Happy Scribe
[00:00:01]

This is exactly right. Hello and welcome to my favorite murder, that star jihad star character, that's Karen Kilgariff. This is a podcast, Kilgariff. Yeah.

[00:00:30]

And I get it right, OK.

[00:00:35]

How's everybody doing me some time. Sometimes it's good times in a pandemic. What's up?

[00:00:43]

You know, I think just a lot of escapism, I think. Welcome to your podcast World. You've put your earbuds in your earbuds and you've put your ear. What do you call your boss? By Dre. By Dre is on your head. That's your 99 cent store cancer causing earphones that you're putting you just put in there.

[00:01:03]

That did there's some leftover ones your mom got for free at the bank for opening a checking account that one weekend.

[00:01:10]

Throw them in your ear like I'm in. Or maybe you're in your shower and you have your rate, your shower radio. Oh, you lucky. How'd you get so rich, Mrs. Breakstone? Oh, Richie Rich Hourihan gives you music in the shower.

[00:01:24]

Joy, this feels like the it's almost like podcasts are the new escape rooms because you can't go to escape rooms anymore. It's like the world is an escape room. That's right. And podcast is one of the is a puzzle piece. Yes. This is hidden. This particular episode, the keys to it are hidden in a fake book that's up on a shelf way in the corner. That's right. But what book? You don't know. You have to solve this other thing first to figure it out.

[00:01:52]

You have to remember high school geometry to solve this clue to get to that thing. Sorry, I can't. And now I'm mad. Nuffin. That's right. So the one guy in the group who knows everything and everyone else goes, oh yeah. Yeah, oh that's right. And pretends that they know it too. I don't know. I've actually never been an escape route before. I think I would love to go into an escape room and figure out who I know that.

[00:02:12]

Well, you already know the answer and I'm sure the answer in my group of friends is me. But who the dominant psycho is because there are people who get into groups and they can't not group manage because they had bad things happen in their childhood where nobody was in charge. Right. So I can't let a moment go by where that's not being produced and managed in some way.

[00:02:33]

I have to be that person if no one else is. Yeah. Which I think is makes me that person. But like I did get invited to an escape room once with someone that I was like, no, I don't want to be in a room with that person. He's going to take control and it's not going to be fun for anyone else.

[00:02:50]

Like, I just fucking he's a great guy to have drinks with or whatever, but like, no, it's the funniest thing when you when the mask comes off and the escape room and you see what people who can or cannot handle, like it's like this is no longer just a conceptual theory idea of a room. Yeah. This is now you and your dad and the old football problem from sophomore year. You're going to solve it in your 30s in front of everybody.

[00:03:15]

I am the person. This is my character in it. And within three minutes I give up and want to go get drinks and fucking over it and might have a panic attack because I'm locked in a room. Yeah. So I'm so I'm so much fun, so much fun. Mine is I hang back, people begin to take over and then I get mad at how bad they've taken over. And so now I'm in a bad mood, I'm being sarcastic and then I take it.

[00:03:40]

Yeah, OK. As long as it's something, as long as you don't get mad and then don't add something to the subject as long as you bring some anger to the table. Right. That's right. It's this is the spice of my personality, which is we could all just be standing around in a room laughing and trying to make it work. I'm going to bring in the dysfunctional family Thanksgiving where suddenly people aren't talking to each other. There's there's real drama because why if it's it can't just be an escape from this should also be a psychological gauntlet.

[00:04:11]

Is it like a game night? Are you like that on game nights, too? No, I love game game night.

[00:04:16]

I just laugh and try to learn. I try to be cash, but I'm definitely trying to wish. What's the point of not trying to win? Remember the time we played over Zoome? We had a game. We were like trying out games and I drew on my phone with my finger, drew a picture of Thanksgiving dinner so accurately it blew everyone's mind.

[00:04:38]

It was unfair. The games we played, we kind of were just doing an experiment.

[00:04:41]

We played a bunch of games and like you were so good at them and yeah, the drawings you could make with your finger on their fucking phone. But I've never known that about myself.

[00:04:50]

It was almost like I just wanted so badly to prove myself, like I'm good at things and worth your time.

[00:04:57]

Well, you know, I was thinking, but I was straight up stick figure. You can't even tell it in like the hair stick stick figure hair, which is the fun of those types of games.

[00:05:07]

It wasn't any kind of Pictionary. You don't enjoy it. I think it's hilarious when it's like you're under the gun. What's what's going to come out, you know what I mean? I like the game. I just don't like seeing how poor how poorly I perform at them. But it's. I understand that with it, I understand why, but what I'm saying is buckle down and draw Thanksgiving really accurately. Try it. I don't know how that happened.

[00:05:29]

Everyone tried it trying. It's harder than you think it is. Just draw the concept of Thanksgiving. You have like thirty five text into your friend tip and say, well then be like, what is this, what is this to you. Yeah. Because somehow all of a sudden my brain and my finger and everything connected and out came the most perfectly shaped roast turkey on a plate I think even had the little frill feet.

[00:05:52]

You know, they put the little special shoes on that look like chefs had gotten cooking detailed.

[00:05:57]

It was I was I really just wanted I don't know. I think that my self-esteem issues, that's how it comes out. That's how I choose to prove myself. Some people go to the gym every day. Somebody some people do a lot of leg lifts. I save it and I save it and I save it until I have to draw a picture of Thanksgiving. There is a time when Vince and I were just like doing competition in our games constantly.

[00:06:21]

Remember when we were on tour and I just started bringing Oonagh with me? Yeah, you're into it. It was fun. It was. I don't know why we haven't done that. We got to get. Oh, I do. covid court of our lives have been like this. You guys have been doing cocaine. Came together when she got.

[00:06:39]

What are you watching. What are you reading. What do you eat.

[00:06:41]

And uh oh let's see. I did very it's very healthy eating yesterday because I over the weekend had a dip of bad eating that made me feel so terrible.

[00:06:53]

I was like, I did OK, you you're too old to do this. And there's a pandemic that that's everyone's health is at risk. Yeah. So what do you fucking around with, like stop fucking around. I did that. I've been getting better over quarantine but then there was like three steps back where I just went.

[00:07:12]

It made me feel so terrible that I got my act back to get me to. And mine was Panda Express and McDonald's.

[00:07:19]

I did those with and I was was it really I was just like, how is it been? It's been almost a year since I've had McDonald's that are spicy chicken nuggets. Now what.

[00:07:28]

And so when they just had to had to. Yeah. I wonder if I got my McDonald's idea from your you telling me about your McDonald's idea?

[00:07:36]

Probably because I remember you you telling me, but you did it and then it was just kind of like it happened. I did it. And then it was like the it was like a it was like Chutes and Ladders where it was like a straight down word shear right down back to square one. Oh, God, it felt bad. Yeah. Suddenly you're off the board. You're not even at square one anymore. You're just in the toilet. You kicked the board and you made all the pieces go everywhere.

[00:08:05]

No one can find any pieces. No one wants to play games anymore.

[00:08:08]

That's how it felt it was. How were you what was happening, though? I'm good. Let's see. Good for six minutes. Yeah. Yes, I have a movie recommendation. Let's hear it. OK, there's this movie yours.

