Transcribe your podcast
[00:00:00]

You're listening to Comedy Central now. Hey, everybody, welcome to The Daily Social Distancing Show. I'm Trevor Noah. It's Tuesday, August 11th. And here's a tip for anyone who's heading back to the office for the first time since March. Remember to smell the milk in the kitchen before pouring it in your coffee, because after five months, it might be spoiled. And then again, it might also kill Corona. So maybe just go for it anyway.

[00:00:28]

On tonight's episode, Kanye West is out of time. Roy Wood Junior makes a citizen's arrest and Donald Trump wants to make sure you never get a birthday card from me ever again. So let's do this, people.

[00:00:40]

Welcome to the daily social distancing show from Trevor's couch in New York City to your couch somewhere in the world. This is the Daily Social Decency Show with criminal lawyers. Let's kick it off with the big news of the day, the vice presidency, it's America's assistant manager and today Joe Biden announced who he's picked to be his VP.

[00:01:08]

We're coming on the air with breaking news. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden has made his choice. NBC News has confirmed that Biden has picked California Senator Kamala Harris to be his running mate, the first woman of color in history to be chosen for such a position. So the Democratic ticket is Biden Harris. That's right, people. Joe Biden has officially picked Kamala Harris to be his running mate. Say what you want about Joe, but the man went black and he's not going back.

[00:01:37]

And I got to say, I'm impressed that Biden picked Kamala even after she destroyed him at that debate. In fact, part of me thinks he only picked her so that she can just never dust his ass in public again. This isn't a VP pick. It's an insurance policy. And I'm really interested to see what the Trump campaign's line of attack is going to be on COMILLA because they're going to have a tough time. Everything she's done in her career appeals to Trump's base.

[00:02:01]

Crafty spent your whole career locking up criminals and filling up California's jails. She's even friends with cops. All done. That actually sounds pretty cool.

[00:02:14]

Mike, is it too late to change you? But jokes aside, congratulations to Kamala Harris. She is now the first black woman on a major party ticket, which is a great moment for her and for America. Moving on from our next possible vice president to the next possible president of the United States, Kanye West. Since announcing his candidacy, the hip hop superstar and broke looking billionaire has been scrambling to get on the ballot in as many states as possible.

[00:02:43]

And unfortunately for him, it's not going smoothly.

[00:02:46]

West's legal team is fighting to be included in the November presidential election. Well, here's the problem, though. The Wisconsin election campaign alleges the nomination paperwork was filed 14 seconds late. What's his response? Was that 15 seconds after 5:00 on the deadline, night is not later than five. They argue the deadline includes any time before 5:00 or one.

[00:03:08]

Surprise, surprise, the guy who made late registration couldn't get his paperwork in on time and guess.

[00:03:16]

Thank you.

[00:03:18]

Although if I'm being perfectly honest, this is a tough philosophical question. I mean, think about it. If there's a 5:00 o'clock deadline to hand in your signatures, are you late?

[00:03:28]

If you hand them in at five o'clock and 14 seconds, like, is it five o'clock until 5:00 or one or is it five or one immediately when five o'clock hits and you only call it five or one when the one is complete? I mean, this is the kind of question I don't know the answer to. What I do know is there's one person I don't want to debate the meaning of time with, and that's Kanye West.

[00:03:48]

Time was invented by the devil to destroy God, but it's also a product of God. Ha. And this decision by Wisconsin is the kind of thing that when it happens to someone else, you're like, hey, man, rules are rules. They said before 5:00 you didn't do before 5:00. But when it happens to you like this is bullshit, what is this?

[00:04:08]

Communist China? But I don't know, man. Kanye West, with this little lawsuit, he might have just won my vote because I want a government that believes that deadlines are ish.

[00:04:19]

You know, Tax Day, April 15th ish.

[00:04:23]

Yeah. You get them to us when you get them to us. Expired license and was good a month ago. Go on, get out of here. Moving on to covid-19, the virus that's turn shaking hands into an extreme sports.

[00:04:36]

The good news is the first vaccine has been approved for use in the general population. Yeah, the bad news is it was approved by Vladimir Putin.

