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You're listening to Comedy Central now. Hey, what's going on, everybody? Welcome to The Daily Social Distancing Show. I'm Trevor Noah. It's Thursday, July 30th, which means we are now just ninety five days away from the general election. So if you're black, you probably want to start waiting in line now anyway on tonight's episode. President Trump casually floats canceling democracy. Michael Costa investigates the smartest poop you'll ever meet. And we'll talk about the life and legacy of Brianna Taylor.

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So let's do this, people.

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Welcome to the daily social distancing show from Trevor's couch in New York City to your couch somewhere in the world. This is the Daily Social Decency Show with children all year.

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Let's kick things off with the bad news, or as it's known these days, the news America surpasses one hundred and fifty thousand deaths.

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The staggering toll with Florida, California and Texas breaking single day death records. The US economy shrank at a thirty two point nine percent annual rate in the April June quarter, the worst quarterly plunge ever.

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The Labor Department says one point four three million Americans filed jobless claims last week. It's the second straight week. New unemployment claims have risen.

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Lawmakers are still at odds over another stimulus bill with added unemployment benefits expiring tomorrow.

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Talks are actually going backwards, not forwards. Two months after Democrats agreed on their plan, Republicans still can't seem to agree on what they want.

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Guys, I don't want to overreact, but I'm starting to worry that Trump's not going to make America great again. And I think I can see what the problem is here, guys. See, the economy is cratering, but the covid deaths are rising. So clearly, what America needs to do here is just switch the titles on these two charts.

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See, now the economy is up and covid is down.

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Everything is fine. You know, one of the most depressing aspects of this situation is how badly the Republicans are blowing it deaths, a mounting job. Losses are rising again. Benefits are running out tomorrow. And they just started to come up with a plan like a few days ago. Like, if your government can't help when things are this bad, then you don't really have a government just paying people to watch the shit along with you. And it's bad enough that millions of unemployed people are about to lose the six hundred dollars a week lifeline that they've been getting.

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But in the meantime, the coronavirus death toll is still rising by a thousand people every day. And while President Trump has done his best to ignore the victims, this morning, the pandemic claimed one of his prominent friends and supporters.

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This just in to CNN.

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Trump ally and former US presidential campaign candidate Herman Cain has died after battling coronavirus and attended President Trump's June 20th rally in Tulsa and recently bragged about the president's Independence Day celebration, writing, quote, Masks will not be mandatory for the event which will be attended by President Trump. People are fed up.

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Look, regardless of what Herman Cain thought about the coronavirus, every loss of life to this disease is tragic.

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And hopefully this will serve as a wake up call to a lot of people who shed Herman Cain's mindset's. I mean, coronavirus doesn't care about your political party. It doesn't care if you like Trump. It doesn't even care if you believe it's real. It is real and it is deadly. So socially distanced whenever you can. And please wear a mask. Hell, you can even wear a mask sarcastically for like, oh, look at me.

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I'm wearing a mask. I'm so much safer now. Yeah, that's fine. Just put it on. So with the economy in crisis mode and deaths continuing to soar, obviously this is all bad for President Trump's re-election hopes. And today, Trump came up with a brilliant new strategy for the election. Just don't have one FOX News alert.

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Some breaking news this hour. A tweet from the White House.

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President Trump tweeting out a short time ago on the upcoming presidential election with universal mail in voting, not absentee voting, which is good, 20 20 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history.

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It will be a great embarrassment to the USA. DeLay the election until people can properly, securely and safely vote.

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Question marks. To be very clear, the president cannot do that. The Constitution is unambiguous about this, that Congress, not a president who may have their own self-interest in mind, gets to decide when the leader of the United States is elected. And to his other point, there is no evidence, of course, of widespread voter fraud through mail and voting, even in states with all mail in votes. That's right.

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Trump isn't actually allowed to delay the election, although not being allowed to do something has never stopped him before. Like we'll still have the election on November 3rd, but he'll probably just add one hundred days to August. I'm sure maybe the court overturns it, but that might not happen until August. Seventy third. And I mean, this is an episode. It's. I know we can't reschedule the election, for starters. Both candidates are like two hundred years old.