[00:08:22]

Is it job. It's not just it. OK, it's TCM Turner Classic Movies. Hell yeah. I always have a friendly where our friend. Really. That's right. Well they put on and maybe it was her because she puts on the best movies. Is this documentary called The Queen. It's not about the Queen of England, it's from nineteen sixty eight and it's a documentary about the experience of the drag queens at organizing and participating in the nineteen sixty seven Miss All America Camp Beauty Contest in New York City.

[00:08:52]

It's just a documentary following them from the first meeting to the rehearsals. They do these fucking dance numbers that are incredible. It's them in the hotel rooms all together, getting ready and talking about, you know, their sexuality and their, you know, tips for drag cleaning. And it's so fucking good. And then the actual show, the show itself is almost like secondary. I'm pretty sure we spotted what's his name, Andy Warhol in the audience.

[00:09:18]

Oh, I'm sure. Sure. Just really, it's it's captivating. I wonder. Oh, that's I wonder if is Dorian Corey featured in that because she is the older drag queen that's in Paris is burning. That's like. Oh, and if you want to throw you a gold ring and you fly real high, you know that one. Yeah.

[00:09:38]

I mean, she was around she was one of the I mean, she's just like a legendary legendary queen.

[00:09:44]

Oh yeah. Yeah.

[00:09:47]

The Queen put drag on stage long before Rupal Drag Race and even Paris is burning with appearances from Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Dorian Corey. Yeah, I. And it's the movies by Frank Simon. Yeah, got it. You guys, I'm obsessed with the. Oh, I can't wait. Wait, what do you what's the title again. The Queen. Yeah, the queen. OK, I have to watch that. But here's my favorite quote from Dorian Corri.

[00:10:12]

I always had hopes of being a big star, but as you get older, you aim a little lower. Everybody wants to make an impression, some mark upon the world. And you think you've made a mark on the world if you just get through it and a few people remember your name, then you've left a mark. You don't have to bend the whole world. I think it's better just to enjoy it, pay your dues and just enjoy it.

[00:10:32]

And if you shoot an arrow and it goes real high, hooray for you. OK, tattoo that on my entire back.

[00:10:40]

Her saying that in Paris is burning is the first time I saw it. I got like 17 waves of chills. Yeah, it's the best philosophically accurate like hell. Yeah. That's what it's all about. How to live your life. It really is it really.

[00:10:56]

And see what you guys, you guys do and you're you're still in the shower. You're really wasting water.

[00:11:01]

But oh my God, I guess you're not from California where there has been a drought. Shelley, come on. Get out of the shower. Get out of the shower. Stop conditioning packing your hair. Yeah, she's still the same as regular conditioner. Shelley Short for Shelburn. Get out of the shower, Chelly. Shaving your body from head to toe. Wrap it up. OK, so this week we're doing a wait. Do do you want to talk about MFM network update?

[00:11:29]

Well, one exciting thing is that if you sow bananas, the Bananas Boys have started a mini soad episode of their podcast and it's only on stitcher premium. So if you go to Stitcher Premium and sign up with using their code bananas, you can listen to them for free. Amazing. It's like a taste test cent for premium.

[00:11:50]

And so they're shorties to where they're just like playing. They're kind of doing like a hometown style where they're doing like, what's the weird news that happened in your town, right? Yep. Yes. It's such a great idea. Murder squads doing the Ketti murders. Yeah, that's exciting. Yeah, I know those are fucked up. There's a they wrapped up on the following, they wrapped up their Sam Little series. So they've if you didn't catch that the first time around, they did a four part series about the serial killer, Sam Little, who got caught in Texas, who drew the pictures of all his victims, and he remembers them all.

[00:12:22]

And there is like ninety. They think there's like over almost a hundred.

[00:12:26]

Yeah. So many and more potentially it because it's just all in his head. It's a really interesting story about how they put the pieces together through DNA. And then then he just started talking.

[00:12:37]

And it's just that Texas Ranger went and sat man to man with them.

[00:12:43]

And yeah, it's incredible. It's it's quite a story.

[00:12:47]

And then for as far as merch goes, we have. Yeah. The Oh my God, I love this design so much. So a listener by the name of Rick Flan, RISC Flamm on Instagram. Who. Rachel Flannery. That's right. She is so talented. We've been like loving her stuff forever. And so we are now bringing you her.

[00:13:10]

You're gonna call your dad design and it's freaking adorable. So cute. Yeah. So go to the my favorite murder store. Yeah. At my favorite murder, the retail dot gov right now. That's that's the name. That's it.

[00:13:31]

That's it. That's all you need to know. That's the Eurorail everybody. Bonanos, an innocent man, gets hit by a flying pickle bananas. A Texas woman wakes up with a British accent, bananas, a duck, enters a pub, drinks a beer and fights a dog. I'm Kurt Braunohler and I am Bananas.

[00:13:54]

I'm Scotty Landis and I am bananas on each episode of the world famous Bananas podcast.

[00:13:59]

Scotty and I serve you a steaming hot pile of the silliest news stories from around the world.

[00:14:05]

It's a lighthearted look at our big stupid planet. And we invite you to laugh with us and add us as we try to make sense of it all. But wait, there's more.

[00:14:13]

We have guests, glorious, talented, hilarious guests who give bananas its pizzazz.

[00:14:19]

I might get sued from here to kingdom come for saying this, but the Bananas podcast has more pizzazz than any other podcast since 1992 and I don't care who knows it.

[00:14:29]

So whether you're bored at work, bored in your car, bored at home or buying boards at a lumber yard, it's time to stuff your ears with bananas. New episodes of Banana Slip on to Apple Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you listen every Tuesday to put down your tacos and pick up our bananas.

[00:14:44]

Now with more pizzazz, bananas. Hey, all, we are Wendy and Beth, she's Wendy and I'm Beth, and we want to tell you about a podcast that we host called Froot Loops Serial Killers of Color, Froot Loops as a podcast about true crimes committed by people of color and the victims that we don't hear or know much about. Contrary to popular belief, not all serial killers are straight cis gender white dudes. No, ma'am.

[00:15:17]

Join us at Froot Loops as we tell fascinating stories of true crimes committed by people of color and their victims that often go untold by the mainstream media. As we dive into these cases, we get into the historical and cultural context of the crimes and the criminals in order to get a sense of what might have influenced the perpetrators and led to the crimes. Well, that's right. New episodes drop every Thursday on Apple podcast, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcast from.

[00:15:46]

So until then, look alive, y'all. It's crazy out there. All right, so should we. This is going to be another quilt show. Yeah, people are loving the quilt. That's right, because I'm fucking taking my first little weekend away. George is getting out of the house with her mask and her man. That's right. We're going out of town. We're going to sun our buns. It's just so badly needed. It's going to be great.

[00:16:15]

It's going to be great. Well, let's see. Sorry, Stephen, which one of us goes first on this up? Oh, yeah. I believe it's you, Karen, since last week was Adam Walsh.

[00:16:24]

Oh, right. Good one. So, OK, then in this episode we go all the way back to correct me if I'm wrong, the first year of us touring twenty seventeen. Right.

