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[00:00:00]

So after all of our dissing of Delaware here last week, was there even a little bit of a buzz there? Did Delaware in the end prove you and us wrong, Brian? Yeah, actually.

[00:00:13]

And I have to say, where the convention took place was a place called the Chase Convention Center. It was down by a riverside. It's a nice part of Delaware. Lots of shops, bars and restaurants around there. The convention center itself, Jackie, was like a fortress. A massive steel fence had been erected around the whole thing. Secret Service police patrolling it. Nobody was getting anywhere near Joe Biden. We knew we were never going to be in the room with him as he made the speech, but it was even difficult to get into the car park of the convention center.

[00:00:41]

But in the end, what they did was and I thought it worked, they invited Biden supporters in to drive their cars into the car park.

[00:00:50]

They could park in the car park of the convention center and watch the convention speech on a big screen. It was like a kind of an old drive in movie theater and then a big, big fireworks display afterwards outside socially distant, responsible covid era. But it was still a celebration that was still a bit of a buzz. Yes, there was.

[00:01:07]

I don't know if you've seen videos coming from Ireland, but a lot of people in Ireland are actually playing bingo that way. They're driving up to their local car park beep in the hall.

[00:01:18]

And if they win a line or get a full house and that's how they're doing it. So that's the image I had in my mind when you were talking about a car park full of people, to be honest. Very good.

[00:01:29]

It's a shame they couldn't do a drive Golf Society dinner in Galway and maybe the government wouldn't be in the trouble they're in right now. But we're all learning, I guess.

[00:01:42]

From Auti News, this is states of mind, this American carnage be fired back with rubber bullets, stops right here and stops right now.

[00:02:04]

I do not believe we're the dark, angry nation that Donald Trump sees in his tweets in the middle of the night.

[00:02:12]

Your US Election 2020 podcast with Brian O'Donovan in Washington and Jackie Fox in Dublin today.

[00:02:22]

Good evening. I'm Eva Longoria, Boston, and welcome to the twenty 20 Democratic National Convention.

[00:02:28]

This administration has shown it will tear our democracy down. The future of our democracy is at stake.

[00:02:35]

And here's the thing. We can do better. Joe Biden will be a president. We will all be proud to salute history, be able to say that the end of this chapter of American doctors began here tonight. Gosh, it was all very swish, wasn't it? Almighty God, we confess that our nation needs you and has always needed just to be the.

[00:03:10]

Oh. Maybe it was naive of me to believe that the virtual DNC wouldn't be this slick.

[00:03:24]

Yes, it felt political, but it also felt very personal.

[00:03:28]

Yeah, it was personal. And on the production side, I thought it was very well made. It consisted of a series of short, little snappy video messages, prerecorded, slickly produced videos, graphics, music. It went quite well. I think, you know, these virtual things that could have been this Zoome Skype car crash, that everything was sort of freezing and leeching and delayed. It all moved very smoothly, as I say. Very well produced, easily controlled.

[00:03:51]

I guess when it's in that sort of environment that it is a lot of it is prerecorded, some live elements, some little cues missed, you know. Q You're on. And that might be a pause for a second or two and then the speaker starts speaking. But all in all, it went very well. Some very well-known big name celebrities there, some funny introductions from actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

[00:04:11]

Just remember, Joe Biden goes to church so regularly that he doesn't even need tear gas and a bunch of federalized troops to help him get there.

[00:04:20]

We also had musical performances from the likes of John Legend and Billy Eilish. That's how it looked and it did look very well, as you said, I saw a tweet from David Axelrod that David Guggenheim, who is an award winning documentary filmmaker, made some of those short videos. And you could definitely tell, but that was the style. What about the substance now that it's all over? There were a few messages that we can take from this week, cool, calm and collected.

[00:04:56]

A man able to take the reins during what is an unpredictable time and a person with humility and empathy, but with a character to lead. That's how the Democratic Party wanted to show Joe Biden as this week.

