just because the paywall is down. Guys, come on now. What are you guys like?

[00:41:55]

You talk about Meraj, you were supposed to read an email means yes. Oh, my God. I hope that Leon was tomatillos. You do. You are so insensitive.

[00:42:05]

I was told this week, my friends also maybe I should watch my sensitivity. I think it's. You ought to.

[00:42:11]

Oh, don't give up on this is Ganzel culture annexion. Don't do it. I was about to say I have become a jerk because of your effect.

[00:42:19]

How you got clearly the bigger joke between between the two of us. OK, so my gullible mind has been impacted.

[00:42:27]

Yes. Yes of course. Blame it on me. Yeah.

[00:42:30]

I remember that Verizon will become a toxic boss. So. So this is from Scheeler. She says, Hi Tim. I usually end up criticizing news, but that's because I genuinely want to say something constructive. Keep up the good work. Few points. I want to point about the comedian scene in Mumbai.

[00:42:47]

First thing, the ugly major event was just terrible and she was making a joke on government and Modi and not on Shivaji Maharaj comedian said sorry because éminence thugs are damaging comedy clubs, gebek them and economically and and not because they buckled. It was an economic fallout. Fair enough.

[00:43:03]

That's what we discussed was getting the point.

[00:43:06]

Reasons for censorship is that also SA Hillshire as joke was quite offensive. So he might have to feel. One major point you missed in all this is that the guys who were given rape threats, who were giving rape threats in the video were not really giving it out of anger. Those videos are just publicity stunts. Those were are practically copycat of Hindustani bow. And it's a new subculture that is cropping up in India. These rape threats videos are coming up as a form of entertainment just to get subscribers.

[00:43:30]

And in fact, Manisha, you had recommended a story on this. We should do that.

[00:43:33]

Yeah. In fact, yeah. It would be quite interesting to profile these guys, but maybe even Mignot was talking about this indiscernible. Right. And who's also on also sits inside a car and he has the same sort of way of talking.

[00:43:46]

And he was invited on a reality show and some entertainment big boss.

[00:43:50]

OK, so that that kind of sassone TV and all are doing their bit to make sure these people become stars, then it's a new thing, but probably accepted by everyone from the right and left. And Maharastra, it's no more just Shivaji. You will have to use the title along with it. It has to be Shivaji Maharaj. Chhatrapati Shivaji is probably shall be considered a new norm in the future.

[00:44:08]

This is one of the reasons for the outrage that everyone missed since Maharaj has been appropriated both right as well as Dalitz and also the local Muslims. There isn't any question about his legacy in Maharastra. In today's Maharashtra, Shivaji Maharaj is considered as a deity and any disrespect to him shall not be tolerated. It's just how it is now, to be honest, even for me, who considers himself to be liberal, agnostic and hit every religion's existence, even I won't be able to accept a joke on Maharaj.

[00:44:35]

It's just how we met. Australians are brainwashed.

[00:44:38]

If you want the time, read the book written by Govindarajan Busari, who was Shivaji? I think the book simply shows how Shivaji Maharaj was and is a strong inspiration for the Dalit cause. Keep up the good work. Thank you, Sheather. While replying please on the suspect Shivaji Meraj. OK, she thought I was the suspect.

[00:44:58]

I did not because I want to. Cannot provoke you, although I don't think because it may offend someone, I will never hold back on a joke and I hope it remains that way.

[00:45:06]

I agree with a lot of what you say, that in Maharashtra it's no longer restricted to Left-to-right.

[00:45:11]

I mean, you can't say anything about Shivaji. Yeah. One thing I will say is I will not refer to him as Maharaj or Chhatrapati. Depending on my mood. I will refer to him. I will not disrespect my own thing.

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Like I will not respect The Revisionaries because and I don't refer to Gandhi as Mahatma Gandhi furthermost Bapu because I have a personal affection for him.

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And I think Mahatma a title which I have never agreed with. I just want to make a joke and make a joke for me.

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He's great and I just hope that's how people.

[00:45:40]

Yeah, I mean that this is something that is happening as but also I remember going to the put a couple of years ago and they're like these museums. Basically everything is about a modern Arpatepe and the kind of history, the stories they tell. I'm a recorded history. It's just exactly contrary to that. It's opposite of everything that happened.

[00:45:58]

But I'm in this is his vallauris only way.

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And also a lot of stories about, you know, other kings and princes is also sort of Dejoy thing also.

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But I suppose this is I mean, he's I mean, it can't I mean, fair enough. You can respect him and you can have a lot of affection for him. And it could be like it's a regional ethnic pride sort of thing, but it's happening for a long time.

[00:46:20]

But this whole idea that I mean, if you don't use a title, you're disrespecting somebody that started happening.

[00:46:27]

Now, people everyone has started taking offence if you don't call it for soldiers killed in action. If you don't call them martyrs, people lose it by even the army. Doesn't say, my dear, you can see soldiers killed in action or soldiers who die. Like you don't have to say mahto when it's become a thing now and people get angry, they get very angry.

[00:46:44]

If you don't say one before the Supreme Court has with President Bush. And is that he didn't refer to the Seijas honorable S.J.

[00:46:50]

Really? Yeah, well, and in fact, there was on the other hand, there's this one judge, I think it was the at the high court who said that. Don't refer to me as my lord. You can call me judge. Yeah, my lords. Yeah, my lord.

[00:47:02]

But you could give me Lord Gillet. They may later on I figured out it's my Lord.

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I suppose it's also to do with me because like forever in this country, these titles have signified. I mean, you don't have to earn respect.

[00:47:15]

Do you have a title like it's you have respect.

[00:47:19]

OK, this email from Prani, he says, al-Salam commented on and on. Then I must say to Romancer Love the way he pronounces Otniel per head of domination.

[00:47:26]

Meraj and salutations to one and also greetings to the producers and the team Bannan and have to yo that they are Anil. And welcome to the fact that we have a new producer. Guys, let me say actually what triggered triggered is in inverted commas me to write this email is the ongoing trend of debating with subscribers who write their opinions on the case with most debates on until after the election. Once on a side note, recent email, FDM lumped everything from slave ownership to rape to talk about rape in one group.

[00:47:53]

I would like to say to the writer Mary Fasel, those actions article thoughts. So I guess, you know, you're responding to the emailer come last week.

[00:48:02]

He says you can't cancel someone because they don't think the same way as you do or because they don't feel exactly the same amount as you do. Of course, people are not free to say anything they want that are universally accepted. Limitations of freedom of speech. You can't yell bomb in a crowded place. No hate speech, of course, and you can't give someone Mobeen Kigali's and say that's a freedom of expression, but you can't punish someone for the talks about these limitations.

