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[00:00:00]

Democrats understand coronavirus Republicans do not understand coronavirus Democrats, whether at the state level, the local level now, I guess at the national level, have handled the epidemic well. Republicans are responsible for every single death. That's what we've been told. We were told this by Joe Biden. Even when he was on the campaign trail. He told us that Donald Trump is responsible for every single covid death. So presumably, if a Democrat had been in charge from the beginning of the epidemic, nobody would have died.

[00:00:33]

Right? Well, there's just one problem with that, which is if you look at a Republican state like Florida did not really shut down ever is basically wide open right now. And you look at a Democrat state like California completely shut down some of the most onerous restrictions in the whole country. When you look at how the virus is affecting both of those states, looks pretty much the same. Those states are more or less indistinguishable. Joe Biden's coronavirus adviser can't quite explain it.

[00:01:03]

Contrast states like Florida and California, California basically in lockdown and their numbers aren't that different from Florida.

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Well, good morning, Stephanie. Look, there's so much of this virus that we think we understand that we think we can predict this just beyond a little bit beyond our explanation. But we do know is that the more careful people are, the more they mask and social distance and the quicker we vaccinate, the quicker it goes away and the less it spreads.

[00:01:32]

Hold on. We don't know that. Actually, the whole premise of the question is that we don't know that if we did know that, then Florida would be in a much worse place right now on the virus than California is, because Florida basically not doing anything to social distance and mandate masks everywhere, California forcing all that sort of stuff there in the same place. So we don't know it. He says he admits, yeah, we don't really know anything about this virus.

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But the one thing we do know is you got to do all the stuff the Democrats won. We know that works. No, we don't. But then he gives the more honest answer.

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But we have got to get better visibility into variance. We don't know what role they play in large events, et cetera. But, you know, this is as we all learn by this time, this is a virus that continues to surprise us. It's very hard to predict. And, you know, all around the country, we've got to continue to do a better job. But I think I think we are. But we're not done yet.

[00:02:26]

Yes, the virus does surprise us. Yes. There's a lot of stuff that you don't know, but that is not stopping you. Genius expert, you, Biden, White House, you liberal establishment from exploiting the virus to foist these crazy policies on all of us. They don't know very much about the virus, but they know enough to exploit the virus to cram a whole new political system down our throats. And Michael knows this, the Michael Muleshoe.

[00:03:01]

Welcome back to the show. My favorite comment yesterday from Cammo Man responding to Bill Gates's promise that we've got to stop eating real meat, start eating fake meat, says the fake meat, my area sells so poorly that when they rotate the stock, they put the old stock in the freezer before it expires. This is true. It's not just a joke. This does happen. I remember vividly at the beginning of the epidemic when everyone was hoarding food because they didn't know how serious the virus was, how long we were going to be like that.

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You go, you wouldn't find any food in the grocery stores. Looked like images out of nineteen seventies Soviet Union. And so the meat section be totally clear, the bread would be totally cleared, empty shelves, except for the fake vegan meat, except for the the impossible sausage or whatever that may be full and say, you know, I would rather starve to death than eat this crappy fake meat. But that's what they want to force down our throats, quite literally.

[00:03:58]

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[00:04:23]

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[00:04:47]

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[00:05:04]

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Noles the decisions that are being made. With regard to the coronavirus are political decisions, we've said this ad nauseum, we don't need to get into this much more. They are not scientific decisions. I guess there's a sort of scientific petina to them, but they are political decisions by definition. Any decision that a government worker makes, it's going to affect the way that we behave, the way we live our lives. That's going to affect our rights.

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By definition, that is political. And what it represents is a new hierarchy. Certain people are given special privileges based on the ruling ideology, and we will get into that ideology a lot on this show. Certain people are given special privileges, certain people are disadvantaged. There is a system of worth and value. And the virus shows you this clearly because you have to prioritize what people get treatment. You have to prioritize what people are going to get the vaccine.

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There's a finite supply. There's a there's a limited roll out. And so certain people are going to get it. Certain people are not. Now, it would make sense to me. Since we're supposed to have equal justice under the law for all American citizens, it would make sense to me to roll out the vaccine based on people's risk levels. I am, I think, a healthy 30 year old guy. There is absolutely no reason for me to be prioritized on this vaccine.

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Frankly, even if there were an unlimited supply, I'm not sure that I would get it, not because I think it's going to install five G. I don't know what the conspiracy theories are. It's going to install five G in my blood or something. And that's not the reason I wouldn't get the vaccine. Actually, my cell service is a little bit weak, so if I could become a human hotspot, I might consider it. That's not why.