[00:04:46]

Breaking overnight, a surprising claim from Russian President Vladimir Putin that a vaccine has been developed in his country and has already been given to people, including his own daughter, in the global race for a coronavirus vaccine.

[00:05:00]

Russia said today it's already one, even though it hasn't completed phase three trials. That's not slowing Russia down, which today registered and approved for use its vaccine while continuing to conduct human trials.

[00:05:15]

Scientists, including from the show, are urging caution, saying only extensive and prolonged testing can determine if a vaccine is effective and safe.

[00:05:27]

OK, this is a pretty shady, to say the least, because you see vaccines are like ordering food. You want it quickly, not too quickly. I mean, yes, I'm hungry, but if my delivery comes in under ten minutes, was that my delivery or something that was supposed to go out yesterday? Also, let's be honest, has anything good ever come from a Russian injection? I mean, the best case scenario is you win an Olympic medal that gets taken back two years later.

[00:05:52]

And I know Putin wants people to trust him. I think he gave the vaccine to his daughter, but there's no one suspicious that he can give the vaccine to himself because we don't know his relationship with his daughter. Like if Trump gave the vaccine to his daughter. We'd know it's real. But if he gave it to Eric and we all know what's up. So, look, the truth is that a safely tested vaccine is still probably months away. But in the meantime, here's something that might just hold you over candy.

[00:06:20]

Trick or treating in doubt because of the pandemic, candy manufacturers are protecting themselves from potential losses for their biggest season. Hershey has partnered with retailers to set up Halloween merchandise earlier in the summer, in some cases four weeks earlier. In addition to the longer season, Hershey's is focusing more on family sized packs and fewer treats in Halloween specific packaging.

[00:06:45]

This is classic America. The candy companies are like, OK, because of Corona, we've got to be prepared. Let's plan this thing out early and let's make sure everybody gets access to candy.

[00:06:55]

Whereas the election people are like, oh, no, no, I'm feeling lucky. Let's see what happens in the day.

[00:07:00]

And as for Halloween, I thought this whole year was Halloween. Every day I've been wearing a mask and going through an entire bag of fun size Twix. What are we supposed to do in October? But I will say I really do feel bad for candy makers, especially in Palumbo's, because let's be honest, if sales are down, they're going to be the first ones let go. And finding a job right now as an open Lupa, that's not easy to do.

[00:07:26]

Do do you think he was for those things?

[00:07:31]

Meanwhile, Halloween isn't the only awesome tradition in jeopardy. You see, college football season is right around the corner and the battle over whether to play is getting more brutal than, well.

[00:07:43]

College football sacked the leaders of college football, holding emergency talks on whether to cancel the season.

[00:07:50]

The Big Ten conference announcing late today it will postpone all full sports.

[00:07:54]

Joining the Mountain West and Mid-American conferences, Vice President Mike Pence saying in part, America needs college football. It's important for student athletes, schools and our nation.

[00:08:03]

President Trump took to social media saying student athletes have been working too hard for their season to be canceled.

[00:08:10]

These football players are very young, strong people. And physically, I mean, they're physically in extraordinary shape. So they're not going to have a problem. You're not going to see people, you know, could there be could it happen? But I doubt it. You're not going to see people dying. They get better very quickly if they get it at all. So I think I think football is making a tragic mistake.

[00:08:32]

Donald Trump truly has the strangest priorities of all time. One hundred and sixty thousand Americans are dead, it is what it is, college football might get postponed for a year. What a tragedy. If those kids don't get to bang each other's heads, you might never see another Donald Trump.

[00:08:52]

But I will tell you this. If college football is being canceled, then, you know, coronaviruses serious, because I've traveled through this country and people in America will do anything for college football.

[00:09:05]

If you told Tennessee fans that their football stadium was going to be moved to the surface of the sun, they'd be like, well, then I'll find a seat on the shady side because this year's going to be the rose year.

[00:09:17]

But you know what, guys?

[00:09:18]

Instead of forcing college football, maybe now is the time for the college sports to have their moments. Don't like how about fencing? It's perfect for Corona. You wear a mask and the whole point is to keep someone away.

[00:09:31]

Seems like it's time to shine. OK, we're going to take a quick break, but when we come back, we'll tell you why the president is slowing down your mail. Don't go away.