[00:16:34]

Yeah, well because we started at the end of twenty sixteen but like all the way at the end, like touring, touring was different than just this was the first official tour I believe the official tour.

[00:16:45]

So yeah it's March 25th. Twenty seventeen.

[00:16:49]

And this was the weekend we were at Revolution Hall in Portland, Oregon, and the murder winos and the listeners showed up to when they came to party, they came to get down, they came to fucking blow the roof off and they did it. There was barfing. There was people crawling on the stage. It was legendary. And I wish I could go back there now. God, it was fun. It was. So this is the episode, the live episode where I cover the five killer, Randy Woodfield at Revolution Hall in Portland, Oregon, March 25th.

[00:17:26]

Twenty seventeen.

[00:17:27]

Enjoy whose I think your first because you got your page up. I mean, I actually Steven might have couldn't even get on that Janet Jackson Mike and tell us his first this week. I think that's Karen's turn.

[00:17:40]

Great. Wonderful. Listen, I I took a fucking allergy pill, I'm like I tried to prepare and I you guys are it's real allergy. Hear what's happening because of your nose, if you like. My nose is dripping on stage is so embarrassing. Oh, look, girl, I mean, that's Broadway. That's how it is. It's just.

[00:18:03]

Yeah, it's like, come on, can I just look OK anyways here you might want to do this is what Patti Lipan does. You just shove Kleenex up your nose. I dreamed a dream baby. All right. Well, my murder for Portland, Oregon is one you may know of, kind of famous. Perhaps it's the five killer.

[00:18:30]

I guess you take on the big ones. Yes, that's my forte. That's my jam. I got most of this information from a Sports Illustrated article. Interestingly enough, that's interesting, a man named L. Jon Wertheim wrote a really awesome article that's online. You can look it up. Don't look it up and follow right along with me reading. But this is what I really like on the website and the Sports Illustrated website when I went to go read this story because I actually read it a while ago and I went and found it.

[00:19:13]

And on the website it says, Sports Illustrated Sports investigated.

[00:19:21]

And do it with a sports perspective. Yeah, I guess the sporting is the murdering. They get that that that's what they're calling it, a sport there. I mean, I think what they're saying is you can wear a jersey as you look into true crime if you feel like, dear Sports Illustrated, I was so offended when you have the audacity to comment and she has a black or no. Is this a BlackBerry, which is a BlackBerry? She yes.

[00:19:50]

She uses a BlackBerry. Her name's Patricia. I'm calling her Patricia. Patricia, come on, Patricia. Let him do his thing.

[00:20:00]

You don't have to have an angry opinion all the time.

[00:20:03]

Go ahead. But you can bet it helps. Brandi Woodfield was born in Salem, Oregon, to a middle class family is here for Salem. Really? Wow. Yeah. This side and this side, all because of all the witches being on.

[00:20:26]

Oh, yeah, he was popular among his peers and a football star at Newport High School.

[00:20:37]

Go, Vikings. Is that true? I don't know. I think you're right. Have you got that right? I think it could. I could have just pulled that factoid out, but the chances are so slim. That's why I don't want to know the truth. And we never will, at least not in this story. OK, in high school, Randy began to exhibit antisocial sexual behaviors, not the social kind, the end, not just plain frenching.

[00:21:10]

That's not what he was about. His first arrest for indecent exposure was hushed up by his football coaches so he wouldn't be kicked off the team. Priorities, priorities, priorities. You got to have those high school fucking football. You've got to focus over. You got to move that ball down the field and you've got to make sure that a boy that pulls his penis out on a bridge and says, everybody, look at this, gets moved up in society.

[00:21:37]

Can you imagine it like a mathlete? Coach was like, I can't tell anyone about my creepy fucking mathlete star over here. Do you know we need him? Do you know how many quiz bowls have been lost because of Peeping Tom? Yeah, jerk off. Boy, we got to we got to cover this up. OK, turn that over.

[00:21:58]

Oh, so he graduated and then he went on to play for Portland State University.

[00:22:03]

And you guys are there now. It's. Oh, right. When I was expecting Randy, right, he looks like Henry. He looks like the Fonz. He was. Are people leaving weird, that's such a weird like. All right, we're out of here. We don't like this old yearbook bullshit. Randi Whitfield was o a wing, right? He was. He was he was a white man and puts it after he was in good hands, good hands, cuts on a dime, fluid and smooth catches well in a crowd.

[00:22:52]

But he was just a jumper. Sure. Some brandy. You're such a good jumper. It doesn't matter that you jerked off in front of the cheerleading squad. Jumper, such a good jumper. So now there's a visual element, you're going to have to handle that and incorporate it into what was only an audio experience beforehand. Too much fear asking too much.

[00:23:21]

So at Portland State University, he was known for his devotion to the campus crusade for Christ and the Fellowship of Christian athletes. One of his teammates was quoted as saying it seemed real important to him that he came across as someone who would do the right thing. It was almost like it was keeping him together.

[00:23:43]

I don't even bother trying to seem like I would do the right thing. That's the secret. And then I do. It seems like the people who are trying to look like they're doing the right thing are doing the wrong thing a lot. You have to think really hard about what the right thing is. And if you should do it, you've got a fuckin issue. If you also if you need a really old book to help you do the right thing, maybe you need to get some help.

[00:24:04]

Maybe the right thing. This is this is Karen, Karen Stern, look back and share a parade, different parade. I mean, you didn't come here for the Bible talk. Three more arrests in the early 70s for petty crimes such as vandalism and public indecency did not prevent Woodfield from being selected in the 1974 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers as a wide receiver in the 17th round. Jeez. Yeah, he jerked his way off to success.

[00:24:38]

Randy, Randy. He signed a contract in February of 1974, and it stipulated that he keep himself in peak condition, he avoid consorting with gamblers, wear a coat and necktie any time he was. And that's it. He took it literally and that was it. Oh, but when you're wearing the coat necktie, no pants. Fine. Yeah. As long as you have the top part on, like, Porky Pig, we're good with you.

[00:25:07]

He looks like a detective, according to some papers and issues.

[00:25:10]

Yeah, anyway, he was like, I'm so stressed out from my detective job, I have to show everybody my balls. Yeah, that's Randy. He was signed almost immediately and that money enabled him to quit his job at the Portland area. Burger Chef. No one gives a fuck about Burger Chef. Randy was on the verge of playing in the NFL, but he was cut during training camp. He stayed in Wisconsin and he played the nineteen seventy four season for the semi pro Manitowoc chiefs.

[00:25:47]

And think that's how you pronounce it. That's also the same city where they filmed making a murderer.

[00:25:53]

Oh, yeah. Yeah. Manitowoc, Manitoba. So after so he basically stays in town, plays for a semipro team, but after a dozen flashing incidents across the state, he fucking got in his car and took it all around, was like, God, he's like, I hate hotels when they don't have shampooing. And also, I show my dick up and also drunk out of a pile of junk for all of you to sue. You keep making it.

[00:26:28]

Pile a pile of junk, something it was just piled up on, it is kind of it he would be at an angle, so a pile of. Oh, good, it's fun, it doesn't stay like that. I'm so glad my dad's not at this show, as one Wisconsin law enforcement officer recalled years later, Woodfield, quote, couldn't keep that thing in his pants.