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It's just because I don't need the vaccine, so I'm not going to get it. And I'm sorry if that offends the liberal regime that insists that we all need to get the vaccine, but I just don't really think I need it, so I'm not in any rush to get it. However, if you are, I don't know. Seventy five. Eighty five. Ninety five probably. You should consider getting the vaccine and you should be prioritized in in the list as the government decides how this rollout is going to work.

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California's taken a different approach. The California vaccine guidelines are prioritizing various groups, including. I kid you, not marijuana workers. Marijuana workers, people in the pot industry are being prioritized over teachers to name just one group, and this is to promote. Equity, what is equity, I don't know, sure doesn't seem like equality can be equality, right, if some groups are going to get it, some groups or not, that's not equality. They're calling it equity, according to the, quote, updated covid-19 vaccine allocation guidelines from the California Department of Health, medical marijuana workers are prioritized ahead of people in education, ahead of people in working in child care services, as well as many people over the age of sixty five.

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So by any any regime of rolling out the vaccine is going to give some people access over others, seems to me reasonable and equitable and just to give it to the older people, because the older people actually are at some risk from the virus. No, they're not doing that in California. They have different political priorities. It's up to the state of California to do that. We all have a right and self-government to shape the way we want to live.

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And we need to get beyond just the procedural questions of do we have this right? How do we govern ourselves to the substantive stuff? What regime do we want to live in? Who do we want to prioritize here? Do we want to prioritize the old people or do we want to prioritize the potheads? There is a new caste system being pushed and it's not usually being pushed on the basis of how much choom you like to smoke, how many, how much of that since spinach you like to light up in your bowl.

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Really, what is being pushed as the the determinant here is race and sex. Jen Psaki, our favorite current White House press secretary, was just asked what the Biden administration thought about reparations, reparations for what you might ask, why reparations for slavery. Jen Psaki does not admit to it entirely, but she also doesn't shoot it down.

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Well, he's supported a study of reparations, which I believe is what's being discussed and studying the continuing impacts of slavery, which is being discussed in this hearing on H.R. 40. I believe it is. And he continues to demonstrate his commitment to take comprehensive action to address the systemic racism that persists today. Obviously, that is having that study is a part of that. But he has signed an executive order on his first day, which would begin to deliver on his commitment to having an across government approach to addressing racial inequality and making sure equity is a part of his entire policy agenda.

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But he certainly would support a study of reparations. We understand understands that we don't need a study to take action right now and systemic racism. So he wants to take actions within his own government in the meantime.

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OK, I can't take any more of the jargon in the gobbledygook because it's sounds like a big, long nonanswer. And part of the job of the press secretary is to evade questions. But I don't think that we can those of us who are reasonable people who don't believe that a system of reparations is going to help anything in the country and actually will hurt a lot of a lot of political questions in our country. I don't think we can just rest easy and say, oh, don't worry, Biden, he's a moderate.

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He's not going to do anything radical. Everything that Joe Biden has done since entering the White House has thrown away this assumption that he's going to govern as a moderate. He has governed in probably the most radical way he possibly can. Listen to what she says. She says, well, he can do things for racial equity now, and he's doing that. And he could take action. But he's got there's going to be a study and a commission and they're going to study the commission and review reparations.

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Hold on.

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Why do we need a study or a commission or a review about reparations? We know the facts of the case. We had legal slavery in the country for a long time, ending in eighteen sixty five, kind of strange, actually. The first officially declared slave in the American tradition of slavery, meaning not someone who was given slavery as a punishment for a crime, for instance, but someone who was arbitrarily declared a slave for life, was a man named John Cayzer, black man in the United States.

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And the slave owner was also a black man. His name was Anthony Johnson. It's very strange. Obviously, slavery became this much more racialized system later on. But the first sort of officially declared slave owner in a way that we would recognize in the United States was a black Angolan guy. Pretty weird. And it raises all these questions for reparations. For instance, if reparations are going to be given on the basis of race due to recent immigrants or the children of recent immigrants.

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Get reparations, say a guy from Nigeria comes to America in nineteen eighty two. Do he and his and his descendants get reparations? Well, if systemic racism exists, probably they should get reparations. Right, because, yeah, sure, their ancestors were not slaves, but they live in the system where black people are constantly mistreated. So I guess they should get reparations. Should the descendants of Anthony Johnson, the first officially declared slave owner in America, should they get reparations?

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I don't know. I mean, there they would be black or at least part black. Would they have to pay reparations to the descendants of John Kacer or I don't know. So that's murky, but what's what is a study going to do? We know the basic facts. It was slavery. It happened however long ago, 50 some odd years ago. What are we going to do now? This is a subject for political debate, not for some ridiculous bureaucratic team to study and then come to an answer, because I think the answer is probably predetermined by the progressive left.