[00:09:41]

When it's time to go to bed, are racing thoughts keeping you awake? If so, it's time for you to try EBR sleep when it's time for bed. Stress can impact your ability to relax. EBR Sleep created the cool drift sleep system to help you counteract life's stresses. The mind's normal way of dealing with stress is to be more vigilant. But that's the opposite of what you need for a restful night of sleep. The Ebb Cool Drift sleep system provides a cooling, calming sensation to the forehead designed to counteract the way the mind and body reacts to stressful situations.

[00:10:16]

Ebb, called Drift, is a compact and gentle wearable solution that helps reduce racing thoughts to allow people who are suffering from sleeplessness to drift comfortably into a deeper, more restorative sleep. Imagine what you can take on the morning after a restful night of restorative sleep. Whether you're seeking a solution to a long term battle with sleeplessness or looking for small improvements to operate at your peak, it's time to try the ebb. Cool Drift Sleep system. Producers at The Daily Show love the ebb drift sleep system because it makes falling asleep and staying asleep much easier and because it's a much more natural solution than taking sleep.

[00:10:55]

AIDS sleep is critical and it believes a solution should be natural with no harsh next day side effects. And just for Daily Show listeners, you can save 25 dollars off your order by going to try Web.com Treva and using promo code Treva at checkout. That's 25 dollars off your order and you can try it risk free for sixty nights that's tr why eb dotcom Trevor try eb dotcom Trevor and use promo code Trevor to save 25 dollars today. The Daily Show is brought to you by American Home Shield, do you have an American Home Shield plan?

[00:11:38]

If you're a homeowner, you should. Why? Because when a coverage system or appliance breaks down, your budget won't. If the heat goes out, the refrigerator dies or you have plumbing issues. It can be a mess that few of us have the skills, time or extra cash on hand to take on. That's where American Home Shield comes in. They cover the costs to take care of it. If American Home Shield can't repair an item, they'll replace it.

[00:12:04]

They've paid more in home warranty claims than any other company, adding up to more than two billion dollars in the past five years. American Home Shield offers coverage for electronics, too, like tablets, flat screen TVs and more, and local help. No matter where you live. With a nationwide network of seventeen hundred licensed professional contractors, they can find a pro in your area, and even your satisfaction is covered with their 30 day workmanship guarantee. If you have an issue with the repaired part or component, American Home Shield will send a contractor back out for free.

[00:12:37]

Go to a dotcom Trevor today to save fifty dollars and start protecting your home and budget from inevitable breakdowns. A Dotcom Trevor that's a X.com Treva for fifty dollars off any plan. American Home Shield. Be sure with the shield limitations and exclusions apply. See plan for details. Welcome back to the daily social distancing show with the presidential election right around the corner. The big question is no longer will Donald Trump try to cheat. It's now become how will Donald Trump try to cheat?

[00:13:16]

And with more Americans than ever expected to vote by mail due to coronavirus, it looks like he's zeroing in on his plan.

[00:13:24]

President Trump is stepping up his effort to discredit mail voting as vulnerable to fraud, ramping up attacks on Twitter and on television.

[00:13:32]

I think mailing voting is is going to rig the election. I really do.

[00:13:36]

They want to steal an election. That's all this is all about. They want to steal the election. There is no way you can go through a mail in vote without massive cheating.

[00:13:48]

Democrats are pushing to expand mail and voting and change existing voting laws to make it easier for people to cast ballots at home because of the coronavirus. The president wants his political allies to fight back against that, and they have now pledged 20 million dollars for that effort for real.

[00:14:07]

Only Donald Trump is weird enough to have beef with the male every day, he's less and less like a president and more like a neighbor in a sitcom.

[00:14:16]

God damn you, Meryl, man. I mean, this guy is spending 20 million dollars to sue mail in voting. Normally, when Trump spends that much money suing you, it's because you've seen him naked. I know what you saw last. I mean, you can't tell anybody. You can't tell them about this thing that I get. So even though the president and almost everyone in his administration votes by mail, clearly he thinks that letting everybody else do it would be bad for his re-election.

[00:14:50]

And because lawsuits alone won't stop mail in voting, the other part of Trump's plan is to just stop the mail.