[00:05:12]

Yeah, and lots of these videos were about getting to know Joe and the stories that a lot of people know, but not everyone would know. His first wife and young daughter killed in a car crash. His son Beau dying of cancer in 2015. Real tragedy in his life. Those nice personal stories showing the warmth, showing the empathy, showing the character that is Joe Biden. One of the viral moments even before we got to Joe Biden's big acceptance speech was a young boy called Braiden Harington.

[00:05:37]

He has a stutter and he spoke about how Joe Biden helped him with his daughter. Joe Biden has spoken in the past about overcoming stuttering himself.

[00:05:45]

Hi, my name is Peyton Harrington and I'm 13 years old. And without Joe Biden, I wouldn't be talking to you today. About a few months ago, I met him in New Hampshire.

[00:05:56]

He told me that we were members of the same club we started out.

[00:06:08]

It was really amazing to hear that someone like me became vice president. He told me about a book of poems by her. She read aloud to practice. He showed me how he Marks's addresses to make them easier to say out loud. So I did the same thing today.

[00:06:34]

And it wasn't just Braydon Harrington giving these glowing reports of Joe Biden.

[00:06:38]

Of course, we had it from the likes of Michelle Obama, and he will govern as someone who's lived a life that the rest of us can recognize.

[00:06:46]

When he was a kid, Joe's father lost his job. When he was a young senator, Joe lost his wife and his baby daughter and when he was vice president, he lost his beloved son. So Joe knows the anguish of sitting at a table with an empty chair and then one of the nicer speeches definitely of the four nights came from Joe Biden's wife, Dr. Jill Biden. She delivered an address from inside the high school where she used to teach.

[00:07:14]

And she spoke about, again, the personal tragedies, the loss that Joe Biden had overcome in his life. And she said if he can fix a broken family, he can fix a broken country.

[00:07:25]

You know, motherhood came to me in a way I never expected. I fell in love with a man and two little boys standing in the wreckage of unthinkable loss, mourning a wife and mother, a daughter and sister I never imagined. At the age of twenty six, I would be asking myself, how do you make a broken family? Hold still. Joe always told the boys Mommy sent Jill to us and how could I argue with her? And so we figured it out together in those big moments that would go by too fast.

[00:08:08]

Speaking of Jill Biden, I don't know if you saw this, Brian, but I think my favorite moment of the week involved her when her grand daughters ratted her out in a video which was supposed to be an insight into her life, that she is really full of mischief.

[00:08:23]

We have a lot of stories. Yeah, she's a prankster, very mischievous. Like when she goes on a run and I'm like a dead snake and she'll pick it up and put it in a bag and she'll use it to scare someone. She seems like Ray Kroc.

[00:08:39]

And fairness, another message by Jill Biden. Snakes and Joe Biden's ability to show he's a human being was unity, that the Democrats are now stronger than ever, appealing to all factions within the party, but also ready to take on new recruits. Kamala Harris as vice presidential nominee. She was trying to appeal to minority groups and women while we saw Bernie Sanders in his speech hinting that Joe Biden could move a bit to the left to appeal to progressives.

[00:09:09]

Joe supports raising the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour. This will give 40 million workers a pay raise and push the wage scale up for everyone else. Joe will also make it easier for workers to join unions, create 12 weeks of paid family leave, fund universal pre-K for three and four year olds, and make childcare affordable for millions of families.

[00:09:38]

While former Republican Governor John Kasich his speech at a literal crossroads.

[00:09:44]

Sometimes elections represent a real choice, a choice we make as individuals and as a nation about which path we want to take when we've come to challenging times.

[00:09:54]

America is at a crossroads today, and it is he trying to reassure those more at the center or conservative that Joe Biden would not be radical in leftist politics.

[00:10:06]

I'm sure there are Republicans and independents who couldn't imagine crossing over to support a Democrat. They fear Joe may turn sharp left and leave them behind. I don't believe that because I know the measure of the man. It's reasonable, faithful, respectful, and, you know, no one pushes Joe around. Yeah.

[00:10:27]

And it was, as you say, all about to try to unify those centrist parts of the party with the left and progressive sides of the party. And one of the big left progressive figures is, of course, a Ossy Alexandrea or Cosio Cortez.