[00:48:22]

Also, definitions and meanings change with time. Yes, it is modern in today's classic, given the word limit on emails and communications being made the way it is, there's no space for nuance. Please limit these kind of debates. They'll have to. You can always call the well articulated writers for analysis panel where you can have a much healthier, nuanced debate. I'm not saying don't engage the subscribers would have. That's becoming more and more of only these debates.

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Long time subscription.

[00:48:45]

Oh, we could go to analysts it, but I complained it about last time because we live in this privileged sort of bubble, so we kind of tend to focus too much on these things.

[00:48:56]

Then there's another email that the subscriber doesn't want us to read out. So the writer says that I don't have to read it out or publish it, but I'll even respond to it. But I quote, I do hope you will read it, if only to roll your eyes and call me a precious little snowflake, unquote.

[00:49:14]

No, I won't call you that. The point being made is that me and Maneesha have been very insensitive of the way we responded to someone who wanted a day off because they wanted to deal with someone suicide, the Social Democrats, Rajput. So point taken. I may not agree with all you said, but I read it carefully.

[00:49:33]

And Maneesha will also improve. Improve on must not be such an insensitive, horrible person that she is.

[00:49:40]

And one more on this. God of your email is damn longa. It's eight hundred ninety words so I will not read all of it.

[00:49:48]

He says I avoided writing about Rowling and canceled classes because of what happened on that set about inviting me in some future Hoft about hearing reading some of the mails, especially one which is highly critical of Rowling. I have to jump in to defend. A lady who has been a great hero of mine for 18 years, first of all, are they can you just write down God's name? Take down his email? Let's have an analysis and.

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Yeah, we got him in touch with someone who thinks that Rowling getting canceled is OK.

[00:50:11]

So let's do that because, you know, there's a second release, the previous love that we had an email explaining why it's OK to do maybe that also the two of them can do that.

[00:50:20]

So but he also eat out the bits in italic. He says it wouldn't be a stretch to say that had it not been for Harry Potter, wouldn't have taken to devouring English content, politics, journalism, et cetera, leading to the subscription of news laundry. Oh.

[00:50:33]

Then he goes on to say it was Rowling who slowly separated the path of accepting homosexuality from 2008, her defense of gays and writing beloved character Dumbledore, etc.. Then he says Rowling has donated money for a bunch of causes and then he's listed some of them, he says. But to call for a boycott because she might fund research, which proves her stance on trans issue is the dumbest cancer culture he's heard in a while. And then he goes on to say, liberals must decide which trench they are willing to die in.

[00:50:59]

And most small l liberals are getting increasingly frustrated with this walk witch hunt. If a person with a liberal credential is JKR can be hounded or canceled like this, then I shudder to think what conservatives must be thinking in the West.

[00:51:11]

Small L Muttalib not ideological liberal classical liberalism. Smaller liberal Lieberman. No, not as a as a as an ideological group.

[00:51:22]

Give them a liberal.

[00:51:23]

Another question I would like to pose is, let's say the lead scientist at Oxford working on covid vaccine have some views which are anathema and works. Feel what his research be cancelled. Would he be hauled out of his job?

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And in Oxford, keep looking for candidates who not all the liberal LS is more so cryptozoology get his classic strawman.

[00:51:40]

In my view, she is a very she is vilified because she has dared to question some of the nine and three quarter commandments of works fail. So it's a very long email and he has sent many links to articles. So Gorev, I think this because we are getting so much, so many emails on this. I think it's good for us. What I like is that a lot of our subscribers disagree with each other, which I think kind of goes against the the theory that everybody who subscribe to one news outlet will be of the same mindset.

[00:52:11]

And I think so many of us have proved that's not true. So thank you all for disagreeing with each other. Let's let's debate this amongst subscribers. Sokurov, we will get in touch with you. And last week I thought that we had another email that was kind of endorsing why it is OK to cancel Rowling because of. So maybe they can have a civil debate on any NL So I'll leave the rest of the email for later.

[00:52:33]

Let's talk about whatever you want to go. Yeah, take it away. Meraj, what is the issue that is bothering the country or us right now?

[00:52:41]

I mean, coronaviruses, the most existential crisis facing us. And if the serological survey the NCDC has just published in Delhi, we are in for like a really, really horrible time.

[00:52:54]

So just to give context, this is basically a survey that is done. They tested, what, twenty thousand people randomly? Twenty one thousand. Some people across, I don't know, the last ten districts something.

[00:53:04]

Yeah. Over yeah. So over ten districts.

[00:53:06]

And they tested these people randomly to check for antibodies which are similar to what is done in New York to see how many people have had to Daugherty's asymptomatic carriers and ah the twenty one thousand people tested. Twenty three percent of positive.

[00:53:18]

And if you extrapolate that to the population you're talking about four point three million for four point five, four point seven million million people have it as.

[00:53:26]

But that extrapolation. So that's that's about more than twenty two percent of the population. That's about one in every four people. Yes.

[00:53:34]

So that's the case. That many shots theory that we've all had it twice. It was.

[00:53:38]

And this is not just a list. There was a similar service, Serizawa in Call-Girl that was like two months ago. They found fourteen, fifteen percent of the listings.

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But isn't that heartening? I felt really happy to know that a lot of people have been infected, which means that the pandemic is not such a terrible thing. After all, a lot of people got it and survived it. It's silent.

[00:53:58]

A lot of it. Yeah. I mean, that that was the case from the beginning. I think what that shows is that it is only one percent. So if you go by this logic, then the mortality rate will be less than one percent from zero point something. I mean, Libertador official figures at the league immortality, two percent to one percent. Helicon stage skip Japanse percent.

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But I really doubt, you know, the figure that they give, for example, in the league. I think that that's how many. Two thousand. Yeah, that's another the but but in this period twenty six thousand people have died in the league.

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So I would like to investigate each of the dead and find out, I mean, how many were posted on a story recently about how I mean, it looks like all these numbers are undercounted.

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And if you when you're talking about one percent, if only four and a half million people are affected, one percent of that is a lot of people. And another problem is like I mean, I think what makes it even worse is I see him. I did a nationwide survey, similar survey early June. I think they still haven't released that. There released bits and parts, but they're refusing to release the subway. No, I think only the order makes it orneriest each death.

[00:55:06]

Only then will know the truth. And they're still saying no community transition action on that.

[00:55:12]

We have a piece on this, by the way, up by a columnist who is a public health expert. So we will have some pieces on that regularly.

[00:55:20]

But on this community transmission, I think a lot of this other you know, like, for example, the androgenic does not want to completely take on America or say that that is so. He says Hamadeh is upset that this constitutes as community transmission. But we don't know whether, you know, the doctor. Also the which now the Indian Medical Association is distancing himself. He said that it is going to transmission the other states also where people are saying the same thing.

[00:55:42]

But technically, it can only be declared community transmission by the center.