[00:14:56]

Tonight, a backlog of undelivered mail is piling up in post offices around the country, and workers are blaming the new postmaster general. A top Republican campaign donor who has given more than one point one million dollars to the Trump Victory Fund. Lewis Dejoy force cost cutting measures leading to undelivered mail piling up in post offices across the country. And CBS News confirmed this internal Postal Service directive that outlines an operational pivot, saying extra troops to deliver mail are no longer authorized and that we may see mail left behind or mail in the work room floor or docks, which is not typical.

[00:15:33]

The service insists it's not intending to slow down any delivery or risk any election mail. But the stakes are high for the USPS to follow through on its promise of On-Time Delivery. 32 states currently will not count ballots that arrive after Election Day, even if postmarked earlier.

[00:15:51]

Wow. Even if you mail your ballot in on time. Thirty two states won't count them if the post office gets them in late. And that doesn't sound like an election. That sounds like what happened to me in high school. Yeah, I gave my friend a love letter to post to my crush, but then he decided to skip third period instead. So she never got my letter. So she went to prom with another guy and then they ended up getting married and having a kid.

[00:16:21]

So that should have been my kid. And that's what I told the cops. They made me give the kid back anyways. And that's why you got to defund the police.

[00:16:29]

So, look, if Trump and his cronies are trying to sabotage the post office, there's only one solution, and I hate to say it, folks, but we have to let Bed, Bath and Beyond run mail in voting because no matter how much I try to stop them, I keep getting those coupons in the mail. It's ridiculous.

[00:16:48]

I don't need all of this. We need all this milk. I don't need to know that there's thirty five percent of shower curtains. Oh, shit.

[00:17:01]

It was expired anyway, so Trump has been on a crusade against mail in ballots, and then he installed a close political ally who just happened to start slowing down the mail, which means that come November, a lot of votes that are supposed to make it by Election Day might not. It also means that in the meantime, all the other mail is getting delayed and it's having a huge effect on people's lives.

[00:17:25]

In some parts of the country, customers are waiting weeks for their mail. These neighbors in Chicago's Dunning neighborhood want consistent U.S. Postal Service mail delivery. Susan Carter says when mail is delivered, it comes late and sometimes it's not theirs. I just think the system fell apart and I don't think they care about us. All that stuff that's important to you that nobody else should get, maybe going to somebody else's house.

[00:17:50]

In Baltimore, people waited two hours in hopes of getting their mail that never showed up.

[00:17:56]

Many are getting bills and paychecks on time, putting a strain on their homes and businesses to cover everything. The only thing I didn't survive was the mail.

[00:18:04]

As a veteran myself, I get medication through the mail. I rely on them and not to have it when I need it. That's a travesty to a veteran.

[00:18:16]

Yeah, you see, a lot of people think that mail is just a waste of paper credit cause that they're not going to sign up for an ads for shit that they're not going to buy. But for many, many people, that's how they get their medicine. It's how they communicate with family members in prison. And for many areas of the country, especially rural areas, the post office is the only way they can receive mail. So the mail might mean nothing to you, but it means everything to some people.

[00:18:42]

Think of it like a woolston volleyball. It might not mean anything to you, but when Tom Hanks got trapped on that island, it was his everything.

[00:18:51]

Do you think he was that volleyball? No.

[00:18:55]

So, look, it's becoming clear as day that unless Trump changes his mind on the post office, just like every other Trump business, it could be doomed. OK, when we come back, Roy Wood Junior conducts a citizen's arrest.

[00:19:08]

You don't want to miss it. Welcome back to the Daily Social Distancing Show, it has now been almost six months since Ahmad Aubury was murdered while jogging in his own neighborhood. And in a summer where police brutality has been put front and center. Aubrey's murder was particularly troubling because the men who killed him were police officers but used one hundred and fifty year old law to justify their crime. Warriewood Union has more in his new segment. How is this still a law?

[00:19:37]

In the criminal justice system, there are laws and then there are laws that are dumb and make no sense, these are their stories.