[00:10:39]

She spoke one of the nights, sparked a little bit of controversy. And it wasn't really of her own making it very confusing, wasn't it?

[00:10:45]

It was confusing, Jackie. Yeah. Her role that night was to formally nominate Bernie Sanders and maybe think, well, what did she do that he wasn't the candidate? Bernie Sanders was still a candidate. He was still on the ballot paper.

[00:10:57]

So technically, the rules of the Democratic convention are if you're on the ballot paper, somebody has to nominate you. Somebody has to second you, and then you put forward this candidate for election. Nobody we knew he wasn't going to be the nominee. Everybody knew that. But Aoki's rule was to formally nominate him. She got some flack on Twitter immediately afterwards, people saying, what is she doing? Why is she nominating Bernie Sanders? Why isn't she backing Joe Biden?

[00:11:17]

She sort of to clarify on Twitter. Well, actually, this was my technical role. I was supposed to do this. It was kind of a symbolic thing. It was a procedural thing. It was part of the convention, I will say, to criticize her on one point. She could have mentioned Joe Biden in her speech. She did not. She only spoke about Bernie Sanders. But as I say and follow up tweets and messages, she said, look, I congratulate Joe Biden on behind Joe Biden.

[00:11:41]

But my role on this particular occasion was to back Bernie Sanders.

[00:11:46]

That was kind of the messy point of the week, really, wasn't it? But there was also some anti Trump Republicans coming forward against their president. And that was a huge aspect of the event. Absolutely.

[00:11:56]

And we saw several of them do it. Big names like. Colin Powell, the former secretary of state, Miles Taylor, a former senior Trump administration official, also endorsing Joe Biden, another Republican who came out sort of praising Joe Biden and indeed Joe Biden. His wife was the very senior Republican senator, Lindsey Graham, who was a good friend of Donald Trump. But after Joe Biden's speech, he said she had done a very good job representing herself.

[00:12:19]

She's an outstanding person who has led a consequential life.

[00:12:23]

And I think it's interesting, I didn't realize that Lindsey Graham and Joe Biden used to be really good friends until Donald Trump came to office and their relationship and their friendship kind of deteriorated after that. What it could be interesting to see if this is an indication of what's to come. And some anti Trump Republicans, as we've been calling them, giving them giving other Republicans permission to come forward and talk about Trump's re-election bid. Of course, a major aspect, too, was Donald Trump's ability to do the job as U.S. president and the threat some believe he is to democracy.

[00:13:00]

Brian, is it rare for a former president and a former first lady to launch such a scathing attack on a sitting president?

[00:13:10]

Donald Trump hasn't grown into the job because he can. And the consequences of that failure are severe. 170000 Americans dead, millions of jobs gone, while those at the top taken more than ever.

[00:13:25]

Our worst impulses unleashed our proud reputation around the world, badly diminished and our democratic institutions threatened like never before.

[00:13:35]

You know what Donald Trump will do with four more years? Blame, bully and belittle. And you know what? Joe Biden will build back better. Yeah, it's quite rare.

[00:13:45]

There's this unwritten rule where you don't attack presidents, don't attack presidents, previous presidents or their successors or their predecessors. Donald Trump, of course, to torn up that rule book long ago, attacking all of his predecessors. But certainly we hadn't seen that level of attack from Barack and Michelle Obama that we saw this week up to that. Had it not been of that scale, we had Barack Obama saying that Donald Trump was only capable of helping himself and his friends and that he treated the presidency like a reality show in order to get the attention that he craves the man himself.

[00:14:14]

Joe Biden also emerged from the basement and had his big moment. There was a lot riding on his speech. He has been constantly attacked from the Republican side about his ability to perform, but also worries from inside the party that he wouldn't be able to create that spark needed to inspire voters. But he defied all the odds and probably gave one of the best speeches of his career.

[00:14:41]

I think so. And it's a long career. It's a 50 year political career. And this was the biggest speech of that career. I think he did very, very well. As you mentioned, the Trump campaign has been telling us for months that he is some sort of bumbling mess who can barely string two words together. So expectations were low. I think he knocked it out of the park. I think he got angry when he was supposed to get angry.

