Happy Scribe Logo

Transcript

Proofread by 0 readers
[00:00:01]

This is a news laundry podcast and you're listening to and I'll have the angry Nelligan or NewJersey up in the cabinet shortly. Welcome to the last episode of Hafter for the year 2020, a year that was as manhours as it is going to be called and already is. We do hope 2021 will be way better year for the world, full of hope, peace and less bigoted laws. We shall discuss all that in this last episode of Hafter of the Year 2020, of which I haven't even missed one which suggests that I haven't even taken a week's leave in the whole year.

[00:00:41]

Just saying to people who have just come back after three weeks and were arguing that four weeks would be a better deal. Three weeks.

[00:00:46]

Two weeks. Yeah, but you have to take increasingly. I just took two weeks after. What is the regular time people should take off for the media to let us know. Do you think or do you think four weeks is a reasonable expectation of a holiday for a life altering event like marriage?

[00:01:04]

Right.

[00:01:04]

In which case, I don't know. What's the name of that Hollywood actor who got married 13 times? Three times the same guy. You know, she's got no black and white films.

[00:01:15]

I knew she would have got so many lives.

[00:01:19]

But we are recording this hafter on Tuesday and not on Thursday because my wonderful colleagues here, many of whom are very young, said that we'd rather not work on thirty first because we normally record on Thursday.

[00:01:33]

So this is being recorded at three, actually four in the afternoon, four in the evening, early evening, late afternoon on Tuesday, the twenty ninth of December, as opposed to our usual Thursdays.

[00:01:44]

Yeah, because our young colleagues think that there is going to be some party on when a party on thirty first people don't want to be recording. I really want to see where they will be partying in this pandemic here at home. So do take videos and share with me how many people were partying with the carnival. Decide whether you guys need to show up an office in the first week of the year.

[00:02:01]

No, not OK. So what province have you like? I've never thought that we would not be recording on Thursday because there's something to do on New Year's Eve.

[00:02:11]

They're not my goal exactly today. Yeah, but news, any tradition is always had this.

[00:02:17]

I mean, you're forgetting it because you're getting older. But we never first we've never worked.

[00:02:21]

You know, if I had known the whole team has never been more in sync from the beginning, since at least I have been. You have this thing now you don't work on. Yeah, I didn't do something.

[00:02:31]

You set up back with me.

[00:02:34]

You said, you know, how come once and sometimes you used to when you said, you know, first we never.

[00:02:38]

Yeah. What I come because I remember the Markandey and that Deverill, which are the first employees of small screen that little Gilberton used on and he used to do little Jessica Paladini communicators are so very bad that the office boys would show up to like a girl, but they wouldn't be in positions or not.

[00:02:58]

So since then we used to show up just so we are not judged.

[00:03:03]

Actually it should be the other way around. I mean, working on first day of the year sets a bad example for the rest of the year.

[00:03:08]

Oh, good point. So we have, as you know, half the has gone behind the paywall. Those of you listening to this are free, which is a total of the version on YouTube.

[00:03:19]

If you're earning, have some shame and subscribe and pay to keep news three, because my colleagues, this place that we've taken on rent the equipment, everyone's time costs money, takes resources, I'm proud to say, and use laundry has brought amazing ground reports this year, whether it was for the daily riots, whether it was the farm laws, whether it was Bihar election, hydrous amazing young reporters and an amazing desk headed by Maharaj and Jayshree have done amazing work.

[00:03:49]

So your contributions and your subscriptions go towards paying for all that. And as opposed to many of you think reporting is just sitting on your ass and hacking away at the keyboard, the amount of time you spend on the ground is way more significant than what actually you see in the writing bit. So yeah, do contribute better. Give me three and then you will get access to the full, uninterrupted, unedited Hafter on our wonderful podcast player.

[00:04:19]

As you know, we have got our new improved website, news, laundry, dot com and our new improved podcast play.

[00:04:25]

I have lots of announcements that I shall get to that after the headlines, which Monisha has prepared a crisp headline round up for us. Yes.