[00:27:01]

So he so he left Wisconsin because he basically got fired off of the semipro team because of all the flashing incidents.

[00:27:13]

And he went home to beautiful Portland. Then he would once he got back here, he would show up at Portland State on occasion to workout with his old team. What is sadder than.

[00:27:28]

Oh, he's here again. Hey, guys. I don't know. All around a little bit. Never forget. I guess I need a shower off now to shower the coach at the time was quoted as saying he seemed like a nice kid, he was a good athlete. But one of the other players said, coach, don't get too close to that guy. He's strange. And finally, a voice of reason.

[00:28:00]

So now simultaneously and maybe coincidentally, at the same time, in early nineteen seventy five in Dunaway Park in southwest Portland, several women were sexually assaulted at knifepoint. So the Portland P.D. assigned female police officers to go undercover. What the fuck? It's crazy. And so much. And they do this what? Because it's just like, hey, hey, I'm going to get you first. Yes. You know. Yeah, but I always love it because they're like it's like, sure, I'll go dress up like a regular lady and walk around a park at night and then I'll fucking catch you.

[00:28:38]

Yeah. Legally. Yeah. Shoot you in the. Yeah, they know what to do. So on March 3rd, nineteen seventy five, a man wielding a paring knife darted out from behind some bushes demanding money from an undercover cop. The police converged, arrested the assailant. He identified himself as Randy Woodfield, football star extraordinaire.

[00:29:02]

He pled guilty, reduced. He he pled guilty, were to reduce charges of second degree robbery and sentence. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison. Wow. So retired Lieutenant Paul Wetherall, a longtime Portland cold case detective, said there was a conventional wisdom back in the day that someone who was an exposer or a peeping Tom wouldn't elevate to more serious crimes. We've based on no evidence whatsoever. Well, let me finish the post. We've learned that nothing further from the truth.

[00:29:32]

So in in a mere 30 years, they put it together that actually it's just the beginning of something special. Yeah, that's the exact opposite of that. Yeah.

[00:29:44]

So Woodfield was paroled in July of nineteen seventy nine after serving four years, and his former PSU teammates threw him a party to celebrate his release on that.

[00:30:00]

Some thought it strange one. The guest of honor arrived two and a half hours late. I read this, I read that sends over and over and I like because that's the bad part. That's the. That's weird. Yeah. I wasn't mad that he was showing his dick off, but he's two hours later, he never wears pants and that's fine.

[00:30:20]

But tardy to the party. I don't think so. So, Randi, know remember now in jail for rape and attempted rape, oh, well, late to the party, Succasunna. No, your manners. Yeah, so at the same time, he gets out of jail, he starts cruising around Portland in a gold nineteen seventy four champagne edition, Volkswagen Beetle.

[00:30:50]

What is almost like an ambush, almost like it's like so Ted Bundy, it's beyond Ted Bundy, I feel like Volkswagen needs to issue an apology for the 70s. You know, like we didn't plan to do something like, you know, yeah, there's just something about them. They're just easy to kill with, perhaps.

[00:31:12]

So Randy, he was kind of a visionary and a lot of ways because he of course, he had a great, amazing football player, his body, and he really enjoyed sending naked pictures of himself to women that back then this was the mid 70s. So he had to do it analog style. You can't do it the hard way and like, wait around Fotomat and my pictures ready yet? No, sir.

[00:31:39]

He drives back around that little thing, just keeps driving around it in his gold Ted Bundy mobile, he also submitted pictures to Playgirl magazine and had been waiting to find out if he was going to be chosen as the boy next door.

[00:31:57]

Oh, my God.

[00:32:00]

I mean, sorry to ruin Playgirl for you girls, but Ted Bundy and like a yeah. The one he's like on the bear rug or whatever. I think that might be a Photoshop. Oh, that's actually Tom Selleck you're thinking of. It's it's actually Burt Reynolds. Yes. Yes, yes. Two strikes. OK, that was just like that was just like us through the ages you just saw like how old I am.

[00:32:33]

All right. So then on October 9th, nineteen eighty, a woman named Sherri IREs is raped and murdered in Portland. She's bludgeoned and stabbed repeatedly in the neck. And it turned out that Randy had gotten out of jail just in time to attend his tenth high school reunion in Newport, where he had reconnected with Sherry Ayers. And they had begun to see each other socially. And he was questioned about that murder. But he refused to sit for a polygraph.

[00:32:59]

And the homicide detectives found his answers generally evasive and deceptive. But because his blood type didn't match the semen found in the victim's body, no charges could be filed a month later on early Thanksgiving, early on Thanksgiving morning, Darcy Renee Fixx, 22 years old, and Douglas Keith Altig, twenty four years old, were shot to death, execution style infixes, North Portland home and fixes. Thirty two caliber revolver was missing from the scene.

[00:33:28]

And while Darcy had a while, Darcy had once dated one of Randy Whitfield's closest friends. They again could not connect him to the crime.

[00:33:38]

So now starts the five bandit killing spree. On December 9th, 1980, a man wearing a fake beard held up a gas station in Vancouver, Washington, just across, as you know, from the Columbia River, from Portland. Karen getting the paper mill. Oh, how does it smell? That's why I'm like my nose is bleeding, basically because of the paper mill where it's just so I can Fiberglas up my mask.

[00:34:10]

Mastro's I know someone that used to work there and he said that's the smell of money.

[00:34:16]

Local jokes get local work. All right. Four nights later in Eugene, a man wearing a fake beard, an athletic tape on his nose, raided an ice cream parlor. The next night, a Drive-In restaurant near in nearby Albany was robbed by a bearded man. A week after that, in Seattle, a gunman matching the same description pinned down a 25 year old waitress inside a restroom and forced her to masturbate him, which is the worst sentence of all time.

[00:34:43]

Just a bummer. Four weeks later, on the evening of January 18th, 1981, in Cayzer, Sherry Hall was leaving the Transamerica office building. After her cleaning shift, a man who a man managed to get into the building, grabbed her and walked her at gunpoint. Back inside, on their way down the hallway, he spots the other cleaner, 20 year old Lisa Garcia. He grabs both women, brings them into a back room, orders them to lay on the floor.

[00:35:08]

After he rapes both of them, he shoots both of them twice in the back of the head, Sherri Hall dies. But Lisa Garcia survived.

[00:35:19]

Yes. It's not fucking nuts. Yeah, she fucking execution style gets shot in the back of the head, stands up and is like, I'm calling the fucking cops. Oh, my God. Yeah, very cool. So on February, February 30, February 3rd, sorry, nineteen eighty one, Randi Whitfield called his sister in Shasta County and asked to have coffee with her, but she said that her husband didn't want him around because you're a fucking creep and we know it.

[00:35:51]

Yeah, the family's like we're not in team. Soon after, Randy Whitfield forced his way into the mountain gate home of Don Eckard and her 14 year old daughter, Janelle, they were found dead each shot twice in the back of the head. Lab tests would reveal later that the girl had been sodomized. Their home was just off the five.

