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So Darmody Mam has been a dream guest for me ever since I started this podcast. She's a legendary Ortho's also the wife to the equally legendary founder of Infosys, Mr. Narayan Motty, speaking to her, kind of like speaking to a grand mom figure in my own life.

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She was very calming, very relaxed and extremely relaxed place. Ma'am shared some extremely deep nuggets of wisdom.

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That's what I want to share with you through this episode.

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It left me feeling very, very peaceful, very, very hopeful about the future and speaking about hope. This is a very important moment in the story of the bouillabaisse of steam. We've tied up officially with RADISICH at an international cosmetics. But I'm very proud to announce this partnership. It's founded by another trailblazing woman, Shalini Vonetta. If you want to know more about the RSJ products, please check out the links in the description given below. But for now, I'm going to let you absorb some of that peace and wisdom from Saddam optimum man.

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This broadcast is as special to me as anybody has ever been. I hope you enjoy it and I hope that you absorb everything that this one has to offer. So Darmody man on the radio show.

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Mr. Moody, ma'am, just speaking with you is an honor hosting you on that and the issue is an even bigger honor. Thank you for being L.M.. Thank you very much. You know, usually what I do with podcasts, we kind of warm it up for our guest and then eventually we give them a heavy question with you. Even before this interview started, you made me very, very comfortable. You made me come. So I have to ask you a heavy question right up front.

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I know.

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What is the what is the meaning of life according to you? And I'll tell you why I ask you that, because there's a lot of people my age, there's a lot of people younger than me who are dealing with something called existential issues. We hear a lot of people say, what is the meaning of life, Viveka, working so hard? What is happening? Someone who's had a journey like yourself? I'd love to hear your perspective, ma'am.

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It is like you're defining life is like like blind people identifying the elephant. And someone said it is elephant. Someone say that elephant. Come on, say the Legard elephant. Everybody has their own way of defining life because it is with respect to their experiences. And, you know, they may be sisters, they are sisters, but life for both sisters will be the same. OK, life for husband and wife will not be the same for everybody's.

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Life is a journey and it is a marathon day. That person has to run. It is not the father, mother, husband, wife, children, sister, siblings, nothing it. So my definition of life is entirely left to my experience and highly subjective. You cannot contested like that. How can it be that the way I look at it, the way you look at it is like. That's the way I define what makes a life better or happy, or is the content contentment like the beginning of the day, I get up and say, look, today, let me do some work which is useful to society, which is uplifting me also, which I love little more than normal.

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OK, at the end of the day I said, dude, I achieved what I aimed and if I let you to 80 percent of it, I feel happy and I say I may be rude enough to ask you.

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You don't how do you don't have to use all those adjectives? You can ask this question, OK? Oh yeah. I was sent to the university, so I don't have to be directly. You don't have to be so formal with me directly. You ask.

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I will. I will try my best, ma'am. I'm you know, I'm going to be 100 percent honest. There are certain baugus which I'm just hyped about from the previous day. This is definitely one of those because this is honestly something I visualized for myself. This is a very big day for my career. Let me be very direct with you about the question I was going to ask. What what do you think is Mr. Nahyan Mutis meaning of life?

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I understand your meaning of life. And do you think it's the same? And is that why, you know, you are considered one of the country's most successful relationships, like the have an aligned goal?

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I know that it is hard to tell what is this concept, but I can make out staying with him for 42 years and more than that. Forty three years way. I'm moving him for a long time, maybe fifty years or something, so I can understand for him a life with a passion on on a matter of which he takes and you know, and it was extremely hard of that. Neither to left. Now, tonight, only keeping that as the aim in life and give 100 percent to that and that he believes that creation of wealth is to the nation is very important.

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It is not enjoying wealth or to create that both of us do not consider is important, that it's creating jobs, creating wealth. Bringing people from from lower lower level to a better level is meaning to him. Probably in life it means a lot. He said if somebody has to respect you, then then you should store that quality in you. For example, used tell 40, 50 or 45 years back as it would be. Then we go out abroad.

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People don't respect. They don't in the Western countries they noticed was back. And now we go, oh, you're from India, you have Indian movies on the TV air flight. You get Indian Jewish state and you get so upset, many opportunities. What might happen because India assured Indians showed the capability to respect the sovereignty of other faiths are also there. But we are thoughtful. The people we created software, we sort of often worked very hard.