[00:15:03]

He banged the table when he was supposed to bang the table. He was a pathetic and sad. When he was supposed to be sad, he showed emotion. He smiled. When he was supposed to smile, I thought the whole thing went off very, very well.

[00:15:14]

The theme, I suppose, was very much from darkness into light. And he accused Donald Trump of cloaking America in darkness without naming him right winger, which was interesting.

[00:15:25]

He just said the president, he never said Donald Trump's name.

[00:15:29]

And he spoke about how he had handled the coronavirus extremely badly. But if he was in charge, he would tackle the pandemic with a plan of action. On day one, he spoke about coming back to America's allies and stopping this practice of cozying up to dictators. And as I said, he spoke about the loss and the grief and the tragedy that he has suffered in his own life. And, of course, Jackie Fox, a Joe Biden speech cannot go by without a reference to an Irish poet and of course, his favorite, Seamus Heaney.

[00:15:58]

This is our moment to make hope and history rhyme with passion and purpose. Let us begin, you and I together, one nation under God, unite our love for America, united in our love for each other. For love is more powerful than hate. Hope is more powerful than fear, and light is more powerful and dark. This is our moment. This is our mission. History be able to say that the end of this chapter of American doctors began here tonight, he's very fond of that particular quote.

[00:16:32]

Actually, I've heard him address that particular quote on a number of occasions.

[00:16:35]

And once again, last night, we had reference to Seamus Heaney before we go and chat to one politician who spoke at the convention. Let's see what people think of all of this, because, Brian, you've been talking to a lot of people on the ground in Delaware this week where you are now. What do they make of the election? And Joe Biden.

[00:16:54]

So Wilmington, Delaware, Joe Biden's hometown, very well known. They are in general, very popular there.

[00:16:59]

I found it interesting, Jacki, a lot of the people. OK, first off, full disclosure here, the vast, vast majority of people I spoke to, Democrats, they will be voting for Joe Biden, were the hugely enthusiastic about him.

[00:17:10]

No, not all of them. A lot of people I spoke to sort of spoke about how well actually I was backing someone else in the primaries.

[00:17:15]

But now that we have Joe, he's fine. We'll back him. He'll be grand like, you know, Irish descriptions for the weather to find his grand grand self day.

[00:17:24]

He'll do we will do anything to get Donald Trump out of office. And Joe Biden is not perfect. But we want Donald Trump out. So we will be backing Joe Biden. I think that's a little bit of a problem for the Biden campaign. They talk about the enthusiasm gap. Donald Trump's supporters absolutely love Donald Trump and will fight to keep him in the office. We don't see that level of enthusiasm, I think, for Joe Biden supporters. But if enough people believe that the important thing here is to get Donald Trump out of office, then Joe Biden should be fine.

[00:17:53]

But certainly, I think if you're looking at a gap between those two candidates, enthusiasm would be one area.

[00:17:58]

I'm reminded of a Tip O'Neill. All politics is local. That might be a problem for Joe Biden. I also saw on Twitter last night that a group of Trump supporters weren't too far away from your good self, Brian.

[00:18:11]

That's right. So there was a group of Trump supporters came up to the outside of this convention center where Joe Biden was making his address. They were very loud.

[00:18:21]

They were very noisy. The chants included four more years, USA and Sleepy Joe say no to Sleepy Joe, this kind of thing. Lots of posters, lots of banners protesting against Joe Biden and promoting Donald Trump. A lot of these people were local to the Wilmington, Delaware area. A lot of them very keen to tell me that, you know, just because we're from Wilmington, Delaware, doesn't mean we support Joe Biden. We don't like the guy.

[00:18:47]

We want Donald Trump. And they all have their various reasons. One of the organizers of the event was a man by the name of some chick. He is the chairman of Delaware Young Republicans. And I spoke to him yesterday.