[00:04:33]

Mumbai police says Arnab Goswami paid former CEO to boost public TV series Inditex Six cases of new covid-19 strain. All travellers from yukky in a month of yuppies love jihad law yuppy police has registered fourteen cases and made 51 arrests, of whom forty nine are in jail. Meanwhile, Allahabad High Court has reunited an interfaith couple in Yuppy. The court said that woman has the right to live life on her own terms. I would have thought in 2020 and incidentally, the statistic you mentioned on Yuppy, only two of those were 47 arrests are based on the girl actually saying that based on all of those Karnataka cabinet alkies, anti Kozloduy ordinance and Madhya Pradesh cabinet is set to clear freedom to religion by 2020 as ordinance.

[00:05:21]

Today it's it is called freedom of religion, Bill, but it's the same yuppy law which prohibits forced religious conversion, quote, unquote.

[00:05:28]

And this in the same week where Mammadyarov, Mammalogy, whatever he's called.

[00:05:32]

Mr Rajan gave an amazing speech where he said Zameen with this furniture garden work as you go Butterbean. This is the calibre of our chief ministers, Shiv Sena and BISAN Jerrod's.

[00:05:43]

Vivan Sharrod was summoned by EDI in connection with the investigation in the multicore scam in Punjab in Maharastra Cooperative Bank Lenegan says he wanted into politics, health complications, cartoonish jessee.

[00:05:57]

Our entire that we asked we asked you to read up in Alaska and it's all gone to waste health complications.

[00:06:04]

I don't think anyone is surprised by this development.

[00:06:07]

So Rahul Gandhi skips Congress 136 foundation decelerations the parties in the defensive and said, is it wrong to visit his grandmother? He's in Milan, apparently. And there was like wall to wall coverage last week, last night on television news on where is he working on Abdul-Karim or Milan, Chillagoe. 1500 mobile towers were damaged in Punjab amid farmers anger against Jiyu. I'm an interesting has issued warning, protest and opposition ploy sees Prime Minister Narendra Modi signals no yield on demand for a repeal of the laws.

[00:06:39]

I think is his speech made it clear that he's digging his.

[00:06:43]

Modi's also said that he's ready to hold talks in the interests of the farmers, but it will be on issues, logic and facts that must be different for him, which is the domain of BJP only.

[00:06:52]

And now that already threatened to launch his last protest for Obama's.

[00:06:58]

Yes, Hoby rides again, but hubby needs an engine and that engine is formed his own party. No, I don't know how the car is going to ride.

[00:07:07]

Parvathy and Siddharta Silver's movie Wertham Myname on Jianyu has been rejected by Regional Censor Board.

[00:07:13]

Yeah, we'd like to discuss it a bit more on this. Karnataka Council deputy chairman sent her. Magadha was found dead near railway tracks. Police suspects it's a case of suicide.

[00:07:21]

They claim that they found a suicide note much earlier this week.

[00:07:26]

We've had a very interesting series by the Indian Express that tracked the lives of both Topo's of the last twenty years to see where they are today. I'll give some details on it when we discuss the story. Yes, we shall discuss this.

[00:07:35]

And some Chinese citizen journalists jailed for four years or one pandemic reporting.

[00:07:40]

And I read about this citizen journalist. If I'm not wrong, it's a she. Yes, it is a she.

[00:07:47]

And she's actually been quite the brave heart and is not the first time in the past she has done many reports of protests against the government and which is why she's been given such a harsh sentence of four years ago. I was like, wow, man. And you know what her reporting was about? Like this time it was about. But it's basically. Yeah, it's about, you know, I mean, she's been an activist in other issues of democracy, but she was also seen on the BBC broadcasts.

[00:08:17]

She was asked that, you know, the way you keep criticising the Communist Party, you can't do that in China and get away with it.

[00:08:23]

I think the more the government will take you from this, I will follow these kind of.

[00:08:31]

And just one more headline, because this occurred even as we just started recording, thousands of farmers have marched to the governor's house in Bihar and Patna.