[00:19:47]

We're now learning more about why Glynn County police never arrested either of the two men involved in the shooting death of twenty five year old Amont Aubury, a district attorney, Barnhill states in this letter that both men are protected under Georgia's citizen's arrest law, citizen's arrest, just some bullshit, people say on TV, but in real life, a citizen's arrest, no Barney Fife shit.

[00:20:09]

You are a individual that's 20 some odd years of age and individuals are running after you, blocking you in with cars. That's called honey. That's the wild, wild west that we talked about. This is Georgia State Representative Carl Gilliard, someone who is just as outraged about this as I am.

[00:20:25]

The citizen's arrest law gives individual citizens the right to arrest someone up to 48 hours until law enforcement would arrive.

[00:20:35]

So not only can you citizen's arrest somebody, you can just keep them for two days like misere.

[00:20:43]

People are using laws as a justification for murder, as a justification for lynching. You have a higher form of racism. They're not wearing hoods anymore to wear shirts and ties. Yes, I like to play a halo. I think you're correct. How is this still a law?

[00:20:59]

Well, no one's challenged, this law was conceived in 1863. You know, it's just it's outdated. Hmm.

[00:21:09]

What possibly could have been happening in Georgia in 1863? I ask, knowing I won't like the answer.

[00:21:15]

This particular law was written during the Civil War and was a way of preventing enslaved Africans who were trying to escape to the union lines. It empowered any white person to arrest any black person.

[00:21:29]

So on a scale of Betty White to David Duke, how racist is this citizen's arrest law?

[00:21:36]

You tell me when to stop that. That has to do that.

[00:21:51]

One of the big things about Georgia is the man in charge of writing the formal laws.

[00:21:57]

Thomas Cobb is an avid racist wave of racist.

[00:22:01]

You wrote books justifying racism, basically arguing that African-Americans were better off than slaves and could never really function as free people. Oh, shit, that is it. OK, continue Cobb himself.

[00:22:15]

He dies in 1862, but the system of law he had established for Georgia lives on.

[00:22:22]

And that becomes the the basis of protection for racists like the Ku Klux Klan after the Civil War because they could lynch any African-American and claim it was a citizen's arrest.

[00:22:37]

How is this still a law? We still have a racist society.

[00:22:43]

We haven't gotten rid of so many elements of racism in the United States.

[00:22:47]

Well, that settles it. I talk to the experts. I studied the finest legal texts and I can confirm this law must be changed, but I have no idea how to do that.

[00:22:58]

Yo, how is this still a law? All these injustices are happening and nobody's doing anything to stop it. I am what you are. That's why I authored House Bill Toivo three.

[00:23:08]

You're proposing a law that gets rid of the law. That's a terrible law. There's some people that are trying to move forward.

[00:23:17]

Oh, cool.

[00:23:18]

As it turns out, one of the things filling up Karl's cat calendar is a bill to repeal the current citizen's arrest law.

[00:23:25]

And he's getting ready to drop it like it's don't say it.

[00:23:27]

Can't we all drop it like it's not Telecity, it's a movement. Now, the old Jim Crow has had a bowel movement and we're in a whole new movement.

[00:23:39]

So repealing the citizen's arrest law is a laxative against the Jim Crow constipation that's been holding up the progress of the black man. And what we need to do with that, let's say, is a stand your ground Mexican and then we need to take a no choke hold that indeed we need to take a voting registration suppression laxative and get all of that moved out and into the toilet of justice. Not only time will tell if citizen's arrest gets flushed into the sewage system of history, but we're definitely a step closer to getting rid of this law for the entire country.

[00:24:14]

No, this is for Georgeanne. Oh, shit. How many states have a citizen's arrest at all of them, with the exception of maybe two.

[00:24:25]

So we got work to do. We've got work to do. Oh, how is this yellow law yet?

[00:24:40]

Thank you so much, Roy. When we come back, I'll be talking to a star of the hit show. This is us, Sterling K. Brown.

[00:24:47]

Stay tuned. Welcome back to the Daily Social Distancing Show. Earlier today, I spoke with the award winning actor, Sterling K. Brown. We talked about a new initiative he's working on called One Million Truths, which is a platform to capture and convey the scale of racism in American life. Check it out. Sterling K. Brown, welcome to The Daily Social Distancing Show.