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We saw that clarity of thought, very good. Then people started expecting to earn respect. You have to work passionately uplifting yourself. That's what he believes because the concept of life possible. Wow.

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OK, I have so many questions about the marriage, the relationship in general, which I will speak your mind about a little later. I have to ask you something more related to yourself. I know you're a movie buff and I also know, you know, the amount of positivity and motivation you put into all your books. So and I'm the same. That's the kind of energy I try putting in my creative work as well. There's always a certain underlying sense of upliftment, of positivity, and movies are a big source of where it comes from, you know, particular kinds of movies.

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So I'm going to ask you from your perspective, is it is it that is that when you watch movies to get a certain sense of perspective or do you just purely enjoy it from the general?

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That is to say, it is not that it's hard to see. I always enjoyed movies because, you know, in childhood I enjoyed to be delighted with the storyline that the fans and, you know, so I think the songs, the tunes, you know, and then, of course, acting and little you know, when I was in this movie that with all movie by the name of the movie Paris, London, it's just so hard to go in.

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At least you can see all those movies later. Part of my life, I've been thinking more analytically. And that is the way I look at the movie, movies are just a three of entertainment. It is much more because it is it affects people, particularly teenagers in rural area, a lot more. And it has to have a place to visit. I always believe in it. You sure something wrong with the script? You know, it maybe for fun and for creativity, but many people pick up those bad habits.

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Do you believe movies and just content in general? Godey's Karma. That's something I believe in karma and not I do not know my work and I always believe that, you know, all the content of the movie should be something nice that would be entertaining and making money and showing which which really affects society is not correct because it has a great influence on other people.

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Got it.

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Can I ask you about the five character building movies of your life, like if you could go back out of all the movies you've flown out of there, how can I say I thought it was a movie earliest movie, but in 1958 I saw Madduwatta. Are the ideas from that day to this day I No. Seventy, fifty eight years old. The last sixty two years I was in so many movies, you know, a lot of the great ones actually according to the legend of the great movie, I don't know what I discovered was a great movie.

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OK, I liked it. OK, what really was a great movie. Hamdallah was a great movie then. I thought it was a great movie which I did my love and I don't know what a great movie or the thought. The list is not fate then. Sad another very poor but it was a great movie. Very nice. But if suddenly the nineteen fifties sixties or fifty nine or something, you know I'm talking at that time then level.

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Yeah it's a nice yeah. It's a really great movie. OK, but we know it's done in India by Brazil with a beautiful movie. Excellent acting. It is. She acted very, very good, very well. We don't have movies. Very good, very inspiring movie and pretty as it does on on the border. What did it mean to me. I was grateful that to say goodbye, I take my other that I suppose which you kept for twenty five years, the same agency.

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You used it fantastically beautiful.

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So you've named all you've named a lot of romantic movies. So that's probably something I've gained from you on so that you are you enjoy your romantic films, but are not only romantic with romance, but what part of it.

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Like that. For example Arazi it is a romance. Is that OK or a movie. A little romance romance. Well, not all the time. You are hot. You did be for some period of your life, but a lot more later. For example, Aradhna is a small romance. It is. There is fantastic romance initially, but later. That's what I'm doing now. It's full of life. OK, so that gives the movies I to enjoy a lot actually.

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So it is not all that I would love to get married. That is not my aim yet. Romance is part of life. But more than that, life is bigger than the ones like.

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Can you elaborate on this thought life is bigger than romance because that's not how a lot of young people look.

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Romance comes when you're young. You realize you'll see all this will be those all available jobs at the job. He'll be OK. I said what you get when you are young, you are not aware what life you think.

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All of you are good parents, good particularly girls or boys. One of your parents take care of your needs, etc. Then you'll be subject to your means of job. You meet. Those are nice. We are that. That is. I just cannot understand Amira Monaca, but I wish God the movies are guy. So when you meet a person in dating time, you met two hours a day or a few hours a week. So you put up your best in that and you make a mistake.