[00:08:40]

And the EU is kind of making noises, which suggests that it's not quite on this page. Surprising we thought we had.

[00:08:50]

Farmers are very happy. We were told that they don't have the money you which kind of like did we with the PMC.

[00:08:58]

I mean, exactly what did the government which did away with that?

[00:09:01]

So this guy is really taken. If I were anti-gun fan, I would just beat on my head and I say I do not believe has like liquor.

[00:09:08]

And I got to tell you, I feel like that really used to it, considering he's been saying this for five years. But yeah, I mean, this year he played it up so much. And what I mean, I had a feeling he wasn't going to contest for water and diplomatic end to the entire thing. After months and months of people trying to write op ed on what it would mean and trying to analyze what his wheelchair would be and who is he going to hire to be like his right hand man after all, that just comes to an end.

[00:09:37]

So, yeah, all those panels who have you, you're sitting that this is the legacy of MGI.

[00:09:41]

It is not the legacy you see the next Mejía, including the next including the time a lot of, you know, political analyst Unland who used to also do analysis, who was sitting on a panel talking about. So there are two, three as we sit on this on every channel. So that's totally, I think, on the English Channel.

[00:09:59]

Only about 15 hours or two days, and now another letter that he's issued, for those of you who haven't been following the news, he was admitted two or three days ago for high blood pressure to the hospital and discharged later.

[00:10:14]

And his letter saying that that was a sign from God. So then God doesn't want to do something if you have blood pressure.

[00:10:22]

Yeah. This sadly said that, oh, I won't be able to go out onto the streets and campaign. And given that, what is the point of me contesting and so on. It is such a load of nonsense. I mean, what else would I am? There is one interesting thing that I'm seeing now with the election coming up, which is that there are some cracks forming between the BJP and the EDMC, which I mean, it's not surprising, but it's an interesting sort of twist because what's happening is the EDMC has announced its chief minister candidate.

[00:10:48]

Yes. Which is our currency. But the BJP has announced that their party will choose the chief minister candidate for the alliance. And he says no way is that happening. So this has become a very public sort of spat. So they already didn't sort of align on a lot of key issues. So I think this is an interesting thing happened just about three months before we vote.

[00:11:10]

Every journalist also on Twitter. And I feel the need to comment on Rahul Gandhi because of low hanging fruit. Let's let's shit all over him or he's gone to Milan or he's gone on the foundation.

[00:11:20]

The one hundred thirty nine point thirty six Foundation, 36 of Congress is going to let him, which is fine.

[00:11:26]

But I really am wondering from I mean, forget the political perspective on the party and business from a news perspective.

[00:11:35]

Is it eyeholes, disinterest in politics, newsworthy? Can I read some headlines out that came on television?

[00:11:42]

Please do. So this is about a mistake. And Kusanagi late to tepary then news that maybe Kunsan downgrade Milan, then rubick Liaqat Togepi tickets are Rouselle in Milan. This is obviously the same WhatsApp group.

[00:11:58]

And then there's this Asian news Hindi which is saying years younger dude malai konga model good Olonga Fatto Politics Caviling.

[00:12:07]

I think I look at this slightly differently from the media perspective, why they like pick up these stories. Like parties like Aldermen's are said to build this image of the woman. He is useless, don't bother about him. And this feeds into that. There's no alternative to Modi thing. And this happens because like most of these journalists are sort of they have that ideological position where they believe there's no better leader than Moody's and all that. That's one part.

[00:12:34]

But one thing we often sort of tend to overlook is what I call the content of media. So what has happened is because you are in the media, you have a 24/7 news channel, you have an online platform where you have to put up something every ten, fifteen minutes. And social media has only increased that pressure. So you have to put out some put something out and you can't have been farmers protest. It doesn't sell. It doesn't appeal to your audience in their bubble.

[00:13:01]

So you have to create something out of nothing. So this is that.