[00:55:46]

And this whole area said, I mean, considering he would be, you know, toeing the center line, even he kind of floated on the border of none. He said that there are zones and pockets where, yes, it is being trans. It would consult community. But does that mean India as a whole would become commuter transmission? That I would not say. So, you know, he's got a headset like that.

[00:56:08]

The only way to do, you know, connected to this thing by tracing people, if I get it, if they're able to track, you know, movements, then they will declare it since they are not doing this tracking thing, trying to do it now.

[00:56:22]

But the point is they can't because the numbers are so high. But on the deaths, you know, and so you just too.

[00:56:27]

But this is not just an academic exercise to declare this like a community transmission link. People have been saying it doesn't matter. I mean, the pandemic is there, whether it's community transmission. But I mean, the piece we have up by tomorrow explains why it's very important, right, when you recognize that reality and then there are policies.

[00:56:45]

Exactly. So it isn't just like, OK, they're not saying so what's the big deal? Right. It is a big deal. But this study is important for people to know.

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Now people need to know exactly what's happening for them to act accordingly.

[00:56:56]

I mean, this is a general like this Indian thing, not go Holgado School.

[00:57:00]

But then he goes on, does this study indicate that we have got herd immunity, not a herd immunity? You need to infect 60 percent very far from that.

[00:57:08]

I don't think we're going to get to that stage, but there is no evidence as yet.

[00:57:12]

I mean, given the scale of everyone, like, you know, smallpox, didn't you say so?

[00:57:19]

Now, there's just one thing. You know, Indian Express has this piece written by Malika Joshi on the 18th of July. It says over 21000 registered in the capital in April, June quarter, 5800, less than in 2019. So the number of deaths the data now on are more people dying. The data doesn't show that less people have died in the same quarter as compared to last year.

[00:57:43]

The Washington Post story. So what happened is know, that's the story.

[00:57:46]

I read this story fine, but I still feel that each death needs to be audited. Not only then you will know that. Right, because I really doubt, you know, there's an explanation for this.

[00:57:58]

What happened is, I mean, according to Washington Post, the they didn't talk specifically about the Mumbai.

[00:58:03]

So what happened is, though, I think they talked to the commissioner who is responsible for keeping the records, he said when Loden first happened, March or April. So when they started calling, that's one, there was a huge drop because accidents and everything that was that was not happening.

[00:58:17]

Second was because it was a lockdown. They couldn't, like, take the data already. They started getting that data back data only later, OK? And now when they have the data back up and the data going up like huge.

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So what you're saying is this could go up. This was just a data anomaly. Statistics that now with what are we comparing?

[00:58:37]

For instance, many states, including Delhi and Calcutta, they were not giving the comorbid cases initially. You? No, I agree.

[00:58:47]

You have to look at each death. But what I'm saying is, if one were to take that, has this pandemic led to deaths which are out of the ordinary, then this data would suggest not, while they still may be more deaths than we have counted because of this. And I don't know whether you have noticed amongst your peers and your family and yourselves, because you are being so careful about washing your hands and not touching our faces. At least some of us are being careful about that.

[00:59:10]

The regular cough and cold that one used to get, one hasn't got anybody exposing itself to any virus. So I think because of that, maybe general illness has also come down. So, I mean, there may be many vials within reason factors, but at least there is no surgeon Netsky by this. You know, populations with cardiac disease as a neuro just in terms of coronavirus.

[00:59:29]

No, I mean, if you even look at what happened in Europe, we are doing better in terms of this, that this comparison of people dying in this quarter is people dying of coronavirus only.

[00:59:41]

No, no, no.

[00:59:42]

I just all just ordered all sit ins. And crime would be one big reason for all that happening, because people are not getting to hospitals. They're dying in their homes. They're not counted as these deaths rate. And in any case, in India, only about a quarter of the deaths are recorded. Even otherwise, normally most that are not even recorded, so this data is just in terms of government assistance in Europe. He had all these symptoms, but that fear that he will have to go for the institutional quarantine, he never went for the check of it, didn't do anything.

[01:00:14]

He just stayed back at home. And after 16, 17 days, he was feeling really weak, you know, so so but he had all the symptoms. So I don't know how many such kids even I was I thought I would also find out if I can be smuggled out of Noida in case I get caught because they were not allowing you home. Quarantine and institutional quarantine is extremely bad.

[01:00:35]

So first of all, that would be get us all into trouble because you are going for us or sonic is thing. But just so you know, I don't take the name here, but someone who has written for us got this testing done, whether you have antibodies and came positive.

[01:00:52]

And that person told me that this is when I had it antigen and so, so covid related.

[01:00:58]

Well, on the upside, like Maneesha was saying, the Oxford vaccine has entered phase three. Yeah.

[01:01:03]

Although every podcast, an article that is saying that says that that doesn't mean that it is going to take a lot of vaccines fail at phase three, but because there are so many that entering do in America and doing phase three, I'm not even counting the Russian Chinese.

[01:01:16]

And I'm sure we don't want those because you can easily take out the 140. 140 are not three.

[01:01:25]

About seven have seven or have even the Indian one has just phosphenes gone into phase three in English history history. And now they're going into thousands and 100 100. That's 100. Eviatar So if history is on our phase one of his two eyes. But they are so.

[01:01:40]

So but that's good news, at least from the Oxford Kusturica.

[01:01:44]

He opened the school vaccine and then Texana, they told us, what do you think? But anyway, even if it does come out, it's going to be a while till we get it. No, I think it was announced when two wonderful people and stuff like that and then maybe we'll do it.

[01:02:00]

I will delay it as much as possible. And if that's what's happening around me, people who are taking, I'd like to see it for phase of human trials around people.

[01:02:11]

A friend of mine wanted hair transplant done because, you know, seven, eight is a horrible thing to do.

[01:02:18]

It's very bad. I was like seven, eight years ago. We were 38, 39. I said, why do you want to live? What what is the future? My concern was this is a fourth generation treatment. If Salmaan is anything to go by, you go mad after that. Done?

[01:02:34]

No, he suddenly felt it after having gone bald. Or do you think, oh, boy, got his hairline.

[01:02:40]

Three people's photographs. You should look year after year, Salman Khan, Narendra Modi and Nawaz Sharif. And you will know who hired her to start her transgender who hired a rich.

[01:02:51]

You know her is like all I know you still on the long term impact, it always looks fake. Docile man.

[01:02:57]

No, no, never leave. A couple of my friends have done it and it's you can tell you can't do unless you really like.

[01:03:03]

Look, you can tell or in the just in the beginning days and months and then you can tell because then it's like any other.

[01:03:09]

But, but the point is it's still no one knows what happens after fifteen twenty years. I resisted twenty five, eight years ago so I don't know, you know.

[01:03:17]

So first let's see how and if we lose them. I know not but but let's come to Rajasthan. First of all, I'm a little intrigued how Rajasthan is still occupying headlines every day. Is it that big a story? I mean, yeah.