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You know, the boyfriend will forgive you when he makes a mistake. You forgive the moment you are married. Do you together have to face life? And life doesn't show any confession. You are a big mess, a child's life. But the point of this is that no Suwanee confession well, does not show any good decision. Life is quite hard. Hard doesn't mean that you are to struggle to survive in this life. You have to know whether, you know, things may not happen the way you desire, that you plan your dream, it may happen in some other way, you are to face it, accept failures, then you should move on in life.

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Oh, forget it. OK, forget this. Better wanted the best. OK, life, you should go on one life, you can't get stuck in a place and there's a reason after a month you meet your life where you are to live with that person under the table said 24 by seven, and each of us will recognize each other's faults. And then you should learn that you should mature enough to understand that it comes to the package one big anybody else but comes with the baggage wife comes at the back door.

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Nature. His classic book is that it is a package you can't say I want this. I said, what you got too tempting for a wife and you should understand each other's negativity things. It I will accept negative things. I don't expect him to change. I rather accept these negative things and how we can adjust to the negative things and move on in life. That is what I consider. That's a beautiful answer, especially considering the bigger danger you've been on in your life.

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This is a slightly difficult question.

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I'm only asking you this because you're a writer, so you don't maybe I never I wouldn't ask everyone this question, but since you have writing experience, may I ask you, what would you define your life as before, during and after the birth of Infosys in one sentence each.

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So if you had to define it in one sentence, it is not possible because the entire thing, you know, I can explain in one sentence, I can say adventurists, one word adventure, OK, but much more than patience.

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Patience, sacrifice, patience, sacrifice and unconditional love and unconditional love for what?

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For everything, unconditional love for your husband, unconditional love for every mother does unconditional love for children, unconditional love for your company and for your to your children or unconditional love.

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That is the reason at the end of the turn back into the life, I worked hard. I had a lot of patience. I hardly get upset. I hardly get upset. OK, then I have unconditional love and I that's my idea for my life. You know, my very little is known about you from your childhood and your teen is the only thing that's known about you is, you know, that you you got your donation and philanthropic ideals in your childhood.

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But what else do you think went right, according to you, like your to gauge your own childhood and teenage what has gone correct for you. Which has but you know, the older version of yourself, tanks, your parents for all your family for every day do that every day.

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I do that I must attack my grandparents, my mother, father and mother. They were extremely pious people in a village. And my grandfather never went out of Canada, only for some time, five years. And after that he was a schoolteacher. OK, I grew up with him and he taught me many good things in life. And I think most of what I have to do is because of them, like my grandfather told me when I was a young child, you know, he used to call everybody abused a child who was two years old.

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He said nobody was a singular to anybody. It is not correct. You should always respect the other might say, OK, and my father taught me seeking knowledge is very important.

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He taught me a simple way of living and he had only three days to buy more than that and thirty year low for books. He taught me low for proof. My grandfather taught me to be practical in life. She never went to school, but she was very practical. She said how to run the whole school, how compassionate you should be with the people who are hungry. OK, who you should extend yourself somebody the difficulty. So my grandparents, whatever they taught me, I think I'm their product.

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My grandfather taught me even better. Used to drink tea. And what did the milkman did not come for. You had a headache. I asked him why is it look, I'm addicted to take it today. I have to dig deep and know I my day will not start without me. He said, mate, I want to tell you something in life. Never get anything addiction. Don't ever make addiction to tea or coffee, not liquor. Nowadays people bootlicker.

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But is it not for tea and coffee. And to this day, seven days I would never be in my life. I get up in the morning, drink a glass of water.

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That's all am.

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And then I want to thank my parents. My father was a doctor and an artist. He always taught me God is not in the temple. Just don't to God is always the patient. If you help poor people, God is already there. And if you do your work without thinking what your philosophy, your life itself becomes philosophical. Go on helping people, your life, you learn philosophy in helping others, which probably I followed that said that. I said I don't know carmin all those things.

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I know I don't help people and be happy that OK, there. When my mother was a schoolteacher, she also schoolteacher, she said if you have good habits from the beginning, then it becomes easier for you to take it or that you like you have to get up in the morning. How about the note? You should have breakfast, OK then every day to give your lives and then the up afterward. You know, I did for a long time, but I was going to continue to recuperate and then my mother would not spend money without reason unless it is a big reason.