[00:13:05]

So right now they're asking questions like, why isn't he at the farmers protest if he cares so much? I mean, has Narendra Modi visited the farmers at the border? I don't think so. Isn't that the big question? So the movie's called. But the Manam, which means like, I think it needs new ones, but I'm not really sure. So it starts Parvathy. And I think in Matthew, it's about a Muslim woman from Kerala who goes to JNU to do her PhD or something, where she's researching a Muslim freedom fighter from cattle call Mohamed Abdul Rahman.

[00:13:34]

And that's when the student protests and struggle against the establishment breaks out of JNU. And she's obviously aligned to it politically and she joins the struggle. So this is the basic premise of the movie. So what happened is they applied for permission to enter the regional office of the center board to screen the movie, and it was denied. So according to reports, there were two people on the scene since about panel who opposed it. One of them is the state vice president of the BJP Morcha in Kerala.

[00:14:02]

And he had tweeted and has since deleted the tweet that the movie shows genuine protest and the Muslims being targeted. He opposes it because the cinemas producer and scriptwriter is a Congress member. And he said the premise of the film was decidedly anti national. So now the producer scriptwriter is a Congress guy called O'Riordan Shortcuts as well, was a very senior Congress leader in the state. So at the end of the day, I mean, the issue is his issues with it was that the Congress leaders involved, even though he has a history of working in film in Kerala, and the second is that it's anti national circuit to address the first part.

[00:14:37]

I think anybody can produce a film that should make a difference. I mean, 90 percent, I'm sure, of the films. And some are not produced or supported or written by people who have political affiliations or who are party members. The sense about shouldn't be an arena to settle political scores despite being. The second thing is that the Malayalam film industry in general is like a sort of repudiation of everything. The BJP stands a. It's got prominent actors and producers who are Muslim.

[00:15:03]

It has themes that don't sort of stick to the very Hindu ethos of like Bollywood cinema. So it's slightly inevitable that the BJP would start to come after the Malayalam film industry. But also, this brings about the question of what is this issue of being anti national? It's something that we've been hearing more and more over the last couple of years. So what is I mean, what does it mean when a film is ending? And these are things that have become very commonplace now that people are arrested on the basis of being international.

[00:15:31]

So it's a terrible thing, but there's a lot of public backlash. So they may have to sort of backtrack now.

[00:15:38]

This is the reason I think political films don't get made in India, which is why pop culture is actually a very effective way of informing, you know, a mass audience about political discourse, even even really if it's a one sided political discourse.

[00:15:53]

But even films in Hollywood, which are against the Vietnam War, they get so much of play, you know, films like JFK, there's in Britain, you know, the kind of anti-establishment films that are very political, even if it's pro establishment Yarbro culturally Jaco's don't want to touch it because of shit like this.

[00:16:10]

This is an important point.

[00:16:11]

I mean, like Jeffrey pointed out, the Malayalam cinema is very diverse. You have actors, directors, producers, writers from across the communities and religions. That is not the case in Bollywood. That is why for the longest time, I mean, they have just peddled what nonsense and all that stuff.

[00:16:29]

So should people go abroad if they have opportunities that should I mean, but I don't blame them. I don't judge them for it. But I think what this does is I mean, apart from this, the increased value, I think it does throw up very predominantly the question of cost. You look at all the surname's, they're all very Apricus surnames. And I remember in school we keep learning about things like brain drain and civics and history and all.

[00:16:52]

But what they never really taught us was how it is also a function of cost. Most of the people going abroad were those who could afford it and those who came from those costs. So even now, we're still stuck in that same system where the costs of still doing that are the lower cost cannot.

[00:17:09]

I was reading this sort of research. It's a research paper by the law isn't at all, and it looks at the intergenerational mobility of adults between costs and stuff overwhelmingly, if whatever the overwhelmingly, whatever the cost and the cost, occupation of your parents will likely be your cost occupation. And at most you will go just one step down. If you are seeing the top Karslake or Broman or Chatree will at most go one step down in the professional ladder.

[00:17:41]

Say, for example, if you are like an MBA or you are a government job, you'll go one step down. But for the lower costs, it goes way down. So this intergenerational mobility isn't happening. And the one sort of solution that was thought would work was education. But now you're seeing that the selection happens very early. So you have a problem that now not everybody who backs yoga is a bigot.