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I mean, we've got to keep things moving. I'm not even sure that Trump understands what an alarming proposal this is, because this is basically the move of a dictator. But Trump is just casually throwing it out there in a tweet with a bunch of question marks, like he's on a group text trying to bail on happy hour. Hey, yo, November. There's not great for me.

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Maybe we risk for 20, 21. What do you guys think? And just by the way, you remember a few years ago when I said Trump was an African dictator. You remember that? Yeah. Yeah.

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People acted like I was crazy. But this is how it starts. First, they just suggest that maybe you postpone the election, then they suggest that some of the votes are not valid. And pretty soon they're saying, you know what's really unfair? That there are two political parties where the two political parties let's just have one, then you don't have to worry about making all the decisions anymore. America is made. Oh, and by the way, I mean, if you remember, but three months ago, Joe Biden predicted that Trump would try to delay the election.

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And this is how Trump reacted back then.

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I never even thought of changing the date of the election. Why would I do that? November 3rd? It's a good no no. I look forward to that election. And that was just made up propaganda. Oh, I love me.

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Some fake Trump outrage. How dare you? I won't sink that low for at least three more months.

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And just by the way, November 3rd is a good number. What does that have to do with anything elections aren't decided based on whether the date is a cool number. If it was, every election would be held on June 9th. Nice, but look, regardless of his insane tweets, the chances are that Trump will not be able to move the election, which means he's going to have to come up with a plan to win it the old fashioned way by using racism.

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President Trump is facing scrutiny for his words about affordable housing in the suburbs. He made the comments while discussing the roll back of a housing rule aimed at fighting racial discrimination as Trump works to court white suburban voters.

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There will be no more low income housing forced in to the suburbs I abandoned it, took away and just rescinded the rule.

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The Obama era rule forced local governments that receive federal housing funds to assess patterns of racial housing discrimination and submit plans to eliminate it. On Wednesday, the president tweeted, I am happy to inform all the people living their suburban lifestyle dream that you will no longer be bothered or financially hurt by having low income housing built in your neighborhood. Your housing prices will go up based on the market and crime will go down. Enjoy later in Texas, the president reaffirming that message.

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I've seen conflict for years. It's been hell for suburbia. We rescinded the rule three days ago. So enjoy your life, ladies and gentlemen. Enjoy your life.

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OK, first of all, suburban lifestyle dream sounds like the world's lamest Katy Perry song. But just in case it wasn't clear, Trump is saying that he's going to stop black people from moving into white people's neighborhood. And I mean, it's not even subtle enough to call that a dog whistle. It's too loud. It's more like a dog steel drum.

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I won't let the black people live near you. Put the boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. All right. We have to take a quick break.

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But when we come back, we'll tell you about the full story behind the name Brianna Taylor.

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So stick around. Welcome back to the Daily Social Distancing Show. You know, as the world came together over the past few months to protest against racial injustice, the name George Floyd has been chanted all over the globe. But there's another name which initially didn't get a lot of attention, but has slowly become the rallying call for people crying out for justice and change. And that name is Brianna Taylor.

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Public pressure is now mounting with protests and celebrities speaking out.

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Brianna Taylor's life matters. We have celebrities from Ali Wong, Carrie Washington and Khateeb saying her name.

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Do you know, Brianna, tell a story, her whole story about her family?

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You know, and I want the state of Kentucky to know that we feel for it and we want justice.

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The WNBA dedicating this season to social justice. We are dedicating this season to Brianna Taylor, an outstanding EMT who was murdered over one hundred and thirty days ago for the first time in 20 years.

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Oprah Winfrey is giving up the cover of her own magazine, putting the late Brianna Taylor on it instead.

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Yes, from LeBron James to Oprah Winfrey, Meghan Markle to the WNBA, the tidal wave of support for Brianna Taylor has been swelling day by day.

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And the support has even spread to social media platforms like Instagram and Tick-Tock, which is fantastic. But it's unfortunately also come with downsides, because if you're online a lot, you've probably seen Brianna Taylor being turned into just another meme. You know, whether it's putting her name on a picture of Rihanna's ass or mentioning her death and some caption of a random selfie. And the truth is, this is like this is a weird amalgam of a few things. You have this relatively new phenomenon of using social media to push for justice and reform, which is good.