[00:13:48]

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[00:15:02]

Noles tend to get ten percent off. The left uses this tactic all the time and Biden is being a little on the nose about it. But I think a lot of people don't recognize it when they see it. When the left has a radical proposal that they want to implement, but they know the people aren't ready for it yet, they will gradually get people accustomed to it by commissioning a study or a commission to review the facts and then come to the predetermined conclusion.

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New York Times had a headline shows this perfectly. So here's a tweet from the Times. A Chicago commission listed five statues of Abraham Lincoln among dozens of monuments that it said should be reviewed by the public as part of a project started in the wake of last year's protests against racism and police violence. OK, it sounds very bureaucratic, but very clinical language. What they're saying is we need. To review Abraham Lincoln. What is there to review, we we know Abraham Lincoln is one of the most famous men in our nation's history, a great man, long revered.

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There's no review that can be done that is going to shed new light on Abraham Lincoln. This is a political debate. Do you want to take down the Lincoln statues or not? Do you want a country that admires its forbearer Abraham Lincoln or a country that reviles Abraham Lincoln and all of the other forebears? Because, by the way, if you're going to get rid of Abraham Lincoln, the man who freed the slaves. On the basis of racism or something, then you're going to get rid of everyone and you're going to realize finally you're going to get it through your thick head, squishy Republicans, squishy moderates, you're going to get it through your thick heads that they're not just going after Robert E.

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Lee on the left. They're not just going after, I don't know, Thomas Jefferson. They're not just going after Andrew Jackson. They're going after Washington. They're going after Lincoln. They're going after everybody, everyone who can be identified with the traditional American regime. They've got to go because the left doesn't like that regime. So they want to knock down that history and rebuild a new history. They know that right now the American people are not ready for that.

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They wouldn't accept that if the commission just came out and voted and said, we're ditching Lincoln. So they review and they study and they slow walk it until it just seems inevitable. Now, this, I think, is offensive. I think the calls for reparations are offensive. I think the new racial caste system that the left is pushing is offensive not just to white people and Asian people who, for instance, are disadvantaged through the legal discrimination of affirmative action.

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But they're also offensive to black people and Hispanic people who are advantaged by affirmative action. What affirmative action says is that black people and Hispanic people can't cut it. So they've got to be given a special break and they've got to be given bonus points on their tests because that's the only way they can get into the good schools. Right? That's that's what it says. That's the only that's the only effective affirmative action, so it's all I could possibly say.

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Don't you find that a little bit offensive? I think it's pretty offensive. I know what Clarence Thomas said, it was very offensive. He wrote about this in a memo where he said, even though I had a degree from Yale Law School, people assumed I only got in because of affirmative action and I felt the sting of racial bigotry. A lot of people talk about that. Joe Biden doesn't help things when he says genuinely offensive things on the basis of race.

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The other part portion is a lot of people don't know how to register. Not everybody in the community, in the Hispanic and the African-American community, particularly in rural areas that are distant and or inner city districts, know how to use know how to get online to determine how to get in line for that covid vaccination at at the Walgreens or at the particular store.

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You know, man, come on, man. Black people and Hispanic people like my good buddy Corn Pop. They can't use the Internet. They don't know man.

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They don't know how to use the Internet is the latest in a long series of racially offensive comments that Joe Biden has made, for instance, when he said that poor kids are just as smart as white kids, conflating, but I guess poor and black or synonymous and rich and white or synonymous for for Joe Biden, I guess, for kind of the politically correct regime. That's true as well. That wasn't a Joe Biden who said of Barack Obama that he was the first clean and articulate black man.

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And that's a that's a fairy tale, man. Come on, man. Right. Says a lot of things that are pretty offensive and people knock him for it, but it doesn't matter. He's not going to pay any political price. And I think conservatives have been making the point that I just made a moment ago for a long time. They say we all should unite against affirmative action because it's so offensive and it's racist. And you you Democrats, you care about racism, but you're pushing this policy.

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No, come on. Be persuaded. By my logic, they don't care. They don't care. It's fine to acknowledge this. I think we should have all the facts before us. But the left doesn't care because they know that racial discrimination is a very powerful tool, actually. There's a good book by Mike Anzar from the Heritage Foundation, things called The Plot to Change America, which is about how the black civil rights movement is a unique phenomenon among racial issues in America.

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Because we had. American slavery, we had Jim Crow. It was, broadly speaking, racial, Anthony Johnson and John Casoria side these unique cases aside, broadly racial. And so we've got to grapple with that. And that's why the civil rights movement developed the way it did. And then. Left wingers from the 1960s and 70s, funded largely by left wing foundations like the Ford Foundation, realized this was a very effective way to amass political power.