[01:03:31]

I mean, it is no, it's not a big story. It's a big political story. And there's nothing for newspapers and TV.

[01:03:38]

KORONA This is not the first state that is going to be toppled or will be toppled or has been toppled. But all of them got headlines. But this gets headlines every day because come on, we're seeing Monica, my how can this not make headline? He's calling his own deputy chief me or somebody based in Atlanta. I mean, this is a great political Galvestonians.

[01:04:01]

He was copying such an insane give. This is what will get them abandoned. Now it's you, them.

[01:04:07]

And now the story assumes more importance because India had just left it. And now this is a second, you know, young big guy and don't want to be, you know, very good friend of R.G. Gandhi. So he's also leaving. So the two top guys, you know, leaving and one, I think entered Rajya Sabha yesterday.

[01:04:29]

He was a very nice picture of him. And they were just sending them do with each other and many months apart. But OK, now, just to vie for me, this is interesting.

[01:04:41]

I've brought it up is that the word constitutional crisis came up yesterday. It had come up a little, but yes, it came up seriously. Just to give us context, what's happened is that the speaker of the Rajastan Assembly has given a show cause notice now that show cause notices being referred to as.

[01:04:58]

Their membership has been cancelled, disqualification, disqualification orders by media, but technically it's disqualification orders to show cause notice. And this one such invited went to court with the two big lawyers who represent the BJP, usually saying that they cannot disqualify us. And the high court has reserved its judgment, although they have waited until tomorrow, until tomorrow.

[01:05:21]

Now, what CPG was, the speaker says, is that by many notice the eye, this is a constitutional crisis because how can the high court decide on the validity of my disqualification before I've even disqualified them? So he says that is one thing the other party says is that you can only be disqualified because of you have disobeyed a whip on the floor of the House or have voted against the party. It cannot happen in some people. Me, the disqualified, you're not being disqualified from the party result from the assembly.

[01:05:52]

And therefore that conduct has to be reflected as conduct inside the assembly. So I guess both have a point in one sense. And to make matters worse, when this whole resort politics is happening, a bunch of these and Malays were in Haryana because Haryana, the BJP ruled state budgets. And since as strong as they had told us, I can see that you can't get nervous here. So I just had police came to question someone that Anapolis said, we will give you access to this police force as police.

[01:06:18]

So I just think that it's a question of time before any one state gets really pissed off that you can't keep, you know, buying it, selling a Malays or whatever it is. I will send a bunch of police to the centre to arrest some cabinet minister, then the Delhi police as you can. Eventually the police or the police and states. I foresee a conflict between states like we have never seen in the history of India. There's a piece in the inexplicitly by the Shennawi.

[01:06:47]

He explains that he says this whole resort politics, buying and trading of families, the whole idea of like the test of a government strength was you conduct a flawed test.

[01:06:57]

But if this is happening so brazenly, what's the point of a flutist? Because you already know this is going to happen. It's a flawed test was because you couldn't as in you couldn't influence these people. They'll vote their conscience. But this has happened. So what's the point is, I think is a bigger constitutional crisis because then you have no way of assessing governments, then maybe maybe the law should not be just about their conduct on the floor of the assembly.

[01:07:18]

It has to be generally. But is is do you foresee such a constitutional crisis coming up? I mean, suppose the court how far are we from a government saying I will not obey the court's decision?

[01:07:30]

There is no constitutional crisis at all. I mean, she claimed that the judiciary cannot enter into our domain. I think he's also wrong because he cannot help us. I think legally he cannot issue short notice to any MLA if, you know, he has done something outside the assembly. So he cannot he has no locus. And so on that basis, if these people go to the judiciary, I think is pretty valid. So I don't see any constitutional crisis.

[01:08:01]

I think this is just a Scrooged political songs written by Mr. But doesn't seem like such.

[01:08:08]

I mean, I don't think that general assemblies would be up for sale. I don't think.

[01:08:12]

No, no. I think these are these are the speculations. I can't make anything. I mean, I know the story that we should do or if we had, you know, that kind of bandwidth. I mean, those tapes which have come, those tapes need to be studied.

[01:08:30]

I don't even know about some of our audience may not know. So there are two tapes, two or three tapes which have been resurfaced, which is supposedly, you know, talk between Shekhawat, who is the you know, this being a minister, you know, minister and someone from the Congress. So there's a talk between the two about horse trading that how will we topple his government gets an economic and this could cost cutting.

[01:09:00]

It completely depends. This claims here that is not in the tape. That's a hard data.

[01:09:06]

If somebody just claimed thirty five rupees, most among will Congress offered me a full year of legal notice of not legal notice on them.

[01:09:19]

Given that, I mean, you prove it. I mean, they have to prove it. So, no, Shekhawat is saying that it is not my voice and the other family in the Congress, he's also saying is not my voice.

[01:09:29]

So I think right now, what I again, I really doubt I mean, going by what has happened in the past, like Salman Khan tapes, you remember that Salman Khan tapes when he was blabbering about because surely, surely his voice.

[01:09:50]

But but after the forensic report, even that was doctored and they came and they said that it was not. Unconference So I feel that Vun, we need to find out the truth behind these tapes because that is something that the chief minister is playing on. I mean, he is saying that he has written a letter to the prime minister, you know, saying that such a thing was happening. And his what is your evidence, your evidence of these three tapes?

[01:10:19]

Nothing. As long on the exchange. You haven't checked their accounts in India or abroad, you know, or their family accounts, and nothing has been done.

[01:10:26]

These things usually happen in cash and in black money and stuff. Yeah, exactly. And it could be transferred in the region.

[01:10:34]

So obviously they can't do it in consultation with the television, although it's quite alarming that to say they've managed to even be together with this guy.

[01:10:43]

And I'm saying that they didn't speak for like a year or so. I shall be allowed to know that we haven't spoken to him for a year and a half.

[01:10:49]

No, no.

[01:10:49]

That is what it is to gloat was just trying to, you know, cut him to his size. I mean, that's what he was trying to do. Gehlot, right? I mean, you know, planting leaders of his community, his caste against him, promoting his own son. And this is only and then he see that his political existence with Gehlot is not possible. So he revolted. But I yeah. And I think I think for him it was a question of Dauda.

[01:11:16]

Interesting to see how, Zengel, because, I mean, publicly, he said have done that. They want to come by. And I thought I said have learnt that they would be on the warpath against him. Should be interesting to see what compromise they strike if Sachin is to stay back.

[01:11:32]

So one more email from Bush, head of Tatem. I've been a subscriber for more than three years and really like and I'll have done the other work. You guys are doing that the first time and writing Hopea, including after the reason I write this mail is part of the discussion around council can culturally angered me.

