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[00:00:01]

This is Nick, this is Jack, and this is Snax Daily. It is Wednesday, August twenty six snackers. It's a lucky day because this is the best one yet to be. Oh, why, Jack, what have we got for our first story? Jordache stock is being delivered to public stock markets hetta this year, basically wedding season for IPOs.

[00:00:20]

For our second story as Amazon rose, Wall Street left Best Buy stock out for dead on the sidewalk outside the New York Stock Exchange, but instead ending up for sale for like nothing on Craigslist.

[00:00:31]

Best Buy stock is at a record high for our third and final story. If you've popped a can of anything this summer, then you are a baller. We're talking ball corp.

[00:00:41]

It's leading the illumine effect of food and drinks, but its stock wasn't ready for the moment.

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Before we hit those three fantastic stories, we need to alert the snackers that we are experiencing the earliest ever return of Aless. Yeah, apparently weather's getting warmer earlier, but cozy pumpkin spice is coming earlier too. Sounds like it's opposite day. It's kind of like a climate change thing, I think. Now Dunkin Donuts is rival beats Starbucks this year launching their own pumpkin spiced coffee on August 19th. Jack and I check the calendars. That is two days earlier than Dunkin announced.

[00:01:17]

The same pumpkin spice last year. Feels like a low block. Dunkin's product strategy is due same thing as last year, but 48 hours earlier this time, exactly how Starbucks saw that happen. Howard Schultz choked on a scone. No, after that, after he recovered from the scone injury, he put on a cable knit sweater and moved up his launch by two days. Also, just like Dunkin Donuts to yesterday, yesterday. And according to snacker Eric Isen, this is the earliest we've ever seen a weather pattern.

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We talked to a couple of seismologists. We've never seen Pessl. Season begins. Osier doesn't happen, not ordinary. Now, apparently, a scalding hot latte beverage is perfect for ninety three degree August. Is this the humidity or is that the cream? Oh, it's the cream.

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By the way, speaking of Dunkin, we mentioned Dunkin Donuts is new beer collaboration with Harpoon Brewery.

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Shea Darlene, this guy wants an extra pump of hazelnut and his beer.

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Three story you tuned in this next daily. He spoke to the lawyers and we got to get some illegal out of the way about the Henry food is said Candy. They don't reflect the views of the rabbi, her family. It's all formational. Just so you know, we're not recommending any securities. No, it's not a research report or investment advice, not an offer of a sale of a security by Nexxus Digestible Business News for your family finances LLC member Fembot ABC.

[00:02:44]

For our first story door just had its biggest week of its life, including a hidden product. And it's not the only tech company rushing to IPO because the weather is perfect right now for IPOs.

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A lot of rings getting put on it now. Dorje dash her. Jack and I tell General Motors the other day to like, do less.

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And they're like, no, we're going to do more. We do a lot more. There is like one out of every two conservatives these days is getting delivered by door. She's micro. That's right. Jordache has fifty percent of the mail delivery market in the United States. Now, datasheet recognizes it's got fifty percent of the delivery market right now. So it's added convenience store and pharmacy delivery just this year. But Jordache execs are like, hold on, guys.

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We're not just working an eight hour day now and I work five more hours because we're going to add grocery delivery right now because this is our moment. That's key because insta card, Amazon, they're doing grocery delivery, but they stick you with like, what are you ordering tonight, by the way, Jack?

[00:03:41]

Cauliflower, asparagus and garlic sauce. Yeah well Estacado going to give you the old five p.m. to nine p.m. window and they'll probably drop it off at 10 p.m. post dinner. And again we mentioned the Jordache execs are aggressive. They have announced they're doing one hour delivery for grocery orders. That's insane. Oh and because they want to do more and more, they've raised four hundred million dollars this year, hit a six billion dollar valuation. And Jack according to WHTM, what did we just hear?

[00:04:07]

Their stocks are coming to public stock markets by this year. Twenty, twenty, twenty twenty, according to people familiar with the matter. So that's what everybody can see if they like Google Dorda right now.

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That's the headline you're going to see. Really nice.