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So they started to create new identity groups on the basis of race, one being Hispanic and Latino. The idea that all Hispanic people are sort of just one thing, that people in Spain and Mexico and Guatemala and Argentina and Peru and Brazil, that they're all just one thing is pretty weird and it's pretty new. That idea is only about 50 years old and a minority of Latino people have identified primarily in this way, according to various surveys. But it was effective.

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They then did it to Asian people. They tried to do it during the Obama administration, to Middle Eastern people, Middle Eastern, North Africa. They tried to create that category called Menagh. I didn't really catch on. And it shows you how farcical the whole thing is, because historically in the United States, people from the Middle East and North Africa have been categorized as white. Linda Sarsour, who was one of the activists behind the Menagh category A famously said that the reason she wears a hijab is because without a hijab, she's just another boring white lady in New York City.

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It shows you if you're trying to create a new identity group, if you're categorized as a white person, then you try to recategorize yourself as an allegedly aggrieved minority group. It probably shows you that there's not so much privilege there in being identified as a white person that actually there's social currency in being able to claim victimhood. There is a lot of power there. And so I don't think arguments against this sort of thing on the basis of good, good faith arguments are really going to work.

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Joy Reid was one of the many left wingers yesterday who went after Rush Limbaugh and called him a racist and a bigot and all that sort of stuff, which is complete B.S.. Just ask both Nordley. I just ask Rush's longtime producer, who does not have a lot of white privilege, let's say the claim that Rush Limbaugh, some racial bigots, completely preposterous, but the left is going to throw it because they call all of us racial bigots. And racism to them is just a synonym for the word bad.

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So they use it without any any basis. They may accuse David Webb, for instance, of having white privilege, as one caller did on his radio show, without realizing, of course, that David Webb is black. So, Joy, Reid was throwing this argument at them. But listen, listen to what she considers to be the worst thing that Rush Limbaugh did.

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Rush ultimately got his way. Rush Limbaugh reached millions of listeners via his golden microphone with his shows airing in small stations out in rural America that even Fox News couldn't reach, hardening rural white listeners and weaponized a white male grievance.

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That's the phrase I want you to focus in on. Joy. Reid is very upset that Rush Limbaugh allegedly hardened white male grievance. I dispute the premise that she's pushing here. I don't think that Rush Limbaugh was a racist. I don't think he attempted to inflame racial animosities or anything like that. But I want to take the hypothetical here. What if he had. I don't like the idea of racial grievance politics, I don't want to speak to white racial grievance, OK?

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The left loves racial grievance politics, they're pushing racial grievance politics right now, they're pushing reparations for slavery. One hundred and fifty six years after the abolition of slavery.

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It seems to me that the left primarily these days is post primarily, above all, their other political agenda, they are pushing racial grievance, politics and joy. Reid is very upset when. There is even the prospect of white grievance politics. What do you think is going to happen if you convince everyone that race is the most important thing? Well, then people are going to believe you, aren't they? They're going to accept that kind of grievance. Politics is trying to attack Russia here.

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She's projecting she's projecting what the left is doing. They're absolutely shocked at the. Hypothetical natural consequences to the kind of dirty politics they've been pushing for a very long time. You know, one of my absolute favorite organizations that has been with me for a very long time has been serving customers online for a very long time. Is rock, auto, rock, auto, dot com so much easier than walking in to the auto parts store and answering questions that you're not going to know the answer to?

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Then, just as importantly. Right, Noles in there. How did you hear about this box so that they know that we sent you. The left has foisted on us a new system, a new understanding of ourselves politically, whereby a grievance is currency and racial and sexual identity is paramount beyond national identity, beyond religious identity, beyond even local identity, race and sex. That's what they're pushing. And if you transgress the new system, you will get in a lot of trouble.

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A former Massachusetts high school football coach is now suing the Dedham Public School District. Why? Because he was fired. Why was he fired? Because he disagreed privately with the radical political and racial curriculum that was being taught in schools. His two daughters were being taught a curriculum premised on Black Lives Matter. Black Lives Matter is in a way, it's a racial organization, but it's also a very radical ideological organization. It's an explicitly Marxist movement. According to the movement's founders, it seeks, among other things, according to its website, to dismantle the Western prescribed nuclear family.

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Radical stuff. This this high school coach and parent said, you know, I don't I don't really think this belongs in the social studies classroom. You can learn about it maybe as an historical phenomenon, but you can't you can't push this sort of thing because then you're not teaching students history, really. You're not teaching them even philosophy. You're pushing this very narrow kind of ideological perspective on students and you're delegitimizing all of the others. And by the way, if you're pushing Marxism, then you are undercutting our traditional American philosophy.