[01:11:47]

Not very good. I've been a generous subscriber with the lady of mentioned that she was not able to say no to her employee who had requested leave because of getting affected by Suzanne's passing at this point, both Maneesha of it and then giggled. Then I went on to say, this is the thing I have a problem with. I don't understand it.

[01:12:04]

At a later point to the discussion manager says, I don't need a holiday for it. Giggling again.

[01:12:08]

Oh, by the way, like you in most of it. And then is that he cannot get away by saying he doesn't understand it by now. He somersworth that if you don't relate to it, then read articles about it. If after that you still don't understand or relate to it, then you don't have to.

[01:12:22]

All you have to do is not be insensitive towards the subject. First of all, you don't know if the person really suffered from depression or not until you know for sure the least you can do is not joke about it or you can just laugh it off saying I don't understand it and that is a repeat offender.

[01:12:37]

I remember during one of the other discussions on me to specific to men, specifically the Kevin Spacey case, if I'm not wrong, even at that time, I and then said something along the lines of how can a man get traumatised by Kevin Spacey exposing himself? His point was that he failed to understand how such a thing could impact men. The point that I'm trying to make is to be considered a sensitive topic, especially if you don't relate to it.

[01:12:56]

For God's sake, don't laugh when discussing such topics. This is a public forum. You can joke all you want. Privately, it made you both look rather insensitive. Not that other panel members are sensitive and did not joke about it. And what are you even saying about anyone getting affected by Suzanne's passing? They have the news on multiple suicides after the chance incident expected better from you guys, especially when you just had a great columnist reporting for the recent podcast discussing about suicides and triggers.

[01:13:21]

So having said that, I really like the way. So I said he put out a point across on topics of discussion. I would like to add that marriage is a wonderful addition to have to thank you. That is not to say that I don't like others.

[01:13:30]

Having said that, I would be taking a break from Hafter. We need different guests or it gets mundane. I'll be supporting in all other ways, such as intel projects. Vestibules. Thanks, Viewshed. Thank you for mail. Appreciate it. Yes.

[01:13:42]

And I hope when we shall learn the lesson, I will not be dishonest with you. I won't know Kevin Spacey thing.

[01:13:49]

I'm completely with him. I thought you were really you were displaying your toxic masculinity with your Kevin Spacey, but yeah. On this. Yeah. Maybe I shouldn't worry about often giggle at the wrong time. It's a problem I have, but yeah. I mean copycat suicides are a thing. And in fact after Sushant Singh Rajput case, there have been people, there have been suicides imitating him and there have been attempts to suicide. So that's all she does.

[01:14:12]

I think what we will, I think is what I was trying to say is that if you don't have a history of depression or if you don't have a history, if you're not really coping with this as an issue, is this something that you need a holiday for? I think that's what I mean, is could this trigger you in such a way that you needed? It could, of course, because it has.

[01:14:29]

But how? I don't know.

[01:14:32]

How do you understand that in our office, Meraj had corrected me on this, although I still have my view on that abuse similar to this, I had at one point said this over the top weakness.

[01:14:41]

A very close friend of mine who is a single mother in the US in New York City, got her 11 year old son's teacher, called her one day and said that is this coming Friday, especially for you? Because, you know, your son has said that he will not. Attending because your religion requires something, he had payload and you know, some Mondragón my friend I don't want to name because maybe she doesn't want me.

[01:15:08]

And she was laughing. She was like, I mean, she's an American citizen. She's been the most of what she was saying. Mandibular Casie class teacher amounted to a little game lega. But this is that, you know, because what if it is a religious thing? Will we be transgressing on that person? It is. So maybe no matter how ridiculous it sounds, give a holiday and then check with the mother. That is a true, if you have a doubt.

[01:15:28]

Now I get being that careful, but I also get someone laughing at the ridiculousness of it that an 11 year old child is smart enough to game the system, knowing that we are at such a level of political correctness that if I say that I belong to religion, that this Monday I have to go and watch the setting sun, you know, of next Statue of Liberty.

[01:15:48]

And then the teacher was going to think ten times Kibuye. If I say no, will I be pulled up for being insensitive to another religion? I just think it's got to that stage where a preadolescent child can game the system. Then I think there's something wrong. And I do think, you know, a lot of people have worked at professional organizations. I mean, everyone goes through ups and downs. It's no one person's grief is more than the other person's grief.

[01:16:14]

I don't recall in my working life people asking for leaves.

[01:16:18]

And it's not just about as you said you could. You could be grieve because a lot of things you could have seen in your life and now you could have come to often seen an accident.

[01:16:25]

I mean, you know, you see people I've seen a guy getting run over back when I used to work at Sepi, you know, there were a bunch of people I mean, they must be one person who saw that man cut in half with his head one way and body one way. No one in the office and said, you know what, I can't work.

[01:16:39]

I've seen something really horrible. And people respond to different things differently. I mean, you and I won't do the same thing differently. Sure. And our coping mechanisms are certainly different. I mean, I wouldn't be like if if there was a fighting or a bomb blast outside, I wouldn't reflect the same way you would because I come from a different context and are coping a little different.

[01:16:59]

You might not want to come to office tomorrow. I might. So I think it's different.

[01:17:03]

It goes from context to context is insensitive.

[01:17:07]

Also, I don't see it. I think I mean, I understand the teacher was sensitive, but isn't that just like a modern version of my tummy aches? My grandmother is sick. Yeah.

[01:17:17]

Yeah, it is. Excuse me. But the point is, you said that earlier, the teacher to go to the doctor and come back because that was that was an older guy then.

[01:17:26]

Right. Right. So, yeah, I don't know. I mean, I don't think there's any right or wrong.

[01:17:30]

I think that because there's been so much stigma attached to mental health and because there's just not enough conversation on it, people are a little touchy, not touchy, but people are particularly strong stance when it comes to mental health, taking care of it. Sufism is a part of it. So maybe it's a backlash to that and maybe it's fine.

[01:17:48]

But I think as a general principle, it's always better to be on the sensitive side. I mean, it doesn't hurt you, right? I mean, as long as it doesn't hurt anybody's feelings, it doesn't hurt. Sure.

[01:17:57]

Yeah. I don't think there's anything. Of course, being sensitive is a virtue, something that I understand you are going to say.

[01:18:04]

No, I think we need to know.

[01:18:06]

I think being sensitive is a virtue, just like being punched is a virtue. Now, I get pissed off, as you guys know, with people who are not punctual, but I will not color their entire overall. It just pisses me off if someone's not punctual, because for me, someone who is not punctual has a disrespect for other people's time. For me, that person thinks everybody is as well as I am because that person's ten minutes are valuable.

[01:18:30]

Maybe yours are not. I think that's disrespectful. Someone else may think being insensitive is disrespectful, but a lack of punctuality is not something I colored a person's character with. Generally, if this person is considered a paycheck, I agree that I am a seagull trying to be sensitive.