[00:18:08]

But this law is clearly bigoted. There is no way to spin it. And if one normalizes this, it is a question of time before you agree to the Trump on you and says, Boss Domagoj, if you're caught even making a call or eating Biriyani at your friend's house on either you will also be in jail.

[00:18:25]

You see, that's the next. I'm telling you the next thing I it is exaggeration. This would be an exaggeration five years ago, but now it's true.

[00:18:33]

No, no. I mean what's happening with the jihad stuff. Newby's a 16 year old taking another 16 year old for pizza is certainly the thrill of jihad.

[00:18:41]

And even if you read the story, was then a report on this from the British, the basically the Hindu, the affiliates basically sang and the song affiliates how they zero in on couples.

[00:18:52]

So they have a proper network from courts. I mean, they have people, lawyers and go to tell them that there's an interfaith marriage happening and the movement is marriage being resisted in Special Marriages Act, the land up there to raise an objection. And then you have to wait for one month anyway. That's what the law says. So it's a railway network of people. I mean, lawyers and courts.

[00:19:11]

Nieblas just praying the security guards at restaurants and fire contact them if they see couples.

[00:19:17]

You know, if there's a Muslim guy, I guess it was the law of, you know, this girl who didn't form this virgin, I think over the past few years, whatever elderly people may be like, the young people really moving towards, I think young people have truly had freedom over the past 17 years in that way in terms of living in together, falling in love, you know, premarital sex or movies showing like young people mingling, kissing and stuff like that.

[00:19:45]

So we were kind of I think for the young Indian at least, we were moving towards a progressive Badakshan. Even if you have your parents that you know what, they were saying something. Exactly.

[00:19:55]

But this kind of takes you back completely. And the police, the state has. Which is scary, you know, you can fight moral policing, I mean, if I want to fight my parents, if I want to fight my neighbors, I still can, you know, it still takes a lot of courage, but with friends, support or whatever, you know, there's still a way to coming around to fighting that.

[00:20:12]

But how do you fight a police? How do you fight fires? I mean, on top of fighting your family? And also have to fight a police that wants you in jail for, you know, falling in love with someone from the other feet. And that's really and it's just going back to the second.

[00:20:26]

But first, I don't think he has to go far at all. I think everyone is perfectly aware of what this law means. They can cover it up by trying to call it something else, but they know where it is. And the fact is that people support it. This is what people want. And I really do think that these are questions that what we're seeing now is a test run for what they plan to bring up, maybe even on a nationwide level.

[00:20:46]

So in 2014, I think people were willing to overlook Ghodrat to elect on this plank of development. I would give them a pass, babe, maybe. I mean, not really, but maybe whatever. And I think a year later, you could still be defended as we voted for development. We're waiting for it now. But now anyone who does support Modi, who support your idea is a bigot anyway.

[00:21:09]

I just think 2020 has been the law of completely bigoted laws. And this is black. This is black and white. I mean, that is especially even the rhetoric that has gone with it. I'm you know, I I'm not so firm on the thing that it was so clear to everybody earlier. While it may be for those of us who follow news as closely as we do, but for, you know, regular people for whom it's justice, they just read a couple of headlines a day.

[00:21:37]

And you'd be surprised if we assume everybody is as well as like many people. You said, have you heard of the speech? They've never heard of it. And because of, you know, how much.

[00:21:45]

But I think this year, the kind of rhetoric one has seen on news platforms, in political speeches, which are for mass consumption and in the law and its wording, I don't think there's any grey anymore. And I think that is why 2020 was significant. Other than Korona.

[00:22:01]

No, I was just saying that on this, people realising or not, I, for one, am not very comfortable calling all Modi models for the models, Modi voters, bigots. I think that's really very simplistic. People vote for so many different reasons.