[00:18:58]

You have come out here today with your Donald Trump signs, but it's the big Joe Biden address. Why are you here today? That's right. We are here for Delaware rallies against Joe Biden. This is the home state of Joe Biden. And we want the rest of the country to know that we here in Delaware who know Joe Biden best know that he is not the president this country needs. Why? What's wrong with him? Joe Biden represents more than four decades of being a career politician.

[00:19:22]

It's corruption, collusion, cover ups here in our state. He has ruined it. It really is. He's part of the machine that has a very shady lock on things. It's just time for Joe to go in retirement. You know, we're sick of this guy being a parasite on our state. What is Donald Trump any better yet? Donald Trump is great. He represents what this country is all about, which is freedom. People able to make their own choices, the government not getting involved in your life.

[00:19:48]

America is the last bastion of real freedom.

[00:19:52]

And that's why it is so important that we keep somebody like Donald Trump in office and keep people like Joe Biden as far away from the levers of power as possible. But look at what's going on right now. Coronavirus out of control, economy tanking, racial unrest. How can you say he's done a good job? He's done a fantastic job. Racial unrest. That is the that is the agenda of the far left and the radicals, the communist movement, antifa and the really, really extreme part of the Democratic Party.

[00:20:22]

They want to divide this country. They don't want to unite it. The more they can divide it, the easier it is for them to create unrest and to create a condition where communism can come into this country.

[00:20:34]

Some chick there, Brian, a Republican you spoke to when you were out and about in Delaware, I think a lot of minority groups would have a lot to say about his comments there. So as we mentioned earlier, this was a virtual convention with people delivering their video addresses remotely. And right now we're going to speak to one of those people who spoke at the Democratic National Convention. You deserve health care, you can afford a job that pays you fairly, you deserve child care and paid sick leave while you work.

[00:21:17]

And when you pay into Social Security and Medicare, you deserve to know it will be there when you retire.

[00:21:24]

We're joined on the line now by Congressman Brendan Boyle of Philadelphia, who was one of the speakers during this Democratic convention that we've just witnessed over the last few days. Congressman Paul, thanks very much for joining us. I suppose, first off, what was it like to be asked to get involved in the Democratic convention? And you had a very specific role. You were deemed as one of the rising stars within the Democratic Party.

[00:21:45]

Well, it's a real honor to be a one of the speakers as part of the keynote address, which is always one of the major speeches that at any convention. So I was just completely honored and really taken by surprise. I know that Vice President Biden himself ended up in selecting the the younger members that he wanted as part of the keynote address. So obviously, that makes it even more so of an honor.

[00:22:13]

The whole thing looked quite slick on air. It was very well produced. What was it like to be actually involved behind the scenes? Like, was it all very organized with they telling you, OK, you can speak from this time to this time? You have to do X, you have to do Y, maybe just talk us through the process, how this new virtual convention worked.

[00:22:27]

Right. The part that I was a part of was very well organized. And so I had a glimpse into that, but it was rather siloed. So, for example, I didn't know what else was going on the rest of that night or what another person's piece would look like. A few of us who are speakers and our friends were kind of trading texts about our own different experiences. A friend of mine who serves in the United States Senate and was speaking on a different night.

[00:22:56]

We were sharing our filming experiences with with one another just to see what else was going on. But for most of it, I did not know what it would look like until I sat down in front of my television and watched it, including, you know, since I was one of the speakers. But my speech and several others were melded together to have one unified keynote address, something completely unique to this convention, something that you can obviously only do if you're doing it virtually.

[00:23:27]

I did not know what the final product would look like. None of the other speakers did as well. So it was great to be a part of. But I really only had a window into a small aspect of it. And so I ended up being a viewer just like everyone else. And from the people I've talked to, that was the case with all of the other speakers as well. So as I said before, it's just a completely unique experience, unlike any other previous convention.

[00:23:58]

Congressman, does part of you wish that you had that stage and the crowd to feed off then for your speech?

[00:24:07]

You know, I thought about this both before and after, and I see advantages and disadvantages to both approaches. Or I should say there are positive aspects.