[01:18:46]

But what I'm saying is it's you see, it's not a virtue above and beyond other virtues. It's a virtue like any other virtue. Yeah, obviously. And I just think on a related subject, last week we discussed what's a New York columnist's body, which is very wise. I hadn't read her full letter. I read that letter while I am all for liberalism and I don't think so much for the conservatives, I don't have much sympathy for her based on that resignation.

[01:19:10]

I think that is a self-important media. If you can't deal with being unpopular, then do tofail.

[01:19:15]

No, I think we're mixing two things.

[01:19:17]

I mean, I think that I just think she's being too sensitive. I think if you are in a newsroom where people disagree with you, dig your heels in and continue your job.

[01:19:25]

You can't expect any lies by you do a lot of other things.

[01:19:27]

Also, I mean, it seems to claims.

[01:19:32]

Yeah, but on your own, on the mental health aspect, maybe maybe our views are outdated and we should accept that. Maybe we should accept she has a very short male high team.

[01:19:44]

I'm a huge content consumer. I thought I was the only one who got confused with one belt, one road that's over and one rank. One pension.

[01:19:52]

That's for the panel discussion. Proved me wrong is. Because I keep calling vulnerable, but I think this is because they were in the great discussion 2016 17 at the same time or up mostly newsstands and over and print media, the discussion should have been on or to get some more context on the topic. The site has improved a lot. I would like to see it increase in science related articles. I know it will be easy, but it's always good to ask some of your subscribers for that.

[01:20:20]

Not me. I'm not good at articulation. Friendly neighborhood citizen. Jim, thanks for your email and your suggestions.

[01:20:29]

We have a lot of emails and a lot of suggestions this time, but I don't think I'll be able to read all of them. We got like a record amount of e-mails. Now, let's end with this contempt of court context. President Bush and when he was given a contempt of court, how did it happen to notice that get what is the deal?

[01:20:45]

No, no. Is that some sort of note of two of the treats that he had done?

[01:20:50]

OK, so the court had taken note of it. So they said they said they are going to hear this case on this day. So this is put upon the notice in this case.

[01:21:00]

Somebody going to file a complaint against him?

[01:21:01]

No, it was a small. The Supreme Court and Supreme Court may see you need to tell him you need to pay from court and try to take this public to now he'll have to appear in the Supreme Court.

[01:21:14]

He appeared he has been served a short notice. So now he will respond to that show, cause notice after that, the real hearing is going to then the court will tell you why we should not take it. This is what you are saying, that why did you let it go? You have given your explanation and we see no merit in it. So what you have to say then, that face to face, face to face.

[01:21:36]

I see. So just for context, for the first day, no report. And apparently I don't know if it's true. Even I didn't know which tweet was the one that caused a problem.

[01:21:46]

There are a bunch of tweets that are had done in one of his tweets. He has written Court Rule of Supreme Court in the Destruction of democracy, unquote, in the last six years.

[01:21:57]

You talk about in one he said, quote, He keeps the SC in lockdown mode, unquote, while the chief justice for many, many, many more be better had.

[01:22:07]

And now I'm not sure which is the tweet that has got him this notice, I guess that will appear. But in the proceedings which are accepted, he had made a genuine mistake, prompting Venugopal to offer to withdraw his contempt. However, in the meantime, Bush has filed an application seeking Justice Marshall's recused on the bench, hearing the case for the central government remains firm about not withdrawing the plea. So I guess he said sorry, is that right?

[01:22:32]

Has he said sorry or no? He hasn't said sorry. So what is this genuine mistake? Sorry.

[01:22:37]

It's further that Harley Davidson motorcycle Voletta it only it's for the holidays and treat two treats on. So now they've clarified your for the Harley-Davidson tweet, two tweets.

[01:22:45]

One is that about administration, that democracy is weakened. This is the Harley-Davidson, the two. So even the Harley Davidson Street they've taken.

[01:22:54]

Now, this is a problem that I have.

[01:22:56]

And, you know, usually it was lower court judges that put contempt that if you have said something about me, you have said something about the court. It's not the same thing. What Mr. Chief Justice saying, escape Humalog mcguane, a poverty symbol, something I got a positive.

[01:23:13]

It's about a terrible year. I've also got a better idea. How can that be contempt of court?

[01:23:20]

And it's not even in his professional capacity. It's not even a comment on one of his judgments or anything that he does within the court. But that's always been the weird thing about the condemnation in India.

[01:23:29]

So you can criticize the judgments to high heaven. No problem. You can't say anything about the judge in particular. I mean, there are cases now what was that guy's name whose sons brought up morals and they live on Somervell.

[01:23:42]

I mean, that's everybody knows that corrupt. Right. But you can't do that if you say that you'll be hauled out on. The jury was jailed for that contempt of court because she apologized so she didn't have to serve the jail.

[01:23:53]

But, yeah, they had basically they had given them a jail.

[01:23:55]

Exactly. Contempt is a very outdated law. Yeah. In New York is not even in operation.

[01:24:03]

It's very colonialized precolonial. So so and here also I see, as I know, President Bush and I met him so many times, he has handled my story. Also that severe detective story in which they're afraid. Rumsfeld said they are just I think President Bush is the kind of guy who can even if you find something against his father, he will just blurt out an evil, evil tweet and he'll do anything.

[01:24:30]

So he may sometimes go overboard, especially now when the government has tamed, you know, the judges of high courts and the Supreme Court when when when nothing is, you know, going against the government. So many things are happening, but every decision is going in favor of, you know, the government. So in that context, I mean, this guy has become more brazen, Bush and Bush. So I have seen a change. In his tweets, he is tweeting anything he is he is really angry.

[01:25:03]

He's really angry. So also because because the system is such now, they are not so. So now that I see it more, you know, from the government angle, the government through judiciary is trying to tame, you know, such people, people like Bush and Bush and work publicly. I mean, they're very good people for public, for human rights. Right. So so. So that's how I see data.

[01:25:25]

That is I mean, it tells you about the quality, the character of people who start that this is the world's most powerful court anywhere in the world. No court in the world has as much power on compared to the people other than anybody else. And this is the level and we were talking about telling Uttar Pradesh to uphold the law of the land. I just think also there was this about the after the abrogation of 370, lots of cases came to the Supreme Court.

[01:25:54]

One case was about the arrest of lots of minors, illegal illegal detentions. Basically, I had missed it at the time. This happened in December 29th December, apparently. So the case came, petitioner said that minors are being illegally detained. They're not being arrested. They're not being charged with anything. They're being taken to the police station. And that was happening at the time, kept there for the day, left tomorrow. There you go again.