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But the downside of that, the downside is social media is a medium that doesn't always do sincerity. Well, it doesn't do selflessness. Well, that struggles to give tragedies the gravity that they deserve. And so you have maybe well-intentioned people who want to keep the name trending and they want to see Brianna Taylor get justice, but now essentially using her name as a punch line, because it I'm not the best way to honor someone who has passed means the reason Obama didn't at John Lewis's funeral today.

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And so today on the show, as painful as it is, I wanted to take the time to either remind people or inform people about the story of Brianna Taylor, not as a slogan or a post on your social media feed, but as a human being. Brianna Taylor.

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She's more than just a movement, a hashtag or a moment.

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The 26 year old was an EMT working in emergency rooms at two hospitals and helping respond to the coronavirus outbreak.

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She loved to help people bring on a loved family. She just was she was a very sweet person and she went out of her way for anybody.

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Twenty six and full of life. This is Brianna. Etched in her family's memories. Dancing with friends, let me go as everything on me, all right. Singing her favorite song, buying her dream car.

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She loved life. She loved to be around friends and family. She just she had it figured out.

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That's right. Brianna Keilar was a friend, a daughter, an EMT worker, working to help save people's lives and apparently one hell of a tick tock dancer. And by the way, it's actually nice to see the news covering a black person's death at the hands of police by using the good pictures and of that one picture that makes us all look like we've robbed 50 banks. I mean, you know, Brianna Taylor was a great person because if she had jaywalked once, the news would have been like frequent jaywalker.

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An occasional EMT, Brianna Taylor, was sadly killed by the police. So for twenty six years, Brianna Taylor lived her life to the fullest.

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But then on a random nights out of nowhere, the Louisville Police Department turned her into a statistic on March 13th as Brianna and her boyfriend, Kenny Walker, lay asleep in their bed, plain clothes police officers broke down their door using a battering ram on a no knock drug warrant. Kenny thinking intruders were violently breaking in, grabbed his license gun.

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Walker says they didn't say they were the police before he fired off a shot from a gun.

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The officers responded with a hail of gunfire when the door comes after him to suggest this should happen fast, like was like an explosion.

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Walker said he purposely aimed his gun towards the ground. Sergeant John Madingley was struck in the leg and was one of three officers who returned fire. Detective Brett Hankerson was standing outside and fired 10 rounds through a closed and curtained patio door. According to Louisville's police chief, his blind shooting displayed in extreme indifference to the value of human life. The gunshots whiz through walls, windows, bullet holes were found everywhere in the kitchen, bedrooms in a neighbor's apartment with small children nearby, multiple neighbors called nine one one asking for police, only finding out later it was the police.

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You know, almost every time we hear a story involving a police shooting, I'm always shocked at how badly trained and not in control the police seem. Brianna Taylor's boyfriend was lying in bed, I heard his door get smashed in, grabbed his legal firearm and had the presence of mind to try and injure the intruder by aiming down. But the cops who are supposed to be trained professionals, they burst in like they get paid by the bullets. And for anyone who has the audacity to blame Brianna's boyfriend for shooting up the cops, please answer me this question.

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If America tells people to get a gun to defend themselves from intruders, but the cops are the intruders breaking down the door without knocking, what are you supposed to do to an innocent person?

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There is zero difference between a no knock raid and a home invasion. If someone bust down your door in the middle of the night, you're going to think that they're intruders, not, oh, the cops might be here or damn UBA ites is coming in hot tonight. In fact, it would be weird if you didn't use your gun in that situation. I mean, if not, then what are you saving it for? To be honest, we shouldn't even be calling these things no knock raids, that gives them too much credit.

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We should just drop the euphemism and call it what it is, a home invasion where police get to act like they're in a video game. The police break down the door without warning, they shoot Brianna Talu eight times in her own house. And what makes the story even more tragic is that the cops should never have even been in that house in the first place.

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Police got five warrants approved for war for suspected drug dealers and suspected drug houses. Lumped into that with similar language was the warrant for Brianna Taylor's apartment under the suspicion she was involved with handling money and drugs for an alleged Lewisville drug dealer. Her ex-boyfriend, Jamarcus Glover.

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She hadn't dated Glover in months, a package. Police say they saw Glover picking up at Taylor's apartment was likely a pair of shoes, according to the family attorney. And despite what officers were told before the raid, Brianna Taylor certainly did not live alone. When it was all over, police found no drugs, no money in her apartment before going into Brianna Taylor's home.