[00:36:13]

And then earlier that same day, an 18 year old waitress was kidnapped and raped after a holdup 15 miles south in Redding. And the next day, a similar crime was reported 100 miles up, the five in Eureka, California. And then 10 days later, Randy Woodfield organized a Valentine's Day party for himself. Oh, you know, the Marriott Hotel in downtown Port.

[00:36:39]

What does that consist of? You guys don't fucking like that, picture it, picture the decorations. A grown man throwing a Valentine's Day party for himself. Oh my God himself. I barely even like Valentine's Day as a kid. I mean, no one likes it now. He throws a party for himself on Valentine's Day. And here's the worst part, or maybe the best part. No one goes.

[00:37:08]

No one goes. Oh, man, this is why you don't have birthday parties or kill people, birthday parties, birthday parties are hard enough. You can't pick a random holiday and be like, you know what, this Easter is about me. Yeah, I get it doesn't work that way, especially one that's like everyone is like I want to be with the person that I like. Bone. Yeah. Randy, I don't want to I don't want to spend this day with you.

[00:37:40]

Randy, I don't love you. Yeah. I've never loved you. I played football with you. Yeah. My wife's like, who is this guy. I want her fucking be at his Marriott fucking party. It's fucking psychotic because it's not like let's all meet at a bar and have Valentine's Day about me.

[00:37:57]

It's like I've rented the grand ballroom area and I've hung streamers. Please come. All right. Will you be my.

[00:38:09]

So after that night and the humiliation he Randy would feel turns up on the doorstep of Julie Rice's home in Beaverton at two a.m. and around.

[00:38:21]

Yay, no, yay for Beaverton. You're right. Don't be embarrassed. Oh, I know it's hard, it's hard sometimes.

[00:38:36]

Now we have to go back into the horrible story. Around 4:00 a.m., Julie was shot.

[00:38:43]

So that's the base of the podcast. Now, we have to go back because this is what it's called. That's the working title.

[00:38:50]

Around 4:00 a.m., Julie is shot twice in the back of the head after being raped. Her body is found at eight thirty a.m. by her mother. So police find that Julie knew her attacker because they had had a lady, had a glass of wine and they were planning on having coffee. There was instant coffee sitting on the counter and the water had boiled all the way down in the kettle. And investigators soon find out that Julie knew Randy Woodfield because he worked as a bouncer at the Foster Tavern in Raleigh Hills.

[00:39:21]

And he'd a many times overlook that she had a fake I.D. and let her in the bar anyway because Julie was 14 years old.

[00:39:32]

So I'm glad we all clap for Bieber then. Really good plan, you guys. Can you fucking imagine like someone knocks on the door and you look and it's like the bouncer at the fuckin bar you sneak into and you're just like, I don't really want to open the door. I ramdani. So I'm nice to everyone. I can't be rude. Yeah he will. He's done you all these favors. Yeah. So I guess I can't just like.

[00:39:56]

Hi Randy. I heard about your Valentine's Day. I'm sorry. I didn't know I was washing my hair. I'm so sorry. All right. So Marion County detectives interview Randy after after this murder because his name keeps coming up. And all of these murders, he's somehow, somehow and somehow connected. So they search his home, his room, actually, where he's staying. He's renting a room in a house. And if they only find gun cleaning materials.

[00:40:27]

But when his landlady shows up, she shows them a lengthy phone bill with a trail of calls from San Francisco to Bothell, Washington.

[00:40:36]

I don't know if that's how it's awful, I said. Like brothel Washington, just a few miles were like awful, which is how we pronounce every city in every state that we visit.

[00:40:59]

So that's when they realize when they see all these calls going and all these cities straight up and down the five, they're like, we have a serial killer on our hands. Then they look up payphone calling logs and they connect. He was using remember calling cards. Everybody remember. Hey, hey, oldies. Hey, remember, what you see is calling cards. You have 20 minutes left on this car. You're like, oh, my God, this is like money.

[00:41:30]

Don't lose the opportunity to talk to my boyfriend looking. I get busy. Maybe you miss me. So he used calling cards with within a few miles of every of the city of every murder. And that phone record was the final piece of evidence that they used to arrest Randi Whitfield. And Detective Dave Bishop says all of a sudden it became obvious it was a map of I five. Randi Whitfield was addicted to the phone and he made thousands of calls.

[00:42:04]

But when he called women, some of them turned him down and that made him mad. And within minutes, he would find a victim. Some he knew and some he did not. So at the trial, fuckin Lisa Garcia was the key witness. Yes.

[00:42:19]

Yes. She tells the jury about the night in the Transamerica office building, she said that the man that they see in the courtroom was the same one who raped and shot her and raped and murdered her co-worker. It took the jury three and a half hours to reach its verdict of guilty. Yeah. So in June. Oh, yeah. Oh, some of you are like, I don't know. It's weird that I feel like I get it changes.

[00:42:55]

I can get him off that phone. On June twenty six, nineteen eighty one, Randy Woodfield was convicted on all counts. There was no death penalty option in Oregon, so he was sentenced to prison, a prison term of life, plus 90 years at the Oregon State Penitentiary that December. Thirty five more years were added to his sentence when a jury in Benton, Oregon, Button County, Oregon, convicted him of sodomy and weapons charges tied to another attack in a restaurant bathroom.

[00:43:25]

Randy Woodfield has always maintained his innocence. Please do this.

[00:43:30]

Twenty six quote from Randy's MySpace page.

[00:43:33]

Oh, my God. Wow, a lot of information at once. He's still alive. He has a MySpace page. What if I just started reading a third eye blind to lyrics? I don't think you're allowed to smoke in Oregon prisons, but you can have a fucking MySpace page. People need to express themselves on a black background with green writing. Yeah, yeah. I mean, I want to know who your top eight are, your bong, your cellmate, because he's going to be pissed if it's not.

[00:44:05]

You better bump him up there. And he's like, I love phones and myself and party. This 2006 quote from Randy's MySpace page is the closest he's ever come to taking ownership of his past. Quote, I spend the remainder of my days in prison because I have committed a murder along with many other crimes I once tried out for the Green Bay Packers. The only reason I didn't make it is because the skills I had to offer, they didn't need at the time.

[00:44:37]

I am loved, deeply loved, so loved, I could feel a Marriott ballroom with how many people who love me. In 2012, Woodfield was definitively linked to five more murders, three in the Portland area and two in California's Shasta County.

[00:44:55]

That's Urai, five killer, everybody. And we're back in and we're back in twenty, twenty, twenty twenty, I wish we could have warned ourselves during that your show just now to watch the fuck out for twenty twenty, I would have you know what I would have done. Durda is after our show, I remember us all going to a bar together because we had you had friends in town. I had friends in town. We all went to a bar.

[00:45:22]

We had a great time. We met people, we chatted, we got to bunker down. I would have whispered in my ear, travel back in time, whisper in my ear, go to a different bar, go to other places all night long.

[00:45:36]

Go just go do stuff like get away from these people. Go to a different bar right now. Go to these people are dragging you down. If you go to a different bar right now, Koven might not happen to you man. Like you could change to a different butterflied. No no no. I just meant like go enjoy yourself. I keep watching things. There was some video on Twitter the other day of people at a concert and something funny happened.