[01:26:15]

Guess what the Supreme Court said and I found this out today because I had missed it. They said, so what is the big deal? Police are taking them and keeping them there for a day and they'll bring them back. It's for their own good. It doesn't matter that these are illegal detentions. I mean, even if it's talking, some of them somebody. Yeah, what is illegal is illegal.

[01:26:33]

Look at the time they're going against the law now. It's very casual. Yeah.

[01:26:38]

Look at the timing. And today there's a very good at it, you know, in the Indian Express on this issue.

[01:26:45]

I mean, and very rightly pointed out, there was a case of habeas corpus in Kashmir when U.S. leaders were detained and the Supreme Court had no time to entertain those cases.

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They said, yeah, I'm digging it up.

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And in this case, I mean, when I look at when there is an epidemic and they have got time to take some sort of note of this to do it, even at that time, they took some note of some random cases and they were like, well, we don't have to do this.

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And what is what is this? I mean, look at the sensitivity of the the highest court that habeas corpus is.

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First, they didn't hear it for the longest time when they heard it all.

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The government you had one month to produce the video, which is against the Constitution, the whole idea of the window, the whole idea.

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It's ridiculous now, but even as the law exists now. So correct me if I'm wrong, but a while ago I had read the local I think on on news only I had written a piece on this or maybe it was some other platform. The law says that you cannot ascribe motive to the judge regarding a judgment. You can criticize a judgment, you can criticize a judge, but you cannot ascribe motive that this judge has given this judgment because he or she was paid or made a favor or did this.

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You can say, judge, because I imagine that the judge that's going raises the question that the judge is not like he does what Primitivo or you can say your judgment is about the Aquitania. As long as I'm not ascribing motive, yabut motive guys that ascribe the motive, then it is a report.

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If you ascribe a motive and if it is your opinion, then it is against. But if you if they I find if I look at a judgement and I see this judge, why did he deliver this judgement? So I look into his records.

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I do reporting that that's contempt that they go and that is the thing.

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So this says this thing, right? Like almost every legal concept, they have interpreted it in the broadest possible terms. So anything can be Amodeo describing a mode. If you say judges on a bike which is owned by a BJP person, that's a Modi, you are saying they can say you are implying that he is whatever Bordier the BJP.

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If I'm saying that a judge has a primitive mind and I'm implying that you can interpret it any way, that is the problem.

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That's how it has been interpreted over the last few years. Every everything under the sun.

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And if you say, well, the judge goes under, don't go by the spirit of the Constitution and spirit of the democracy, then I think most judges will ignore such that they won't be so many appointed notices.

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But President Bush can raise them up quite a bit. It's not the first time that he's gotten into this is the second time.

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The second group, the first is still pending. Whether the day the Supreme Court, I would say, had no courage at that time to, you know, and that contempt, they haven't otherwise they should have folded it within two months.

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And that's also because how many other lawyers, you know, who actually speak about this President Bush on is one tough cookie. I have a couple of other emails. I can't like I said, we have a lot of e-mails. Guys, I'm sorry, I can't read all of them out, although I have read them. There's this one really long line about from one of my subscribers from Tallangatta. It's from some of our show, even if you don't read on the podcast, consider the suggestions.

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So. Yes, I've read your email. We shall definitely I will share it with the team. And you've spoken about, of course, Telangana, that it was not an event. It was a movement of a lot, a long time. So fine. Point taken. Thank you so much for this email. I have read it. I shall share it to the team as well. Then we have another couple of suggestions from a bunch of emails.

[01:30:22]

One suggestion is that we should tell up in advance like this half that we should know who is going to be the guest next after so that subscribers can send in their questions. And it is possible. How when do I have to guess confirm? Is it like just the day before, two days before it gets canceled?

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Also, I think next week we know now we are getting Sooraj next week. So so we next week at least we can we then something may happen, then we change it.

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Basically what happens is that while I think that does have a list of people who he has kind of reached out to invited, if there's a big event, then we would want someone from that area expertise, China, our defense matters of extremism. And sometimes a person confirms that can make it and promises to come the next week. So that person does come but can't make it on that day, because some of our guests are also reporters in their own capacity.

[01:31:07]

And they have to be, you know, pulled out to do some other stuff. But we shall try to do this as often as we can. And a huge appreciation is coming for Manisha you last nuisance episode of Stonnington at five with John Oliver.

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Oh, how we laughed. 100 episodes cannot be conducted in a similar manner.

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John Oliver, which is a 15 minute and 15, 20 minute on a serious issue, like if we're going to rethink, we are going to sit and think about what we're going to do after the 100th episode.

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So, yeah, on my famous holiday, so so, so many of the Alps and the Alps, but actually getting a holiday.

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No, no, she's not you.

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I am saying no, I am going. Do you have anything to catch me? Because basically I can sit on the banks of Indians.

[01:31:52]

I'm not going to say fine then after line.

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I mean, what is that right now? Is that because I mean. No, I mean, it's basically settler colonial project.

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For all practical purposes, one can buy property also. Yeah.

[01:32:11]

So thank you so much.

[01:32:12]

Subscriber's you guys are going a lot of inputs, a lot of suggestions and critique and criticism which is all welcome.

[01:32:19]

Thank you so much. Please don't stop giving us critique and feedback that you think would make us better. For one, I promise to try and be more sensitive. I generally think it is a virtue that is worth aspiring for. I don't think it is pointless. I think it makes you a better person. But every now and then, if we're told what we are doing wrong and right, it helps us. If we have anything else you want to discuss, we can.

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Otherwise we can write up with the discussion. I have a very special song for people up there that I'm going to end with today.

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You can guess it's been be Punjabi, so recommendations for the week.

[01:32:50]

Ladies and gents, I will recommend this article, which I think early this week or last week be. You know, he said it how the state has launched legal assassination of, you know, people like Vasudeva and the right. So damned good story. Very good.

[01:33:13]

That's very good.

[01:33:16]

OK, there's a report on Kashmir on the impact of the last year of Low-down in Kashmir, and it's been prepared by this forum for human rights in Jammu and Kashmir. It includes Pomerol or Ramachandra Guha, Major General Ashok Matar Edwards, Marshall Kobilka, just as Bilal Norske, Gopal Pillay, the former home secretary. And there is Morada Kumar, who is a former interlocutor and justice mother and blogger of the Supreme Court, who recently died. So they prepared a report.

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And it is I mean, it's beyond depressing what has happened, just the economy, parliament, with all the loss to life and property and everything for five point three billion dollars, that's about 40000 crore that has been lost in the last one year because of the crackdown and the logging on and everything.

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Oh, the apple industry, which is like our greatest source of income alone, has lost about twenty two thousand Crooge because they couldn't get to the Mundy's on time and everything. But the report is not yet out. It's not. I mean, it's out. It's not online. So I'll just send our link to a story which talks about this. You can check it out. I think the report will be online soon.