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But what excites Jaconi is what you don't see, the hidden platform, which is Dorotea side hustle. Yeah, it turns out this door dash side hustle is their technology that powers grocery delivery, which they don't keep to themselves. They're also licensing their core delivery and logistics technology to other stores to use for themselves if they don't want to be in is that classic white labeling situation. But instead of almond butter, we're dealing with software. We actually just saw an article on Etre Dotcom.

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It is rumored that Trader Joe's is crunchy, crispy chocolate chip cookies, delicious, actually made by Tait's of Southhampton, which happened to be crunchy and crispy chocolate chip cookies. And it turns out the deli. You're getting from Wal-Mart that's actually made by Doordarshan. Yeah, we learned that the critical step for Door to attract America's huge grocery chains was giving them its huge grocery technology. Wal-Mart wants to do delivery, but they don't want to play the rat race of being on the door to having people compare Wal-Mart to Target, to Wegmans to see it's like a stuffy on air conditioned elevator in their Wal-Mart wants their own app.

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So door dash drive is basically door dashes, logistics and delivery technology, but it runs on Wal-Mart's own app. So Wal-Mart gets to slap its own brand on its delivery app. And Jordache technology can handle the rest. And Jordache isn't UNICEF. So they're charging for this, which is why it's Jordache. This nice little side hustle business. Couldn't have said it better, Jack. So, Jack, what's the takeaway for our buddies over at Doordarshan? We are experiencing the IPO wedding season this fall and winter snackers.

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It's Wednesday. First thing, Jack and I open up. Bridal Guide. Twenty twenty. Jack, what are the three most popular months to get married this year? I didn't know this because I got married in August, but apparently it's June, September and October. You got the early summer in the early fall. If you're going to commit to an outdoor ceremony, you pick the best weather. The same goes for IPO's. When you're going to commit to publicly traded stock for the first time, you go with the best financial whether you want to IPO.

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When the investor birds are chirping and mutual funds are loving, the sun's out, guns out. Beautiful stock market, whether it's like poetry.

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Now, in the first half of twenty twenty, it was basically raining on Wall Street because a coronavirus or IPOs got canceled. But today there is a window of sunshine as stock markets reach record highs across the board. And that's why Dorda just moved up its IPO date. And five other tech companies, including Azana, also announced on Monday that they're going to IPO hopefully before the end of the year. They think now is the time to get down on one knee and unleash their stock on the New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ, because they think now is the right market for them to get a high stock price when they do.

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For our second story, Best Buy was left for dead by Wall Street, but now Best Buy is stronger than. Full disclosure here, Jack and I trying to find the perfect analogy for Best Buy. We thought of a couple of options.

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Well, we could have gone with Cinderella or like Rudy Ruediger would have a nice but a more original take is like Lance Armstrong. But then we realized Lance Armstrong kind of disqualified from being considered an on snacks.

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Daly Now he's starting at the bottom.

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Yes, he did. And then he got seven tainted tours. De France doesn't work in the podcast circles these days, but snackers Best Buy slogan clearly has Amazon in mind. AIJAC not like back of the mind, right? Best Buy slogan has Amazon in the very front of its mind, its aggressive borderline stalking. Here's what it is. Expert service, unbeatable price. Here's what Best Buy's promising consumers. We will match Amazon's prices, which everyone knows is industry lowest and provide humans for better service than Amazon can.

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Now, it sounds too good to be true. So we decided to jump into the no snack style. But apparently it's not too good to be true. Here's what's wild. Best Buy stores were closed in March and April and May, and it was deemed non-essential, even though IT stores were deemed non-essential and were shut down. So insulting Best Buy managed to increase its revenues last quarter, which is incredible. We repeat they increased revenues even though stores were closed.

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Here's how.

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If you went to Best Buy dotcom on like April 15th, it would show you that all of its locations are closed. However, all nine hundred seventy seven locations had activated curbside pickup so you could order online and go pick it up, activate curbside pickup. That is an incredible logistics pivot to one of the best non holiday quarters ever for Best Buy. That's right. Usually Best Buy's performance requires Santa Claus to impress investors. He's critical, but now you just need a curb next to this tree.