[00:46:00]

But I was just like concerts and I, you know, me, I'm like, can take them or leave them, leave them.

[00:46:06]

And now I'm like, concerts. I know concerts. I'm sad. I just putting an outfit together. God damn, you know. Yeah I do because I've been wearing the same black shirt for two years too. I never thought I'd get sick of house dresses. But look at me now fucker. They're sick of house dresses, ok. OK, for my episode, we're going to go all the way over to Minneapolis, Minnesota, always a great time.

[00:46:33]

We have live shows there.

[00:46:35]

We we were at the University of Minnesota at that Northrop auditorium on October 18th, 2017. And I cover the murder of Carol Thompson, a.k.a. the story that inspired Fargo. So enjoy.

[00:46:53]

So who do we. It's you. OK, Stephen emailed and told us. He did. Yeah, I didn't look. Yeah, well, great. I'm glad one of us pays. Stephen. Steven.

[00:47:05]

OK, this, ladies and gentlemen, is the murder of Carol Thompson.

[00:47:13]

I'm real quick for the newbies.

[00:47:16]

All right. We are not cheering for the murder of Carol Thompson. That's not what's happening right now. It's important to us that you understand we are not a pro murderer podcast. Quite the opposite. In fact, quite the opposite. Yeah.

[00:47:30]

And there's a reason I didn't say this is the story of her husband. I said it's of the victim. OK, anyway, so you got out. You got it. OK, in 1963, Karen Carroll Swoboda Thompson. She's a 34 year old housewife, mother of four young children ages six to 13.

[00:47:48]

And she's the only child of a respected St. Paul plumbing contractor. And they have a lot of money. And she's married for 15 years to an up and coming attorney named T. Eugene Thompson. He's 35. He's born in Blue Earth, Minnesota, which sounds rural because one person quietly wooed.

[00:48:10]

That was the mayor coming down to represent Blue Earth, the mayor and the one person who lives there.

[00:48:19]

All right. So, Carol is kind of the prototypical 60s, 50s, 60s housewife.

[00:48:25]

She's this lovely woman. She is really active in her Presbyterian church. She's active in the scouts for her kids and does all of those sorts of things. She plays bridge with her friends, that adorable kind of thing.

[00:48:35]

They get together for coffee parties, which probably they'll probably put a little in. So I would I mean, coffee probably sounds like a blast and everything, but get it going. Yeah. Let's get the party part in there. Do it. She did all the normal things early 1960s.

[00:48:53]

Housewives did so when she was brutally murdered at the Highland Park family home on the morning of March six, 1963.

[00:49:03]

The city was fucking shocked because this kind of thing didn't happen and this family was well known in the neighborhood or in the town because of the attorney husband and this lovely woman. So that's March 6th. Nineteen sixty three.

[00:49:17]

Her killer surprised her in her bedroom. She was home alone. Killer surprised her in her bedroom and struck her over the head with a piece of rubber hose. And then when she passed out, he attempted to drown her to make it look like she accidentally drowned.

[00:49:31]

Oh, that fucking Carole is a badass motherfucker because that didn't work. So she came to and she, like, fought him off and started to run through the house. Then he tries to he tries to shoot her, the gun misfires.

[00:49:48]

Then he beats her up with the butt of a Luger pistol and stabs her in the neck with a kitchen knife. But she's still fucking survived.

[00:49:56]

Jesus Christ. I know. He goes he thinks she's dead. He goes to wash his hands and, like, clean up. And she fuckin runs to her next door neighbor with a fucking knife and whoa.

[00:50:08]

With a knife in her neck sorry. With a knife in her neck.

[00:50:13]

We should all be so far. Batta That's a man I know.

[00:50:18]

So she staggers to the neighbor's house. The neighbor answers the door, finds Carole, who's unrecognizable because of the blood. She's barefoot. She says, I've got a knife in my throat. A man did it. Oh, he came to the door. And this is the most 1960s thing I've ever heard. Won't you please help me? I know also just that poor neighbor.

[00:50:40]

I mean, like, oh, she's having her own private coffee party inside, chilling, Minding Her Business Sixties housewife style vacuuming for the fourth time that day, just getting those pills taken, hoovering, they call them, who are called it hoovering, huh? Making everything nice.

[00:50:59]

And then there's a knock at the door. Oh, God. Horrible. Don't ever answer that. Well, that's not true. Never mind.

[00:51:06]

She Karels Rush to anchor anchor hospital and the surgeons took a took the blade from her throat, worked on her, but she died three hours later, not even known for Baby the Peep.

[00:51:19]

And then the people were panicking. Her husband, when he finds out his morning, people were panicking and.

[00:51:26]

There's no arrest made for Silver Week, so people were like and it's one of those things in the city where it's like we didn't think this happened in our city to these kinds of people, as everyone who this ever happens to says, yeah, in L.A., we're like, yeah, this happens happens all the time to all of us, constantly, constantly.

[00:51:43]

Everywhere you look. Yeah. We're like, why didn't it happen today? What's wrong? We're all the bad people in one spot. Yeah.

[00:51:53]

So then the evidence that swept up at the scene is pieces of the the pistol grip which had broken off during the attack. And those are traced. Oh, wait, you want to see pictures. So this is I have a photo of the family.

[00:52:08]

There we go. Oh, I know. Look, when she looks almost exactly like June Cleaver, that's like I know.

[00:52:14]

It's so typical.

[00:52:16]

And then we have a photo of her and her husband to you, Jean Thompson, at their wedding. I know. It's just a bum. You guys out real quick. That's what they're here for. Hey, me too.

[00:52:28]

So the evidence of the pistol grip that's broken off left at the scene, it leads investigators that gun part to an ape in April to an ex convict from Michigan. You guys love that place. Yeah.

[00:52:40]

Yeah. Why are you holding up as his name is Dick W.S. Anderson.

[00:52:46]

He's a troubled Korean War combat that he confesses to the murder, that he did it.

[00:52:52]

But he said he was hired by former Twin Cities prizefighter underworld figure named Norman J. Mastrianni.

[00:52:59]

When Norman's question, the guy who hired this dude, he reveals that he had been hired by Carol's husband to Eugene Thompson to murder Carol for three grand.

[00:53:13]

Well, it was it was the late 60s, so that would be a ten grand today.

[00:53:18]

They're not worrying over that, I don't think. Yeah, this is a really nice paper, by the way. I just want to say we have a moment of positivity.

[00:53:27]

This is absolutely gorgeous paper. I read very high quality items. You guys. I realized as I was saying that when in any appropriate time it was to say that I support it. But that's this podcast.

[00:53:39]

I mean, pretty much ad centrale, but I to do OK. Three thousand dollars. So Swanson says that Mr. Thompson carefully mastermind the hit, including getting OK so he fucking on Valentine's Day is they have this really cute yappy little derksen and he is like, we're getting rid of the dog and fucking takes the dog and like gives it away on Valentine's Day. Just ran just to get rid of the dog so that dude could break everyone I know. Wow.

[00:54:11]

And the morning of he takes the telephone out of the bedroom. Yeah.