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If you are pushing this highly racialized vision of politics, you are undercutting the racialized politics that we have embraced in America. Certainly in recent years, you could only get one or the other. He said. I don't think you should be doing this. He got fired for it. Now he's suing. I think he should sue. I think we have to expose the system for what it is and have the wherewithal to hold the system up to its rhetoric.

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Let me bring that down to earth, because that sounds very abstract. In the United Kingdom, so not in the United States, a white civil servant is suing for racial and sexual discrimination. This is in London. A white male civil servant is filing a lawsuit. Matthew Parr has a salary of one hundred thirty four thousand pounds per year. It's a very high salary, right? We're talking this guy is making a lot of money. He also has a seventy nine hundred pound living allowance.

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Wow, man, this guy, how do I get that civil service job? But he's going to sue because he learned that a black woman when Williams was hired and make significantly more money, an extra fifty thousand pounds a year, it seems. She had accepted a lower offer, but then she was just automatically given a higher offer because the civil service was afraid that maybe she was being paid less than someone else. So ordinarily, we here in the United States that people who are not white and not men make much less money for doing the same job.

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And this just isn't true. But when you factor in education and experience all these sorts of things, hours worked, those pay gaps disappear. In the civil service, though, you actually can sort of compare these things. And so shocking because it upends the usual ideology. We're being fed the white guys being being paid less than the black lady. He absolutely should sue for this. I do not think that we ought to have a politics that is rooted primarily around race or primarily around sex.

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But that's what the left is pushing. And if the left if that is the dominant regime, then that dread the awful worst sort of individual you could possibly imagine. The straight white male. Now, with gender ideology, I guess you'd have to say that straight white male who knows that he's a male has to push back against injustice. The system broadly is rife with injustice and of course, we need to push back against that injustice, I think a lot of people would not want to do this.

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Well, first of all, this guy here is making a ton of money, so he's really got nothing to complain about. And I think a lot of white guys don't want to be accused of being racist, so they'd say, oh, just let it go, OK, this other people are being paid more because of their race and sex. OK, that's and or whatever. It's no big deal, but it is a big deal. It's wrong for everybody.

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You know, we often hear from the left, racism is a problem for everybody, injustice for anybody is an injustice for everybody. Well, in a way that's true. If you've got an unjust system, it is your obligation to push back against that sort of thing. Because it is. It is it is terrible for everybody. Now, Joe Biden is fanning those flames and he's done this for a lot of his career. Remember when he said that Mitt Romney wanted to put black people back in chains back in twenty twelve?

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Bad stuff. He's he's always harping on that sort of thing. But it's unclear how much longer Joe Biden is going to be around. The White House is already pushing out that Kamala Harris is taking on more and more responsibility. Comilla tweeted the other day. She said, Today I spoke with President Emmanuel Macron of France. We discussed covid-19 climate change, supporting democracy at home and around the world and regional challenges. The president I look forward to working with President Macron to build a better future for our two countries.

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She's taking other other phone calls with other dignitaries. This is unusual for a vice president, but it's because obviously Joe Biden is not all there. We've all heard the bizarre slips that we've all seen that he just is not the guy he was even five or 10 years ago. So as I often say, I'm an I'm a conservative optimist in the sense that a conservative pessimist says things can't get any worse. I think things can get a lot worse.

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And they're obviously grooming Kamala Harris for this. An update, though, on mortality from top politicians. Bob Dole. Bob Dole, ninety seven years old, was recently diagnosed with stage four lung cancer. Very sad. I really like Bob Dole. And it's really sad that he was diagnosed that way. And he put out a statement. He said, my first treatment will begin on Monday. You've got to give this guy credit. You've got to give Bob Dole credit.

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I've always admired him, not even because I felt he was the most conservative, rock ribbed Republican. But this guy, he's a fighter man. This guy is a war hero. He's a total fighter. Ninety seven year old saying I'm I'm going to undergo treatment starting on Monday. More power to him. He's absolutely in our prayers. Bob Dole is the first presidential candidate I ever voted for. You might say, Michael, you were six years old when Bob Dole ran in 96.

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That's true. I paid some attention. As much as any six year old can pay attention to the news, I was paying attention to it all. I knew about the race. Bob Dole was a war hero and Bill Clinton was a draft dodger. And I liked Dole and I didn't like Clinton. My mother was going to vote for Bill Clinton. She voted for Republicans a lot. But, you know, some of our politics were kind of interesting.

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And I begged her to vote for Dole. She let me go into the voting booth with her, as I did actually a lot when I was a child. And she let me pull the lever for Bob Dole. I'm sure the FBI is going to investigate me now for voter fraud. No, wait. Voter fraud doesn't exist. So never mind. In any case, well wishes to Bob Dole. Love, love that. That guy is a fighter.