[01:34:22]

So we should not just consultants. Goldfinger's also eerily similar to the Central West project. So you know where that money is going. Maneesha Shawanda.

[01:34:31]

So once again, we call Speace India's and real estate. Why you still can't afford to buy that home. Bookmarked it on a laptop, preferably because it's better reading experience and a piece by Robert Wright.

[01:34:44]

Since we were talking about this, why is everyone so mean to Barry Vice right vis a race?

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How do you know? It's an interesting piece.

[01:34:53]

I don't agree with all of it, but it's still interesting a. The psychology of tribalism, I have a recommendation, which I mean, I don't know, this is borderline. You can be tried for recommending something. You can probably hold up for submission for recommending something like this. But before I do, I'll explain. Before I come to that recommendation, I would recommend everyone listening in, since we are trying to make this website a completely smooth, friction free experience for our subscribers and even non subscribers, because not all the content is behind a paywall for that duration.

[01:35:26]

We can put that paywall up because it would make the experience very budgeters. We have sorted all those issues out during that time. It is very disheartening when many of you just don't subscribe, because what that shows is that unless one pulls it behind the paywall laughter you don't think the rest of the stuff is worth paying for. And that is actually why news only exists. Haftar is just a side product. It's the byproduct that comes out. It's not the main oil.

[01:35:49]

It's the plastic that's coming from from manufacturing, petroleum and diesel from crude. So do continue to subscribe even while we are fixing up payment.

[01:35:59]

Gateway and firewalls are not paywalls because we do have to continue to pay salaries.

[01:36:04]

We have to continue to pay rent. And we'd like to reward people who do good work well and not always pay. If you want to become rich, go become a politician, you know, you should just be comfortable.

[01:36:16]

I'm not saying you have to buy them Porsches, but surely you can pay for news if you're consuming it. Also, there's an email that I got which the title is. It's particular.

[01:36:26]

Shravani has said she's a huge fan of Hafter, her husband, and she's listening to it.

[01:36:32]

Although her husband is a fan, she clearly is not yet. So thank you for your mail.

[01:36:38]

I you know, because we've lost time, I can't read out the whole mail. But you said it's, you know, really unfortunate when you have to listen to people that are ignored instead of Tamilnadu or Canada instead of Canada.

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And it's you said that it's often a disrespect of all regional language of people. If you can't pronounce the names correctly and you said that, you know, it has to do with you don't respect people of that region. You will be disappointed and very depressed to know that I'm half damaged.

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My mother is a Tamilian from Turnell.

[01:37:05]

Really, you know, my dad's Punjabi, so I don't think it's a suspect. Yes, it's not all bad. It just reminded me like this bad advice. It's this wise. I don't know. And I don't get offended when a Westerner, you know, when I go for panels, you know, whenever I'm invited internationally, they can't pronounce my name.

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I mean, I've been from abusive. I stuck my neck out. I found no evidence of damage. So it's not a disrespect. You know, sometimes it just doesn't roll off the line.

[01:37:32]

There you go. No, you may not know what it is. So you can correct the person and the person can just learn instead of just saying, well, this is if if that person doesn't learn, even that's OK.

[01:37:41]

I mean, also I mean, different languages have different words, different pronunciations for the same thing. Right. I mean, for in Kashmiri I can't see Tamil Nadu. I mean, I can but ah, this thing is different, right.

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In Urdu, in Persian and other language it'll be a different thing.

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So no disrespect meant. It's just that, you know, things roll off the tongue. We get used to certain things. We should try to, you know, I guess pronounce everything correctly. But it's just I may not be able to do that.

[01:38:08]

Yeah, it's tough.

[01:38:09]

So my recommendation is this podcast is the bonus podcast on NPR, Planet Money. It's called the Kerner Commission. And I just tell you why I'm saying that today's day and age, it may be dangerous to suggest something like this. The Kerner Commission was actually set up by President Lyndon B. Johnson following what is called a long, hot summer of 1967.

[01:38:30]

Like now that, you know, the average age Floyds murder, this whole police reforms became a big deal at that time because you couldn't ignore it.

[01:38:38]

It was a riot that had spread across cities across America. So he set up a commission to answer what happened to cause the protests, why did they happen and what should be done. And this was basically because, again, the police officers had like it was one particular case that triggered it, of course, you know, killing a black man unfairly. I was a woman in this case.

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But the important part for this is that the commission that was set up, it had, I think, nine members. The vice chairman was the mayor of New York City. The chairman of the commission was actually a conservative who wanted to be elevated as a judge. So, you know, the president to have a hold on him. The commission, when it submitted its report, they were afraid that it be buried.

[01:39:18]

So they leaked it to The Washington Post first. And what really angered President Johnson was that this commission had eight or maybe ten people, nine white members and one black when they went to the ghettos to see how the black folks live and what they have to deal with. Many of them started empathizing with them having taken to violence. And this was a commission set up by the president of the United States, which borderline justified the violence. And they said we will not call it a riot because when you close all avenues of protest, violence is the only avenue you have left.

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And I think it's fascinating that this commission could submit such a report in a country and widely keep critics.

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And we're going to keep doing this, and I've said this many times, me, the Commie left me the Che Guevara poster boy, me, all that thing. I have said that several times. America is and in the foreseeable future will continue to be the greatest country in the world, because this is the kind of self-confidence the institutions have in themselves that they can put out such a thing. And all nine people were not put into president. The Supreme Court said, they have said.

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And in contrast, you must see what is happening in India times. And again, I have seen the government spokespersons and government spokesperson. Yes, I mean, bureaucrats and say say among the bureaucracy, the police spokesperson and BJP, of course, they are holding shambolic responsible for northeast France, which has no damaged right now.

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They are building it up. They are. And times and again, I have seen the daily police talking like that.

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And I've seen I mean, even though it was a Democratic I mean, forget that Bema pointing out the guys who did the violence in the country after being justice activists who have been arrested, languishing in jail for two years now.

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I think what this piece demonstrates is that in a democracy, if you shut down every institution and compromise every institution and every pipeline for protest or, you know, correction or reform, then you only live one line open. And that's never a good thing for any country society. On that note, thank you, panel.

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Thank you. Bye bye.

[01:41:35]

I would like to dedicate this song to Chief Minister de de de de de de de la Liga. Tonight, the Senate has collapsed and they can't afford to pass these, not about the budget Punjabi. B, b, b, b, b, b, b. Sorry, it's just it's a big Festivus display, but just the number one down Main Street.

[01:42:36]

Now, we went down when we went down, we watched all the news, laundry podcasts are available on Stitcher, iTunes and any other podcast platform.

[01:42:50]

Please subscribe to News Laundry, help us keep news.

[01:42:53]

Independents, you got all our podcast on news, pop culture, current affairs and sport visits, Newsround dot com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to our YouTube channel.