[00:24:17]

Either way you go, if it's in person, like the traditional convention, you know, in front of an arena of twenty, twenty five thousand people, you have the energy, you have the cheering crowd, but you lose a bit of the intimacy.

[00:24:32]

And so the idea that I was able to speak to the American people sitting literally at my kitchen table and speak directly to the camera, provided a sort of intimacy that speaking in front of twenty thousand people just doesn't provide. So overall, I have to say, I think there are advantages to both. But if I had to choose one, I think I choose the latter. I think that part of what made especially Joe Biden's speech last night so effective was that intimacy, the the feel that he was speaking directly to the constituent, directly to the voter and in a big arena that might have been lost.

[00:25:14]

What's the talk now, though, between yourself and other colleagues? Do you think then that this is something that could happen again in four years or maybe even a hybrid of what happened this week and what happened before?

[00:25:27]

I would say through the week, the folks that I've been talking and emailing and texting with have all been positive about how the convention turned out. So moving forward, I tend to think that it'll be some sort of a hybrid of that, of course, will again have in-person gatherings. But that now that we've seen that this style works to, how can we have the traditional convention in person, but better integrate video, better integrate being virtual. I'll give you one example, I hope, moving forward the roll call of the states when the presidential nominee is officially nominated.

[00:26:03]

I hope it's done exactly the way it was done this week and not in the previous format, which would drag out. Over an hour and a half and intended to be quite boring, it was much more interesting going to the 50 states and D.C. and having people from there, being able to, you know, give the vote tallies of their respective states. So I think there are aspects like that that will be the new normal moving forward.

[00:26:31]

Congressman Brendan Boyle, as people will tell from your name, your Irish American, and in fact, you are quite the Irish American campaigner. You raise Irish American issues a lot. You speak about Ireland a lot in Congress. You speak about Brexit, you speak about Northern Ireland. Joe Biden is also an Irish American. He speaks a lot about his Irish roots. He speaks a lot about Ireland. What sort of a president would Joe Biden be from an Irish perspective, do you think?

[00:26:54]

Well, I think it would be a great advantage. I mean, literally a picture that is on my mantle at home is a picture of Joe Biden, the former teacher. My father and me and all four of us are gathered at the Irish ambassador's residence last St. Patrick's Day evening, where we were just gathered socially for for a couple hours to have a president of the United States who loves Ireland, is familiar with the issues, would be an enormous advantage.

[00:27:25]

And one tangible example of this is obviously, given my position in Congress and of the Ways and Means Committee, I have been fighting to attempt to protect the Good Friday Agreement from any collateral damage as part of Brexit to have someone in the White House who would be an ally. And on my side in that would be an enormous benefit if I could just return to the convention.

[00:27:50]

A major theme of the convention was unity that the Democratic Party can appeal to progressives and even some Republicans. But rolling out so many Republicans from John Kasich, Colin Powell, is this a little bit too much? What I mean is that if Joe Biden becomes president, thanks to a coalition full of moderates and former Republicans, will progressives not ask that these be the voters he listens to on the biggest policy questions facing the country rather than themselves?

[00:28:21]

Yeah, I've seen a little bit of that criticism online. And I have to say it's not a concern that they hold. You know, the reality is, especially in a two party system, any time a party is going to forge a majority there, by necessity, it has to be a certain ideological diversity within that coalition. I look at that convention and I look at the Biden campaign and I would say it represents the most progressive platform in our party's history.

[00:28:52]

It represents center left views and center views. I think that that is a winning coalition and a majority coalition in the United States. I also think if you look at the numerous Republicans who have come out for Joe Biden, I think now more than 70 former Republican national security officials, a staggering number, have come out and endorsed Biden over Donald Trump. I take them at their word that they are doing so because they frankly see a second Trump term.

[00:29:21]

The way I do is simply dangerous. And so there's a certain aspect of this that doesn't have to do with issues that is non ideological. It's that in my view, we have a deeply unstable person sitting behind the resolute desk in the Oval Office. And so this is a break the glass pull the emergency lever election, and I welcome their support.