[00:25:10]

Thank you for having me. Honored to be here. You say it's an honor, but I've been trying to get you on the show for years and you haven't found the time or the means to make it to the show. And then. Now, now when I can't be in the same space as you now you come on the show because, you know, I wanted to take a selfie with you so I could show all my people back home that I know you.

[00:25:28]

And now I'm going to be like, oh, yeah, I sort of know him.

[00:25:31]

But we did that selfie. We did that selfie at a premium event on time.

[00:25:35]

And you told us you hold the camera as if you're taking this up with this and then rotation and you get picked up.

[00:25:44]

You're a very busy man, not just working, but also being nominated for the work that you do. So let me start by congratulating you. Congratulations on two Emmy nominations. One for this is us, one for the marvelous Mrs. Masel. If I if I'm correct in the sense that I believe that you are the first actor to be nominated in both of those major categories in the same year, drama and comedy range, that's what that is.

[00:26:09]

So maybe Ed Asner before me was nominated for Mary Tyler Moore Show and for Roots. But at the time, Route's was considered just a drama, but not a limited series. So Brad's second and I'm good with that.

[00:26:23]

I know you are the father of two young kids and you've been in the house during coronavirus. Did they give you any recognition for your nominations or were they just looking for like, what is daddy going to do today? Cook today, make today, teach us today? What, like, do they even care?

[00:26:38]

My youngest has no clue. It's not important to him at all whatsoever. He's almost my oldest, knows exactly what's going on. And so I told him that I got nominated. Is that you got nominated again? I good for you. That's awesome. And I know that you have now is like, oh, you understand. He'll mock me openly to my face. Own Sterling Brown. I got Emmys, I have Golden Globes and I have nwc two words.

[00:27:03]

I'm so cool, whatever. And then he goes and beats my ass and that's how he reckons with me.

[00:27:09]

I feel like you are missing out on an opportunity as a father. If you don't wait for him to graduate a grade and then he comes and tells you he's like, Dad, I passed, I got an A and then you go like, oh, look at me.

[00:27:22]

I've got I can't wait to get out of turnabout is fair play.

[00:27:30]

You're one of the people who gets welcomed into millions and millions of people's households every single week. People know you and they love you. And so anything you do will get a spotlight on upon it. Everyone's going to shine that spotlight where they go. Sterling K. Brown is doing something you part of a project right now called One Million Truitt's, which is a really, really interesting project.

[00:27:52]

And I wanted you to share it with the audience. What is one million truths all about?

[00:27:55]

Appreciate it, man. It's basically a platform, an initiative for black folks in America to share their experiences with racism. And I think it's a centralized way for black folks to see other people's stories and for our allies who are interested to see that the experiences of that their friends have told them about are not a one off, that it's not just something that happened like in an isolated incident, that these isolated incidents are happening over and over again all over the country.

[00:28:25]

And maybe by having one place where people can go and see like, oh, life for black people in this country is not the same as it is for me. Right. And then there's a development of empathy and hopefully a wave of support that we can ride right now to make some real change to systemic racism in this country.

[00:28:45]

One thing I've always enjoyed about the show, this is us is it's it's an interesting look at how much people can love each other and know each other, but still not know fully about each other, you know, and you play a character where you're part of a family where even though you share so many things, there's still something that separates you and that is the color of your skin. And I wonder if, like, is that is this certain storytelling that you try and get across in the show that that helps people empathize with somebody who has a different skin color without making them feel like they are being blamed as opposed to the system being being being highlighted?

[00:29:24]

I would hope so. I think Randall Pearson, just like his brother and sister and mother and father as a human being first and foremost. And I think so much of the power of media is that people learn through exposure, whether it's through travel, whether it's to books, whether it's through the representation that they see on screen. And I show the demographic of our show as best, but it's about 80 percent white. So there's opportunities that I have to make conversations with people who may not have those conversations with someone that looks like me, and by virtue of them seeing me in their home 18 times a week, I can say, like do random.

[00:30:02]

He's just like me. He loves his kids. He loves his wife. Like, I understand part of his struggle, even if I don't understand the totality of it. So hopefully the next time they see me or anybody who looks like me, they can lean in rather than step.