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He also he's the only living GOP nominee who showed up to the convention in twenty sixteen. You know, the Bushes boycotted twenty sixteen, which I felt was very ugly, very unseemly. I understand why they did it, but it was too bad. I always gave Bob Dole a lot of credit, but he actually kind of struck it out with Trump. So in any case, a best wishes to to Bob Dole. We'll see, though. We've got a lot of change coming on.

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There's an old generation of politicians that is passing on either, you know, into the into the next life or passing on out of political power, of political importance. And and what is coming up? I can't say I'm too hopeful for it. If Joe Biden is the old Comilla is the new. That's not great. If a system that had a lot of problems, but more or less at least spoke to equality before the law, justice if that's passing out.

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And we've got this new politically correct radical system of racial and sexual grievance coming up, that is not great at all. We've got to stand up against that sort of thing. I don't care how uncomfortable it is. I don't care how unpopular it makes you. I don't care how vulnerable it makes you. Even you've got to stand up for justice. And we have got to get to the mailbag before we do that, head on over to daily Wired.com subscribe.

[00:35:22]

There's a lot of fun stuff going on, a daily wire right now. We're about to launch a new venture with Candace Owens. That's going to be pretty cool. We're about to launch a movie with Gina Carano. Disney tried to cancel. Well, too bad now we're going to work with her and we're not going to allow you to cancel her. You can. Twenty five percent off daily where you go to Deleware. That comes subscribe use promo code.

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Gina, Virginia, Grono, Jeanna. We'll be right back with the mailbag. Welcome back, my favorite time of the week, the mailbag. Let's get right into it. First question from Julie. Hey, Michael, I was wondering if if I am a person who identifies as a fetus, does that give my mom the right to kill me? I legally it does. It does. It hasn't been tried in court yet, but legally, it does give your mother that right.

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I'm sure some parents of teenagers might might be thinking about that right now. But, of course, I mean, you actually raise a great point here, which is I think that. Identity is objective. Meaning I think that we are individuals, we have individual souls, our souls have a relation to our bodies, we have a purpose here, which is to know God and enjoy him forever. God knows us, endows us with rational faculties to perceive the objective world.

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It can be objectively stated that I am a man. You can see some evidence of this, my Adam's apple and other things below the desk, which we don't get to right now. It's a family show, so I think that's all true. Now, the left. Takes this sort of subjective view to identity, where you see this in the racial question, right? You say, well, I identify I might be biracial, but I identify with this race and not the other race.

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They take it obviously with gender. I am the sex, but I identify as this sex. Therefore I am that sex. But they take it to human life as well, which is you'll see everyone in the liberal media will celebrate the royal baby. When if a celebrity has a miscarriage, there was a very famous celebrity, a miscarriage this year, I forget her name and it was a big cause in the liberal media. And they said I was sorry they were.

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But of course, if the celebrity did not recognize the baby as being a baby, then it wouldn't have been a problem at all. Right, if if you do not recognize the the fetus as a human being, then it's fine. It's actually it's celebrated. It's a good thing to kill them. So you can take this crazy identity politics to its extreme and say, well, all right, well, I identify as a fetus. I identify as whatever.

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I identify as a leftist years. No, I identify as my neighbor's dog was barking outside of my home studio as I'm snowed in here in Nashville. Next question from Morio. Hey, Michael. I'm twenty nine years old. I'm in California. I'm a conservative and Catholic. I have a question about relationships and marriage. I've been with my girlfriend now for about a year and a half. She is great. She's everything a guy like me could possibly want, which makes me very confused because for about a year now, I can't shake the feeling that she's not the one.

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My question is, should I cast my doubts aside and ask her to marry me or should I listen to my gut and pursue the one? Is this fair to my girlfriend or future wife or is this one of those? Think about your own happiness situations. Thanks, Mario.

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I'm going to give you. Very difficult advice, it's not going to be very clear advice, but I know not going to say do this, don't do this, but I hope this will clarify your situation. It's advice that I rarely hear conservatives give. Sometimes I hear people say, no, you'll know the one pursue the one that's purely romantic notion. Sometimes I hear conservatives say it doesn't really matter who you marry. Marriage is an objective thing. Just do these certain things should be fine, share values, whatever.

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I married the one. Not everyone gets to marry the one I get to marry. The one I sometimes I kid you not. I will wake up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat because I have a nightmare about marrying some ex-girlfriend or something and have terrible. My life would be if I had not married sweet little Alisa who is one hundred percent the one we've known each other since we were ten years old and I basically always knew it, though I was a little confused perhaps that sometimes.

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As far as one is, when one is a teenager. I speak from experience, it is absolutely great to marry the one. That said, marriage is a real institution, that is a process, and you hear happily married people say when they're 50 years down the road, they say, I love my wife more today than I did 50 years ago. The reason for that is you grow together or you grow apart. And when you grow in this union, you become one flesh and that actually does something.