[00:22:15]

It's really not as and people are very ideological. It's usually the very privileged who can be ideological. And in that privileged, I do think the right wing like, say, Juggy supporting Demonetization, Swapan, Dasgupta, you know, looking over you and love just happens on tangent. You don't want to talk to him on that thing happen supporting what the BJP narrative is. That's bigoted, I think for sure, because these are people who already know, you know, what's happening.

[00:22:40]

They have more means than most people in the country to understand. So I I'd maybe call that bigoted or foolish.

[00:22:47]

I mean, for Juggy to support the demonetization is just ridiculous. But I think for an average voter who voted for Modi in 2019, I think it's too simplistic to say that they're just bigots or they will. They wanted an exclusion of Muslims and that's why they voted for Modi. I mean, that's a separate conversation altogether. And on this, I've had an interesting conversation with my friend over the weekend who's very troubled with her parents bigotry, so to speak, or quote unquote.

[00:23:11]

So she's been trying to, like, brainwash them, school them and, you know, typical like A.J. and you and DCE promote these kind of people. And she said something quite interesting to me that, you know, you know, I'm reaching out to them and I think I'm reaching some point of conversation with them that I'm able to convince them that a lot of what they're seeing is incorrect. And, you know, I know they're not bigots.

[00:23:29]

They didn't raise me to be one. And I think that's something we're forgetting. A lot of these conversations that we hear from our parents and relatives, they didn't raise us to be less.

[00:23:38]

We didn't have these conversations. Logical. Yeah.

[00:23:41]

So I wouldn't have been this if my parents had raised me to hate. And what we forget is that today people are intense victims of mass propaganda from WhatsApp and news. I will never judge anyone today who comes to me and says Geeta Jamad spread koruna because that's what they were born for two weeks. Yeah.

[00:24:00]

And when the truth came out, I was worried about the most uncaught. I really look at people as victims. So what does News Propaganda's doing to that generation is is something that we're seeing.

[00:24:11]

No, I was going to say that. Yeah, I agree that some people I mean, they said certain things through media and they do trust it and so on. But what I mean, I don't quite agree. That was the thing about families didn't bring us up to be bigots. I think what is marvelous is that a lot of people, despite their upbringing, have turned out not to be bigots because we are all brought up to believe certain things in terms of our cost and our religion and our bigotry and so on.

[00:24:35]

And the fact that people turned out differently is a great thing. So that is something that I would applaud way more than that. It was before my reading recommendation.

[00:24:43]

I have a recommendation on how you can change the world in twenty twenty one. Let that be your New Year's resolution, because the world has changed through no action of yours unless you are a super spreader. And by that I mean you are one of the space people who attended.

[00:24:59]

A party like many in Delhi, as it as opposed to watch what the news channels would have us believe. So the world changed in ways with beyond your control. Now you can change the world within your control by paying to keep news free. You see, the biggest change that is happening, at least in the digital space, is the fundamental revenue model for news. And the speed at which it has happened in our country has beaten many experts who used to PELAGEYA and to me about this seven or eight years ago, and I'm so glad to see some of them themselves are asking for subscriptions after telling me how shitty my idea was.

[00:25:33]

So you can change that. And the thousands of newsletter subscribers have done that. And I can confidently say we are more comfortable than those who are depending on ads. And you can change the world.

[00:25:47]

You can change the entire fundamental model of news by recommending to others that day to day to keep news free, because when the public pays, the public is served.

[00:25:57]

So on that note, thank you, everybody.

[00:26:00]

Thank you. Have a wonderful New Year. Twenty twenty one. I hope it is full of hope and good things and we can leave 20-20 behind as a bad memory. All of you listening in the short afternoon.

[00:26:15]

Subscribe listen to the entire Hafter. We will see you again next week with the subtitle and subscribe to keep news free because when the public pays the public servant advertisers pay, advertise are served. Thank you. Goodbye.

[00:26:27]

All the news laundry podcasts are available on Stitcher, iTunes and any other podcast platforms.

[00:26:33]

Please subscribe to News Laundry. Help us keep news independent. Got all our podcasts on news, pop culture, current affairs and sport, visit Newsround dot com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to our YouTube channel.