[00:54:17]

Warning signs. Everybody keep your eyes peeled. Yeah, definitely. Oh, I know. Oh, sorry.

[00:54:24]

We just have to get this phone fixed. We just I just have to bring the phone in to get. It's not broken, honey.

[00:54:33]

Now. Oh no. Oh, here we go. Yep.

[00:54:37]

OK, so also Norman Mastery and he's a local convict. He had been involved in the murder of an underworld type years earlier. And the person who represented him is T. Eugene Thompson, the husband who is an attorney.

[00:54:53]

So there's a connection, maybe like a dirty defense attorney, exactly what it or, you know, has connections to these types of people.

[00:55:01]

So according to a bunch of underworld sources, which I love that just like the Minneapolis underworld, I would love to study it.

[00:55:08]

You know, that word is just so like. Oh, yeah, we all know.

[00:55:11]

Yeah, yeah. Black markets know the underworld, you know, you know, you know.

[00:55:20]

So according to a bunch of them who are like, yeah, three or four of us had a turn mastrianni down. So there's a bunch of other people like yeah, he asked us to kill the wife and we were all like, fuck no.

[00:55:33]

And but this one dude, Dick Anderson, walked around one bar like, hey, not a good plan.

[00:55:40]

OK, so to you, Jean Thompson is arrested on June 21st and indicted on charges of first degree murder. And this fuckin trial is like the O.J. Simpson trial of the time, which I know is everyone says about everything, but it really applies here.

[00:55:56]

I'd really like to prove it.

[00:55:58]

There were like there were even newspapers in Oslo talking about it or it's like, well, like you get the scoop.

[00:56:04]

Yeah, you they made it to fucking Norway. Yeah.

[00:56:09]

OK, so there's a six week trial covered by reporters from across the country and they were doing the thing where they're like, so-and-so is wearing this today and this person's wearing that today.

[00:56:17]

Oh, we have arrest photos of them. OK, that's that's the guy who killed them, don't you? I'm sorry, and that's Eugene Thompson who totally looks like someone I dated. Really? Yeah. Well, what did that guy do?

[00:56:34]

He just he thought he was a man and he drove like a Mini Cooper from the he had flown over from the fucking UK. Oh, really. So dumb. Pip pip.

[00:56:46]

He yeah.

[00:56:47]

You all underworld people have a cleft chin because that first guy did they think that's why I made that noise. Oh now I feel bad. Oh good. OK, you thought you were hoping he was just uninvolvement. You're talking.

[00:56:59]

That's like you said it was on a TV show at the time and you just wanted to set the scene. Yeah. This is the most famous nice guy in the world.

[00:57:08]

He's the sweetest. Everyone in Minneapolis loved him anyway, and he's a murderer. OK, so the story about the trial was running on upis national wire. The only reason it got bumped and interrupted was because a certain day on November 22nd, 1963, President JFK had been shot. Yes. The only reason it got kicked and bumped, it was going to be in Life magazine and everything. But then they were like, bigger problem. Yeah, OK.

[00:57:38]

So then at the trial, it turns out it comes out that Eugene Thompson was a notorious womanizer and. Sorry, the second guy. Yeah.

[00:57:50]

I swear to God, that question says it all men have it good. Let's just say it that let's just say it that way.

[00:57:56]

Yeah, you can be a bald, a little bald, bland fuck and be a womanizer. All right. Sorry, I that's very sexist against man and I'm sorry we want this to be a welcoming environment. OK, you can try that again back to what we want this to be a welcoming environment for everybody. Well, you know, so many good ones out there, you know, like, oh, you all that like women have welcoming environments we want it to be.

[00:58:33]

Let's get feminist surprise is also a feminist back then. They're like then like everyone storms out. OK, all right. Enough, Georgia. OK, total womanizer.

[00:58:47]

And he had been taking out life insurance policy plans to say it's funny that they haven't implemented something at insurance companies where if a husband is taking out large item life insurance policies on his wife, maybe somebody goes by and just knocks on the door, just checks in létourneau, hey, what are you up to?

[00:59:09]

And what does she is she aware? And does everybody on the same page with this million dollar life insurance policy? I think it's a great idea. All right. I'm going to call Geico tomorrow.

[00:59:23]

And he took out like a million dollar life insurance policy pretty quickly, pretty recently in the past. But he had been taking out for 15 years bits and pieces of life insurance.

[00:59:34]

So is that he was like so like he had policies all over the place?

[00:59:38]

Yeah, well, he was an attorney, so he probably knew how the shit work policies in every area code got 99 policies. So then someone said he had a long running girlfriend.

[00:59:54]

He had several girlfriends that had along with anyone in particular who was eager to marry, you know, those two fucking things, the life insurance policy and the girlfriend, he went on he like some for some reason, went on the stand and everyone hated him.

[01:00:12]

Shocker. Yeah, OK. He didn't womanize his way to the top of the courtroom.

[01:00:18]

It's those guys that think they're so charming that they can win anyone over and they can also think that they can kill their wife and get away with it. Yeah, like, no, no, no. I got this.

[01:00:25]

Let me get on the stand up, convince everyone because it's always the doctor husband's on Dateline who are just like, I assure you, Ed.

[01:00:32]

And you're just like you look like a lizard. You are the scariest. Your eyes are dead and you have a forked tongue shut up. Just like not having the forethought that everyone thinks you're guilty, you know, knowing that they.

[01:00:47]

All right, up, up, up, up. We're really on one tonight, man. We're twelve hours of deliberation. Jury decided that Thompson was guilty and he was sentenced to life in prison. Yeah, no way. No, life doesn't mean life anymore. You guys know that? Or back then ever. OK, the two DOS, Anderson and Masterson are indicted in 1963. First degree murder charges, each sentenced to life in prison after being convicted.

[01:01:20]

OK, so now the oldest child, Jeffrey, who was 13 at the time of his mother's murder, he became a lawyer. And this guy, like he likes to give interviews and he's fucking cool, like his mom is a badass and is just really open about what happened because he's horrified by it, obviously. So he became a prosecutor, prosecuted several first degree murder cases and occasionally cites points of law from his father's trial.

[01:01:48]

He'll be like, well, it just so happens that Thompson relation in this, you know, at this time.

[01:01:54]

Amazing.

[01:01:54]

You know, in 1989, he was appointed district court judge in Wenonah.

[01:02:01]

OK, all right. Got a couple more than from Blue Mountain or whatever the fuck, blue soil. Oh, then. OK, here we go. Nineteen eighty three serving nineteen years to Jim Thompson is released on parole.

[01:02:20]

He maintained that he had been framed. And so after his release, his children, including Jeffrey, his the lawyer was like, come over, we're going to sit down, we're going to hold a little trial of our own and we need you to convince us that you're not guilty because you're that's what you're saying. And they laid out all the evidence for him and they were like like you're a lawyer to tell us why we're wrong. And the only thing he could come up with was like some weird blood sample report about the blood that was in the house, which is like you weren't even in.

[01:02:49]

No one even said you were in the house anyways. That's all he could come up with. And at the end, Jeffrey Thompson is like, yeah, guilty.