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Police were actually warned that she would be very little threat if no threat at all.

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Yes, they used bogus intel and they came in guns blazing, even though they knew she wasn't a threat. Every step of the way this investigation ran, the police screwed up. They made a million mistakes, which is a million more than any black person is ever allowed to make. And honestly, with the amount of mistakes that the police made throughout the entire process, I don't even know if it's fair to call them mistakes at this point because a mistake is something you do by accident.

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But these cops blatantly ignored so many protocols and so much information.

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At some point it moves from a mistake to just actively not giving a fuck.

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And it's bad enough when you learn what these people did in the heat of the moment, but in a way what's even worse is what they did when they had the time to think Brianna Taylor was alive for several minutes after police shot her five times and for more than 20 minutes after Taylor was fatally shot.

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Taylor twenty six lay where she fell in her hallway, receiving no medical attention, according to dispatch logs.

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You see her boyfriend after the shooting being arrested here in the parking lot. Police tried to charge him with attempting to kill police officers, but those charges were later dropped.

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A recently released police incident report from that night is mostly blank. It claims there was no forced entry. It does list Taylor as a victim of a crime and other injuries.

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It says none, even though Taylor was shot eight times.

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You see, it's one thing to, quote, unquote, shoot someone accidentally eight times, but leaving her on the floor without any medical attention, that isn't an accident. That's just a blatant disregard for black life. And on top of all of that, the cops submitted a mostly blank incident report, really, you really couldn't think of anything that you could write on that report? Not even. Oh, we put up these officers are so bad they couldn't even solve the murder that they committed.

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And right now, the attorney general of Kentucky says that they're investigating Brianna Taylor's killing. But it's been four months. And in that four months, they've seemed to find a way to arrest somebody.

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It's been more than four months since twenty six year old EMT Brianna Taylor was shot and killed in her own home. So far, there have been no charges filed against the three white officers involved. By comparison, though, this week it took just one day to file felony charges against more than 80 protesters who went to the home of Kentucky attorney general calling for justice in V.A. killing every single day in America.

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We're reminded that there are different criminal justice systems depending on who you are. There's one for the rich and there's one for the poor. There's one for white people, and there's a different one for black people. And apparently there's also one for those who oppose police brutality and for those who commit. It's not like the one bit of hope that I have seen from this is that the protests are actually getting results because a few months ago, almost nobody had heard of this case.

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But now, thanks to people taking to the streets and relentlessly pushing for justice, some changes are being made, including Briana's law, which bans no knock warrants in Louisville. But the truth is, we have so much more work to do because what happened to Brianna Taylor, it's not just a few bad cops, it's not even really just about the cops. It's also the legislature that gave them the power to break into houses. The judge that signed the warrants, the police department that didn't act against these officers and the county that charged the protesters for challenging these rules.

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In other words, what happened to Brianna Taylor wasn't a failure of the system, it was the system working as its intended. And that is why people are fighting for the system to be changed. We'll be right back. Welcome back to the daily social distancing show. As the race of coronavirus keep rising here in the US, there has been a raging debate about whether or not the official numbers are accurate. Well, Michael Costa investigates a new method for detecting covid that may solve the mystery in this incredibly scientific and mature reports.

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Human excrement, poop doki. It's an important part of the digestive process and difficult to clean out of a wedding tuxedo, but it may just save our lives finding potential hotspots of the coronavirus through sewage.

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It's a method that scientists hope will eventually help us stay safe in the future.

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That's what Bio BA, a tech company started by a few MIT grads, is doing right now to treat this important story with the gravity it deserves. I've decided to not make any juvenile poop jokes I'm going to make to let me make two or three. I get to make three poop jokes in this segment, but that's it. Starting now, so Vilvoorde is based on a very simple concept, everybody pees and poops every day.

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How do you know that? Has has every person you've ever met poop and pee, OK, so it's not a formal study. We know that waste contains a rich source of information on our health and our well-being. Our doctors look at it all the time to understand things that are going on inside your body. But every day we're flushing this information down the toilet. So I thought we're collecting samples at the wastewater treatment facility in our cities.