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So marriage does transform you. And to people who may be, you know, obviously arranged marriage was the norm in most societies throughout history. People who maybe they didn't know each other very well, they didn't have this kind of romantic love. Through marriage, if you do marriage right, we'll grow together because it's a real thing. It's objective. It's a sacrament. You grow together and they will end up loving each other. I think it was Benjamin Disraeli, his wife, the famous British prime minister.

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She said, I know that he married me for my money, but I think if he had to do it again, he would marry me for love. That's a that's a profound statement. So you have to ascertain a few things. Is this just you? Is this you being sentimental or is this maybe you have some vision of someone else and maybe that's an infatuation that's not really love or you don't want to you don't want to let that infatuation or some sort of flighty idea carry you away and ruin a good relationship.

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But are you, on the other hand, maybe thinking too clinically about this? Oh, yeah, she checks the boxes, but there's no spark there. I will tell you, as a passionate person of Latin descent from the aisles of Sicily, it is good to have a little bit of passion. It is really I mean, often when people write in asking me for relationship advice, should I date this girl? Should I not? I say, why don't she hot?

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I don't know. Do you find her attractive? I mean, come on, man, you can't be too clinical about all of this. You shouldn't only pursue that, you should also look at vertue shared values, shared perspective on the world some way that you can grow together. I need you to balance those two things. The passionate part is important, you shouldn't discount that and the serious don't let flights of fancy carry you away so that you run off with some lunatic just because it's really passionate.

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For a brief moment, both of those are very important. Both of those are going to matter in your marriage and you're going to have to. As with all things in this finite world, keep both of those in your mind, not not allow your passions to run away with you, but not be so cold and clinical that you have a cold marriage. I need more details to give you a yes or no on your girlfriend or wife, but I hope that helps.

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Clarified from Caitlyn. Hey, Michael, my wife recently told me I'm going to be a dad. Oh, great. Congratulations. I'm ecstatic about having children. This is my first also scared out of my mind. How did you react when you found out you were going to be a dad? What do you know now that you wish you had known back then? I reacted very happily, but I wasn't surprised because as some of you know, I'm Catholic and I've mentioned that every so often I'm practicing.

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I'm going to keep on practicing until I get it right. And yet I didn't have a child until two years into my marriage. The reason for that is it just didn't happen right away. So we're kind of working on it. I won't be too graphic about it, you know, because trying is not the worst thing in the world, I think, for a young married couple. But when it finally did happen, I thought, oh, good, finally.

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Goodness gracious, that's great. And, you know, I was a little worried about just about the health of the baby health of my wife. Luckily, thank God, both turned out great. What did I what do I wish I knew? I wish I knew how hard it is on the mother. I'm not saying this to suck up to the mothers in the room. I just didn't realize I didn't realize that especially if you're nursing, that the woman basically just never gets to sleep.

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And I'm not the most modern man in the world, so I'm not exactly sitting up. I will biologically be very difficult for me to nurse the poor little baby. He probably wouldn't like it very much, but also I'm aware a little bit more, sort of. I try to get more sleep and then go into work. And, you know, my wife is a little more nurturing than me taking care of the baby a little bit more than me.

[00:44:00]

So I didn't realize how hard it is on the woman. I mean, it is really, really hard. And then if you have a C-section or something like that, it's really, really, really tough on the woman. So I would have tried to prepare a little bit more, maybe get some family to visit, maybe get a nanny or something. I would have I would have planned that out for the first few weeks at least. But that's wonderful.

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Congratulations. I hope you have as much fun as I'm having from Anthony. Dear Michael, do you think it would be useful to start talking about liberals and leftists in the media and other institutions is having implicit biases against conservatives and conservative viewpoints? Thanks for all you do, though. The problem with that is that the biases are not implicit. They're explicit telling you of them all of the time. And when someone is doing something explicitly, it probably doesn't help to call it to their attention.

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But also, I just the idea of implicit biases and that that should guide our politics is just very silly and stupid. And it's a left wing idea. And I don't think we really benefit from playing into the left's language. I think the way the left transforms culture is through language primarily. I just wrote a book about this that kind of studies over the past hundred years how the left has transformed language and how conservatives have completely failed to fix it and maybe what we can do to fix it.

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The book is called Speechless, by the way, controlling words, controlling minds. You can preorder it right now wherever books are sold. So I just don't think we should play into their language. I think we should use our own language, use good, sturdy, traditional language, which is more evocative, and force them to use our language for that matter. Right now, they force us to use their language and we often give in. I don't think we should do that.