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It's so simple snackers. Here's the key about stocks. If a stock sinks, it's because investors think the profits will fall and not grow. But investors can be wrong. Comebacks can happen. Situations for companies can change. Case in point, we got ourselves here. Twenty twelve Best Buy stock was a mere eleven bucks a share. Since then, Best Buy has proven a ton of people wrong at its share price. Shouldn't have been so low over the last six months.

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It is the only place where you're going to get video gaming and computers and home entertainment. ASKAP The only issue with Best Buy is you don't want to walk in there with a blue polo shirt because they're going to be like, excuse me, where is the appliances for whatever? And you're going to be like, I'm never going to wear this shirt ever again. Sony pixel ratio's. I'm sorry, I don't work here. During the Korean economy, products like chrome books and appliances like freezers have sold out because Best Buy is the only place you can get it fast.

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You're trying to snag that, you know, like seventy two inch TV, two day prime shipping, not going to be fast enough for that to Amazon Prime isn't going to send Toby from the Geek Squad to install your Dolby surround sound stereo, which you needed for last night's move.

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And that's why snackers in twenty twelve Best Buy stock was eleven dollars. Today it's one hundred and eleven dollars we checked with. The anti-doping society best bypassed all its tests, urine test, this thing. So, Jack, what's the takeaway for our buddies over at Best Buy? Any company that survives covid-19 is probably better off today than they were before covid snackers since the pandemic started. It is a battle of retail attrition out there. This is crucial to understand because it's transformed our economy in profound ways.

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Insane numbers here, snackers, get this. Eighty thousand small businesses have permanently closed from March 1st to July 5th, according to you. And if you just look at the shopping and retail industry, twenty six thousand businesses that used to compete with Best Buy were open on March 1st, but are closed today.

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And the wild thing is that the devastation to small and medium businesses across America is actually this huge boon to the big corporations.

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Case in point, consulting company Deloitte recently surveyed the CEOs of 100 large American corporations.

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Yes, 60 percent of them are more confident in their company's growth today than they were before covid. And we're still mid pandemic. How could that possibly be that CEOs are more confident post covid than there were before when things were seemingly really good?

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Basically, covid has improved the business outlook for America's biggest corporations simply because its smallest corporations are gone. Sad, but critical.

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Not to forget that for our third and final story, this one's wild without ball corporation. You don't get LeCroy, you don't get Wikler and you don't get annys.

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Creamy tomato bubble corp stock was not ready for the aluminum Palouse of the current economy, which leads us to the weirdest Korean economy megatrend beside like the surge in lavender sales for aluminum cans, less everything else snackers.

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You're not Posten up at the cocktail bar saying Hagar's song An Apple sprits for one over here. And you're not asking Jennifer for another pint of Switchback IPA because you're not seeing Jennifer these days instead of you and not Jennifer apparently are getting that concocted.

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Six pack of some vodka and soda mix from the grocery store that came in like a bunch of cans, or you're going to like the wine store and grabbing a three pack of rosé, which also comes in aluminum cans. Now, snackers, because Jackanory human, we know you can't just drink things. You have to eat things, too. But you're also not grabbing the half sandwich and tomato soup combo over at Panera these days.

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You're cracking open another Ani's creamy tomato soup from the pantry, which comes in another aluminum can, which brings us to Ball Corp, which stands to benefit from the aluminum fixation of the drinking and eating habits of American snack.

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As we're talking ball corporation based in Colorado, the leader when it comes to aluminum cans in the United States, South Park episodes in aluminum cans.

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That's what central Colorado does.

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And we're doing a little experiment on snacks daily. If you are drinking out of aluminum cans right now, look at the label. Scroll your eyes down to like the small part of the cans back essential right next to the barcode. You're probably going to see a little ball tattoo written there. It's written kind of like a baseball players autograph, 12 ounce soda cans, white class Olympic cans, Campbell's soup cans, pop tart cans. They've all got this ball.

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OK, now we're looking at this company. We assume the stock's ticker symbol is Zha or can would make too much sense. That's what they're supposed to do. Turns out legal was probably involved in the decision, though.

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So it's be exactly the situation. Oh, by the way, when Jack and I were researching this company, Ball apparently also has a second division that doesn't do cans for sodas. They do high tech aerospace, 16 percent of their business is aerospace. It's a classic corporate non sequitur.