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You know what this reminds me of? When I take my dog for a walk and he takes a giant load on the sidewalk, typically I'll leave it there. But sometimes I look at it and I say, oh, wow, looks like my dog ate a tennis ball. There's yellow felt everywhere. Maybe we got to take him to the vet. Is that essentially what you're doing?

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But for us, not absolutely. Exactly. In the same way that we can tell a lot about a person by analyzing their gut, we can tell a lot about a community by analyzing sewage. Who came up with this?

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Was it the Germans? They love this kind of stuff.

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So this field, the field of wastewater epidemiology has been around for about a decade or so. But Vilvoorde is the first company in the world that is commercializing this technology.

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So Pope has uses besides leaving an upper decker in the executive bathroom at work. Funny, right? It also contains a wealth of information about any chemicals we consume.

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We designed our first product around understanding the consumption of various different types of opioid drugs, things like cocaine, check, marijuana, ecstasy, methamphetamines, heroin, chuck and nicotine only one.

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I'm doing number two. It helps with the smell. Let's talk about privacy for a moment. Could I opt out of this by shitting in a bucket?

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What's great about sewage is that when we collect a sample, we actually can't tie that back to an individual person.

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OK, that's good for you. Let's talk about covid-19. How did you start testing sewage for that?

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About two months ago, when the scope of the coronavirus outbreak became clear, we developed the methods to actually detect the virus in sewage and also start to quantify it. Some of our initial findings actually showed that in a community in Massachusetts, there were about four hundred and fifty confirmed clinical cases of coronavirus. And yet our samples on that same day suggested that there were up to one hundred thousand cases.

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So Bio Spot launched a national campaign asking cities around the US to send them their poop. At this point, the company is working with waste treatment facilities in forty two states and analyzing the crap of more than 10 percent of the population.

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So every time I take a number two, I'm actually helping the country. It's my civic duty.

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We imagine that this is going to become very critical data in helping governments evaluate when and how to reopen our cities again as America reopens, wastewater testing can tell us in real time if covid cases are increasing and whether it's really safe to go back to normal life, like pooping at the office in a Starbucks bathroom or even on the street between parked cars.

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Damn, I miss that there will be another public health crisis like the one today. And having something like this in place beforehand can really act as an early warning so that we're not blindsided again.

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No, this is a hectic time and we appreciate your expertise, but I actually have to go.

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I have to drop my kids off at the pool. No, no, no. That's not a joke. Stop. I'm serious. My kids have swimming lessons right now, so it's a private pool.

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Thank you so much for that, Michael, so mature. When we come back, I'll be talking to Nadia Murad, a human rights activist who survived being imprisoned by ISIS.

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So stay tuned. Welcome back to the Daily Social Distancing Show. So earlier today, I spoke with Nadia Murad, an Iraqi Yazidi human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner. We talked about how she survived ISIS and her advocacy for all the other survivors of genocide and sexual violence. Nadia Murad, welcome to The Daily Social Distancing Show.

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Thank you so much for having me. And it's nice to be. We do and join you today before we start, I just want to remind your viewers that today is the World Day against human trafficking. And it is our collective responsibility to to end the human trafficking. And I hope everyone can can help to to raise awareness about these these topics.

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You have spoken about this. And and I think that's why your story is so powerful, because many people thought of ISIS and there was a point where it was all that was in the news. And once the larger caliphate was defeated, people thought the story was finished.

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But you you've been an advocate speaking out, saying there are so many women who are still the victims of sex trafficking and sexual violence at the hands of ISIS, at the hands of this Islamic state that's trying to create terror through the abuse of women's bodies. What are some of the things that you think the international community could be doing to help?

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You know, I wish that our our pain and what is happening to us right now after six years of what ISIS did to us, I wish it was gone when when they killed Baghdadi or other us. But this is not the reality. The reality is that we have until today, we have two thousand Yazidi women and children still in captivity. And my sister-in-law, my niece, my nephew, we have more than 85 mass graves in Sinjar right now.

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We have more than 60 percent of the community is displaced. Our homeland is destroyed. And what I can do, not just for one or two days, ISIS, I said, slip behind to a community that will not recover without the support of the international community.

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A year ago, you met with the president of the United States, Donald Trump, and in the Oval Office. And I actually want to show a little clip of that meeting.