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And I don't think we should pretend that language doesn't matter. I think we should actually impel them to use our more correct language from Victor. Hey, Michael, I remember you saying a while back and something that helps you have such a great memory was memorizing poems. What poems do you recommend I try to memorize? Oh, where to begin? Shakespeare is probably at the top of the list because when you memorize Shakespeare one, you'll have instant recall to some of the greatest lines in the English language.

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But it's also one it'll help you pick up girls at cocktail parties, you know, sort of impressive. And it's he's easy to memorize because he's such a great writer. He writes in this beautiful meter with all this beautiful language. So recommend Shakespeare if you want something a little more modern. Robert Frost is great to memorize. I have memorized a zillion Robert Frost poems. King James Bible similar to Shakespeare. Great thing to memorize, will make you more fluent in our language.

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And I don't just mean in the various words and sentence structures. I mean just just Shakespeare in the King James Bible have crafted so much of the way that we speak and think that if you start out memorizing those guys, you will be just better acquainted with our whole culture. From Hey, dear Mr. Knowles, there's a great number of conservative commentators who are saying Donald Trump running in twenty twenty four is a terrible idea and we should not nominate him.

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I was wondering what you think of the rebirth of the Never Trump movement, and do you think Trump should run for a second term in twenty twenty four? Yeah, never. Trump never died.

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There's always been that kind of strain that. Never trump an embodied in the right. They were the Rockefeller Republicans back back in the Goldwater and Reagan days, they were the Gerald Ford Republicans later on. Also during the Reagan days, the Reagan era kind of spanned a while when you consider his first entrance to national politics. They were the Bush Republicans. They were the Romney Republicans. They so they've always been around and they were going to be around into the future.

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I still like Donald Trump a great deal. I am still a great supporter of Donald Trump's. I think that Donald Trump was an excellent president, at least relative to the other presidents in my lifetime. So I'm not opposed to the idea of him running in twenty, twenty four. I don't know that he'll do it. It would be very difficult for him to do. The deck would be so stacked against him. I don't know that he would want to do it.

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He he already got to do it. He already got to be president and he'll also be older then I think maybe Republicans might want a younger candidate that said he's a he's a great force in politics. I'm not I'm not opposed to the idea of him running now. I guess the the question that moves forward is who else do we have? I think that's going to affect some of his calculations. So we'll we'll just have to find out from John.

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Hello. Thank you for taking my question. How do you know I was going to take your question, John? I think conservatives should go all in promoting the economic system distributed, which was promoted by Hilaire Belloc and Chesterton. Do you agree that distributers should be part of the path forward for conservatives distributers and for those who don't know? Is this kind of third option? It was popular in the early 20th century. It was a third option to capitalism and socialism and distributed some kind of rejects, both of those.

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And it's based in part on Catholic social teaching, in the teaching of the of the thirteenth him. I think it's terrific. And Leave the thirteenth is one of the popes who spoke out most aggressively against socialism. So I like the idea of it. And I love Hilaire Belloc and Chesterton, both of whom were great conservatives. I don't know very much about the system of distributed ism. And something tells me it's a little too clever by half. I've never really seen it put into practice and never became all that popular.

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So I'll look into it and keep an open mind. I'll broaden your question, though. Should conservatives take seriously criticisms of capitalism? Yes. For too long we have not taken that seriously. Capitalism the word. It's a word popularized by Marxists. I don't think we should accept that framing and a part of distributive Zim's claim here is that what we understand today to be capitalism is a system that came out of the Enlightenment. It's a modern kind of liberal system.

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Actually, these words get a little convoluted when we're when we're talking about about terms that have changed over time. But, yes, should conservatives be wary of capitalism, recognize that capitalism such as it is, is a can be a wonderful instrument to human flourishing, but it's not an end unto itself to be made an idol of ABBA so freaking loudly. I know that'll ruffle a lot of feathers from the kind of conservative establishment of the last twenty years.

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But one hundred percent. We should take that seriously. That's our show. Have a good weekend. I'm Michael knows this. The Michael NULL show see Monday.

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If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe, and if you want to help spread the word, please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe. We're available on Apple podcast Spotify and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Also, be sure to check out the other daily WYO podcasts, including the Ben Shapiro Show, The Underclassman Show and The Matt Walsh Show. The Michael Noles Show is produced by Ben Davies, executive producer Jeremy Borut.

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[00:51:21]

Hey everybody. This is Andrew Clavon, host of the Andrew Clavon Show. You know, some people are depressed because the republic is collapsing in the end of days is approaching and the moon's turn to blood. But on the Andrew Clavon show, that's where the fun just gets started. So come on over to the Andrew Clavon show and laugh your way through the fall of the Republic. With me, Andrew Klavan.