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Yeah, it does make sense. They're also doing satellites, doesn't fit with the aluminum can business that much.

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Kind of looks like they might want to split that up into a separate company because it doesn't belong next to the aluminum cans and the lawyers will definitely name that ball industries.

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So Nick Balls, enjoying a once in a lifetime spike in demand for aluminum cans must be nice, but sales fell last quarter somehow.

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So, Jack, what's the takeaway for our buddies over at ball? Perfect business opportunities can be missed if you're not ready. Snackers Jack and I covered most, of course, just a couple of months ago. And the big complaint in their earnings was they're running out of cans. If you bring your own containers to their breweries, they'll probably let you take as much Coors Light as you want because they have a surplus of beer and a shortage of cans.

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It's going to be over there. Meanwhile, Coca Cola just suspended production of its minut made zero sugar lemonade because it needs to use those cans for more popular drink cans.

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Right now, Ball should be raising prices on their aluminum cans and popping glass bottles to celebrate record sales. But Ball wasn't ready for this. It's like still opening up to factories in Texas and Georgia A.S.A.P. to try to keep up. It's scrambling to increase production to meet this unexpected demand.

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Ball is literally buying cans from around the world instead of making its own cans right now, which is a problem.

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This was a perfect growth opportunity. Bubble was already at max capacity they weren't ready for. Four more dropped the ball, jack, and you'll whip up the takeaways for us over there, Jordache thinks it's the perfect time for an IPO. It was raining in the first half of twenty. Twenty sun's out and this one's out. The second half of twenty twenty four that gets our Best Buy was written off for dead by Wall Street back in twenty twelve.

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But it's proven Amazon proof and its stock has 10 Xed since twenty twelve for a third and final story.

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Ball Corp is the aluminum can company and aluminum cans are having a moment which ball wasn't ready for.

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Now time for our snack fact. This one sent in by a legendary snack bar snack or Michelle Beckwith in lovely Houston, Texas.

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Nick Michelle heard our story about BlackBerry the other day and wondered if we knew where the name BlackBerry came from. Full disclosure, we didn't. Apparently when BlackBerry launched in nineteen ninety nine, they decided to hire a California based marketing firm to invent a new name for this new product. And this California based marketing firm had quite a track record because they came up with the name of Swiffer, that lovely little mop that's so much more easy to use than normal.

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And they also did Coca Cola's Dasani water and Verizon's Feio. So they're good with coming up with random things.

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So they looked at a BlackBerry and they thought to themselves, you know, the keys on this keyboard kind of look like the little dimples. I'm like a raspberry. They're really annoying, but they're very delicious looking. So somebody is like, let's call it strawberry. Yeah, because the keys kind of make it look like a fruit. But then they thought the straw was like two drawn out and then someone said, let's go with BlackBerry and BlackBerry stuck.

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Now Snackers before we go, congrats to Afghani and many snackers who just moved in together into a new apartment in Brooklyn.

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And congrats on graduation, Mickey Molalla from Arlington, Virginia. Sawyer and Addison are starting high school and college senior years in Utah. Jim and Catherine Majano, happy first year anniversary at Rochester, New York. Dr. Lee's working hard on the front lines in Hawaii and Maui. Sounds like a TV show. And then Snacker Birthday is kicking it off with Chris Jordan in Palo Alto, California, and Julian Castro Bay in St. Peters, Missouri. Rejon Patel in Houston, Texas County.

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Gambell, also in Houston, Texas. Right down the street, Val Laroche, happy. Twenty seventh over in Boston, and Matt Silvo Bolívar, Ohio. And finally, James Shepard, Newnan, Georgia. Happy birthday, Sneck Snackers. We all want to keep growing snacks. Or remember to tell your friends h why h why it means have you had your snacks daily? I can't wait to see you tomorrow if you know you now. This is Jack, I own stock of Amazon, the Robinhood Snacks podcast you just heard reflects the opinions of only the hosts who are associated persons of Robinhood Financial LLC and does not reflect the views of Robinhood Markets Inc or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates.

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The podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as a recommendation to buy or sell any security and is not an offer or sale of a security. The podcast is also not a research report and is not intended to serve as the basis of any investment decision. Robin Hood Financial LLC member, FINRA, SIPC.