[00:29:44]

There was a lot riding on Joe Biden's speech and whether he would be able to pull it off or not. Was there a sigh of relief as how powerful it was?

[00:29:56]

I know that there might have been some people who were worried. Frankly, I was not one of them. I endorsed Joe Biden literally on his first day as a declared candidate about a year and four months ago. I've always just been struck by how completely underrated Joe Biden's skills are. In retrospect, I would say was probably an advantage that he has been so underrated and the fact that for the last several months, the Trump campaign has constantly hammered home this message that, you know, Joe Biden can barely string two sentences together.

[00:30:35]

They ended up doing Joe Biden a tremendous favor, because then when you see him last night, see what an effective speaker is. You can see that he's a kind and empathetic person, but also has to know how to do the job. I did not sigh of relief because, frankly, I was not worried, I mean, that is the Joe Biden I know and I'm just glad that so many millions of Americans were able to see that perhaps for the first time last night now that it's all over convention wise.

[00:31:03]

What's your assessment on what the rest of the campaign might look like? Do you think the whole thing will be virtual up to now? Joe Biden's been very virtual. He's been in the basement. He's been doing some goals. He's been doing online campaigning. Is that something we're going to see or do you think are going to see a return to the traditional election campaign for the last few weeks in the run up to the election?

[00:31:20]

If there's one thing we've learned over the last five, six months, throughout this year of covid is making any prediction about what two weeks from now will look like. Ends up, in retrospect, looking laughable. Last night, as I was headed down here to Washington, my wife and I were attempting to figure out what our child care would look like because the schools in where we live in Philadelphia are switching from what was supposed to be a hybrid model to now strictly online, because the numbers number of covid cases are not where they thought they would be just a few weeks ago.

[00:31:57]

So the lesson of twenty twenty is any sort of prediction or any sort of plan is entirely dependent upon covid. Maybe we'll be in a better situation come late September and you could see some small gatherings. We might very well be in a worse situation or it might be the case. Given the United States is such a big and diverse country, we might be in a better situation and my state of Pennsylvania and a far worse one in other southern states.

[00:32:25]

So at this point, no one really knows.

[00:32:34]

So that's the end of the DNC and enrols the Republican convention and apparently Donald Trump has been watching the DNC very, very closely. He is a TV man, after all, and nobody really knows what to expect.

[00:32:49]

Do they know the Republican convention is still a work in progress? We get little bits of information every few days or this person is going to be speaking or it's going to be happening in this location. It still seems to be finalized. It hasn't been finalized. Now we know some facts. It is taking place in Charlotte, North Carolina will be heading down there and we'll be speaking to you from there next week and telling you how we got on. But it will largely be virtual like the Democratic convention.

[00:33:13]

But as you said, Donald Trump's been watching the Democratic convention all week and he has been critical of the fact that a lot of the speeches were prerecorded. And he said he wants more live speeches and he wants more audience interaction and more audience participation. But how is that going to be possible in the era of covid-19? So I think we're in a situation where he desperately wants an old style convention, campaign rally style convention, but that's not possible.

[00:33:36]

So they're still working out the finer details. They're finalizing the speakers. They're finalizing the locations. We do know that Donald Trump himself plans to deliver his big acceptance speech on Thursday night from the White House. And his organizers have also applied for permission for a big fireworks display in Washington, D.C. following that address.

[00:33:52]

It's going to be big. We wait and see with some popcorn and we'll talk to you, Brian, at the end of next week to see how you got on in North Carolina. But in the meantime, especially to our new listeners of states of mind, don't forget we have an email and you can contact us on State of Mind at RTG as we get closer to Election Day. If you have any questions or anything you would like to hear us cover, please let us know on State of Mind at RTG dot IHI.

[00:34:22]

So you're an unpredictable week ahead, Brian. Can't wait to see what we're going to talk about this time next week.

[00:34:27]

Yeah, it's going to be very interesting to see how the Republicans respond to what I think most people will regard as a pretty successful virtual Democratic convention in very, very changed times.

[00:34:38]

Chattier than Brian getI next week.

[00:34:40]

Jacki, bye.