[00:30:16]

I'd love to know about your personal story a little bit because I. I learned that you discovered that I think your your fifth great paternal grandparents were from Africa.

[00:30:28]

And it's always interesting when people discover where their family came from, especially when you live in America and the records aren't there for you to easily peruse.

[00:30:35]

But does that change anything in your world and in your mind when you start to track how and where your family came to you, to the United States? Does it change a little bit of the story you tell yourself of you or your family or even the country you in there?

[00:30:49]

Is this really sort of profound experience that you have as a young black man in a predominantly white institution of learning? I went to St. Louis Country Day in St. Louis, Missouri, and I would be one reason or one of a few reasons in the sun, fast white experience.

[00:31:07]

And every time February comes around and you're talking about Black History Month and you talk about the institution of slavery, everybody looks at you and they're like, well, we're past that. Like, why are we still talking about this? This is ancient history, as if this country is old enough to have ancient history. Right. And so you feel this sort of defensiveness to be like, how do you show that? Like, the repercussions of what transpired in the past is still reverberating in the present.

[00:31:36]

And then you see documentation of your ancestors listed as as property, you know, listed as there was a bank. The guy wanted to the excuse me, I'm being very ineloquent in this particular moment, the slave owner who owned my quadruple Great-Grandparents listed them as collateral because he wanted to extend his plantation and he needed them to list them for a bank loan. And so you see them listed as property and you recognize it like it's not that long ago.

[00:32:10]

You recognize that while other people could list your family as property so that they could expand their wealth, their reach. We had nothing. It's a completely different starting point. And it's sort of just validated for me this level of defensiveness that I've always had to prove something I don't have to prove, like I can see it. And it's so little. Black folks across the world have documentation of the oppression that has transpired to them as individuals and as a people.

[00:32:41]

It really just I don't know, it made it real. I knew it was real before, but I thought I had the ocular proof.

[00:32:49]

Mm hmm. Yeah.

[00:32:52]

I wonder, is this is this one of the reasons not this particular story. But but but but the history of America, your history in America and the story that America tells is this one of the reasons that you you named your your production company the way you did it?

[00:33:06]

Is it why you chose to focus on certain stories and how to tell them using the platform of Hollywood?

[00:33:12]

So it's interesting. The the name of my production company is Indian Motos, and it's named after the neighborhood that I grew up in in St. Louis, Missouri. And it's a predominantly African-American neighborhood that went through. It was Jewish. And then black folks moved in and the Jews didn't leave, but their kids grew up and went elsewhere. So I had old Mrs. Weberman living next door to me, my substitute teacher. It's Bayti school. And she was just playing with all these little black kids who loved her as much as anybody.

[00:33:42]

And so so just the testimony of where I come from and who I wish to represent, because as evidenced by the fact that we get to celebrate Kamala Harris being the vice president, the vice presidential nominee, along with Joe Biden. I'm very excited. My wife, by the way, I should say, is almost as excited as I am. But if you're familiar with Greek organizations in the United States, my wife is a delta and Kamala Harris is in a little bit of shape.

[00:34:14]

But still, it's still a reason to celebrate. Right. Seeing yourself on screen validates your life. And so I want to tell stories where people of color or marginalized groups are front and center and not necessarily the sidekick or the goofy friend or whatnot. But this story is about them, because when you see yourself, you know that your story is as important as anybody else's.

[00:34:38]

Well, I'll tell you this. If somebody is watching the Emmys this year, they will see you twice nominated and hopefully twice winning. Sterling K. Brown, thank you so much for joining me on the show. Thanks a lot. I appreciate you, brother.

[00:34:52]

Thank you so much, Sterling.

[00:34:53]

Well, that's our show for tonight. But before we go, I just wanted to let you know that there are a lot of groups out there right now who are working to protect and advance voting rights for the elections in November. One of them is the Alliance for Youth Organizing, which is a national network of local youth led organizations mobilizing people to vote. The Daily Show with Criminal Lawyers edition once The Daily Show weeknights at 11:00, 10:00 Central on Comedy Central and the Comedy Central Watch full episodes and videos at The Daily Show Dotcom.

[00:35:23]

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to The Daily Show on YouTube for exclusive content and more. This has been a Comedy Central podcast now.