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I hope you can call or anything to Iraqi Kurdistan government or ISIS is good. But if I if I now it's Kurdish and Iraqi Iraqi government. If I cannot go to my home and live in a safe place and get my my dignity back, we cannot find a safe place to live. All this happened to me. They killed my mom, my brother. They left behind them. They now they kill them. They are in the mass graves in Sinjar.

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And I'm still fighting just to live in safe. Please do something.

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So you have to explain to him the situation on the ground. Since then, have you heard back or has anything changed or has anything been done to try and remedy what is happening to the Yazidis and especially the women with the U.S. government?

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We have been doing a lot of work. Vice President Mike Pence, he from the beginning, he's a big supporter to our case to to Yazidis to go back. I think one of the most difficult challenges I have faced since the beginning, that my community was not well known to other people, even in the presence around the world. And it was difficult for me to go and explain to them who we are, what happened to us. I think 20 days later, I had to meet them again in France, in the G7, in France.

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And I think they got the message. And this was this was my my work advocating for my community and many other communities around the world to make sure that people will know what happened to us. So they will try to to do something like Yazidis or others will not go through that.

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When we see images of people who are fleeing countries as refugees, oftentimes we are told the story, especially in Western media, that these people want to look for a better life in another country. But you talk about how much pride people have for their homeland, how much people want to go home. Do you think that if the Iraqi government and the international community could come together to fix these regions and rehabilitate what has happened, do you think people will come back?

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You know, I don't think those people that have already make it to Europe or Canada or other places will go back soon because they are seeing other peoples in this place. But when why? I started to focus on my homeland as someone who who was kidnapped. Someone who lived as a refugees displaced is because I knew that no one is ready to to take more refugees and we can they can help us and other other small communities and other countries for people can go back.

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But without support and safety, we cannot go back. I can tell you that I'm not happy to be a refugee after after spending my entire life with my family. You always wanted to stay in your home. And it's not something that I wish to be a refugee. No, it's not. It's not that easy, right? The fact that you faced so many atrocities at the hands of ISIS, you've been through things that no human being could ever imagine going through, and yet you've used it to become an advocate for the change you want to see and you're trying to move the world into a more positive place.

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Where did you find the strength of what keeps you going in a fight that seems so unwinnable, sometimes in hands since the first day you started?

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It's it's not something it's I came from a small community. I a family that we were and we were 11 siblings. My mother raised us by her, like on her own. She was a single mother. It was not easy for her. They came to me, my family, my community, that they raped us. They killed my mother. They killed six of my brothers who left behind them, six widows with twenty one minor children. And like so many other people, many other Yazidi families who are still waiting to to one day talk to see our our family members bury them in a.

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In our homeland, I don't think it's something that I want to do it I am not happy with all these things because I was part of what happened, but I have no other choice. And I guess that's that's the painful truth. You don't have a choice and. I feel like if everyone in the world felt like they didn't have a choice, then hopefully governments would step up and do something about it. And especially on a day like today, hopefully we can stand together and have the right people hear the message that we have to try and fight against sex trafficking and the trafficking of women around the world, no matter where, where or how it's happening.

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Thank you so much for having me. And forgive me for my English was not good. I'm trying to study hard because I finished high school, stay safe and kids were miles from you. Safety and safety of everyone else. Thank you, sir. Thank you so much.

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Thank you again for that, Nadia. Well, that's our show for tonight. But before we go, I just wanted to remind you that America is facing a nationwide poll worker shortage because most poll workers are over 60 and coronaviruses still in the air. Many of them are understandably not showing up.

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But fewer poll workers means fewer polling stations are open. And it also means longer lines that not everybody can afford to stay and waited. But the good news is most people working is paid. And in some states, poll workers can be as young as 16 to join in. Now, I just wanted to say thank you, because over the past few weeks, we've partnered with Power to the Polls to ask all of you to join in, if you can.

[00:34:09]

And over sixty thousand of you have signed up.

[00:34:12]

So thank you to all of you who are giving your time to save your granny and protect democracy.

[00:34:17]

The Daily Show with Criminal Lawyers edition watch The Daily Show weeknights at 11:00, 10:00 Central on Comedy Central and the Comedy Central. Watch full episodes and videos at The Daily Show Dotcom. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to The Daily Show on YouTube for exclusive content and more. This has been a Comedy Central podcast now.