[01:02:57]

It's amazing he did it. That's another sign of that kind of crazy narcissism where he's like, oh, yeah, that's easy to convince those guys.

[01:03:05]

Right. And the kids are like they want him to tell them. It's not like they're like, we're never going to talk to you again. It's like we can't have a relationship with you. You're fucking lying to us and we know it. Yeah, it's not understand. And here we go. So Jeffrey and his three younger sisters, let's see. OK, wait, sorry. So Eugene Thompson died August seven, 2017, on his 80th birthday.

[01:03:35]

Not the son, the dad and on and Jeffrey put on his on his tombstone. Every saint has a past in. Every sinner has a future. A man.

[01:03:47]

That's kind of an ironic thing to put on a headstone, you have to admit.

[01:03:53]

Well, there's no future, right. I don't think that may have been sarcasm on his part.

[01:04:00]

He sounds it sounds like that Asseri run in the family. Yeah. So that's it. That's the murder of Carol Thompson.

[01:04:06]

It was great. Thank you. Thank you. Great job on that. Thank you. I remember you doing all your research the day of thinking. It turned out great. It turned out really good. That must have been one of those ones where I had another one that I was totally going to do.

[01:04:25]

And then the afternoon of when you're like, fuck, I have to pick something else.

[01:04:31]

I can't do this one for whatever.

[01:04:33]

I know there are lots of doubts and for his fun and great as all those life shows turned out. Yeah, there was lots of worry and doubts beforehand. Definitely even the stories that did really, really well. You're still like, what if they're mad at me for this one? What if everyone in Minnesota knows that this is the story you don't talk about and you don't know it or you know what I mean? Or like this is the one thing that everyone will make everyone hate you, which is essentially just what we all call an anxiety.

[01:04:59]

And it pops up and tells you, here's the worst case scenario. And then we as people who love our own brains don't say, oh, that's that idea that I get my head every time I attempt vulnerability. Instead, we go, I have to change the story here. I have to change it right now. That's right. It's not just my thinking. I know for a fact this is going to be the one that breaks us. That's right.

[01:05:20]

The silence of the audience. And I will then dive into the audience and cry, but worked out good. Yeah, we have a hometown now in this quilt episode. The hometown hometown is from November 28th, 2019. So it's much more recent than these two, which are both from three years ago. It was Alex came up at the end of the show that we did at the London Apollo and told us her hometown. It was really quite a story.

[01:05:50]

It's quite fun and joy. Yeah.

[01:05:53]

You guys know the rules. You can't be so drunk that your story doesn't have a beginning, a middle and an end and being the crucial part always. And please be local and give up whoever's waving that up there, because there's no fucking way we're waiting for you to come down here. Sorry. OK, as a hometown. Oh, God.

[01:06:12]

Do you want to do it. No. Yeah, I'll pick her, choose her her waving hands or maybe him. I don't know my glasses on. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. Govan's. I really hate that it was so easy last night because after the speech when I saw him oh yeah, come on, get the audience lights down so she doesn't have to thank you. It's very scary. It's very scary to see all of you.

[01:06:42]

It really is. I'm sorry I interrupted you because I was so scared about the lights. I don't care. What were you saying? I don't remember.

[01:06:51]

I only one person raised their hand yesterday and it was easy. Hi. Alex, nice to meet Alex, everyone. It's going to be great. It's Alex, everybody's. Where are you from, Faison's Stoke, which is about an hour away. Wow, are a lot of people from there?

[01:07:22]

I didn't think so. So they just love it. Is it awesome? No. Oh. OK, what do you want to tell your story? Yeah, so it's the murder of a gentleman named Tristan Lovelock is probably like the only really famous murder in Basingstoke.

[01:07:45]

That's good, though. That's good. Yeah. And my relation to it is that these guys are the same age. My mom my mom grew up with them, so.

[01:07:54]

Yeah, I know. Nice, nice move.

[01:08:05]

So basically a gentleman is out in south, which is invading Stoke, a bit of a rough area and and his dog is alerting him something in the bushes. So he goes over and he finds the decapitated head of Tristam own. Lovely. Yeah, he's 67 years old.

[01:08:23]

So how he didn't die from a heart attack, I don't know. But you mean the guy walking the dog? Yeah. No, go ahead. Sorry. Sorry, so they track numerous body parts around Southam and track it to a particular house and there's only one tenant and his name is Richard Markham.

[01:08:51]

Yes, yes. Who gives a shit? So what's up? That's right. So they took it to his house. And basically it comes about that they were out drinking, probably more than drinking, probably drugs as well. I'm out with friends. She says it under her breath into a microphone. That's my favorite.

[01:09:15]

And they go back to his house and they get into an altercation about a woman and he claims it was self-defense.

[01:09:23]

But he basically picks up a hammer and just starts punching him in the head with the hammer. Oh, my. Yeah. He claims Treston, who is the guy that was murdered, pulled a wolpaw to bayonet on him. And so he felt like he had to defend himself with a hammer. Yeah. And so obviously after that, he dismembered him with a hacksaw, spread his body parts around self harm and then proceeds. This is what makes me think they on drugs then proceeds to put his arm in the oven and bake it.

[01:09:57]

Yeah, I know. Gerkin know. I know. So after this, you do that as drugs, OK? Oh, got it. I do. And I want a reason. Tristan's arm, not his own arm. I'm not very good at times. No, it's definitely me. So I'm with you here. So everybody, let's show we can do this. We can do it. So sorry. Go ahead. OK, go. So after he's done all this, he then flees and goes.

[01:10:38]

The airport is like, give me a ticket to anywhere. I don't care where. It's like a song. Yeah. It's like a glee moment in the airport and they give him a ticket to JFK. So he goes to New York, uses his own name, his own cards, books, a Pottow goes out, does tourist things in New York is rEU in Times Square. Obviously back in Basingstoke, the police are going mad trying to find this guy.

[01:11:04]

And when they finally find him, he's stuck in Central Park reading a newspaper article about himself. Oh my God, too.

[01:11:12]

And then he proceeds to lift up his T-shirt and he has a Made in England tattoo around the table.

[01:11:19]

Bristo. Yeah, and yeah, he gets sentenced to life in prison, and that's the end. Amazing. Everybody she killed is not so good. Great job. Great job, London, you fucking did it, wow. Way to go, Alex. Alex, thank you for bringing all that onto the stage.

[01:11:56]

Yeah, we appreciate it. It's a scary thing to come up on that stage. But, you know, you did it. She really did it. Yeah, she really did. Thanks for listening. It is called El episode.

[01:12:06]

Well, that's not what this is the worst stitching together the quilt. El Paso, El Paso.

[01:12:14]

We're stitching words together in quilts together and. Yeah. Thanks. Thank you. Good job, you guys.

[01:12:23]

Hopefully everything where you are is acceptable to. OK, let's not hope for more. Let's just keep the expectations nice and low. Yeah. Twenty, twenty, twenty eight. Keep expectations nice and low. Keep your expectations low and your arms locked in a chain. A human chain will get through this together. That's right. Yeah. Oh. Also stay sexy and don't get murdered. Good bye Elvis. You want a cookie.