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OK, I'm not a spendthrift at all. So I really want to. Thank my parents, my grandparents and my teacher that that was my teacher and he taught me so that good athletics is the queen of all subjects, please loving others before and which I followed. I think I want to thank many people and a few people of Comac.

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What what what about marriage like, especially early marriage? What do you feel that added to your life, like the way you say that your teacher gave you this, your parents gave you that, your grandparents give you this?

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I'm sure a lot of that isn't given you a husband and wife. Always learn from each other.

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Well, I learned from that. You know, it's not just too much. You should always talk if somebody is listening, otherwise, you know, the guy's a talker and all the friends, but over the period of time, I realized if someone had the knowledge of. Thick and thin, thick and thin is what this is. If you want to achieve anything in life is not the money, it is the passion that that makes you a. And for passion, you require sacrifice, your your sacrifice and people behind you are willing to sacrifice, like the passion made him to build in forces.

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And of course, with the law that similarly I did a lot in philanthropy, would sacrificed a lot for passion along with the family sacrifice can only take you up your debt. I can have the cake and eat it too. You can't do that if you want to. Can you go back to that beginning of enforcers and on a very personal perspective, what was going on in your head when Mr. Nouri Maliki came up to you and said, look, this is the plan, this is what we're going to do?

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What was your first instinct? And did you visualize all this happening? Like, did you have a gut feeling that it would go down this path? No, I never thought I never thought I never dreamt of a company. It is all dream I would leave you. I have to help, my Lord, because he was working hard. He was passionate. And and he wants to do something because an entire community of all nobody did business. So I did not know.

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Fundamentals of business in the ABC. Hmm, but you know what really, I mean, for lack of a better word, brutal earnings like, you know, at the start of this, what were some tough learnings for you?

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A lot, actually. You have small children, family. You don't have money. Your husband travels 200 days here, 250 days in a year than they did in Bangladesh, have no telephones. It was impossible to get telephone in 1985. Then there is no God, OK? The children are not. Well, then I have to manage the small salary. Both children and I was not able to work because the children were very young. So there are many problems and we do not know the future.

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Whether the company will do well or my daughter will remain like this or not live hand-to-mouth living. There are many, many problems. But you know, nothing affected me much because that's okay. That's okay. Let us see after two or three years that. And when did you realize that things are picking up like, you know. Was there any incident after 10, 11 years?

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Well, I mean, was was there any like in that first 10 year period? I'm sure there would have been some of these.

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Would you be open to always a little hiccup thrown only them in business because, you know, I still let the holes in mostly what is left is still a lot of difficulty getting Atlanta. And I know it's not our place as officer to retain office. And that is what everybody has.

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And we are saying, no, no, OK.

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And did you have moments where, you know, you had to, you know, motivate your husband?

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Because that's usually what happens in marriages. And I'll be very honest with you all. One thing at least, kids my age, especially men, might have grown up watching this movie about Spiderman. You know, where Spider-Man is going out. And have you seen the original Spiderman like the first one, you know? And so he's he's going out and saving the world, but the love of his life is coming back. And she she helps him through what?

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She motivates him. So do you think you guys hiring Spider-Man Mary Jane equation back in the day? Yeah, like you said, the things that I do, I do agree, I would agree, I can always work. And, you know, we made our own house actually together mostly, but we built it actually in a minimum money. So I don't think I sold all my shares and bought, you know, other companies that I saved everything and bought a small house.

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I said, we'll do it in free health, OK? And I'm capable of working. You are capable of working somewhere. Why do what? Our requirements are very, very few where they were. Just don't worry about it. Don't worry about children. Will do you know, because I always believe that it is not the money which makes you happy. If the college, which is more important in life, OK, created something which gives you home, which gives the hope of hope and the one which you've got, either way you can do so.

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I always I'm always positive thinking. So I said, OK, why do we wait for two, three years. It doesn't matter. We may not make so much money, but we make enough money to stay in our house and you know, children study. We don't have big dreams of having a bungalow. But I did. My dad bought it, got to give it to us. And we couldn't afford to do what I used to do with it.

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Do you think it's more than enough? Enough, because my expectation in life is very, very small. And that's something I was always happy today.

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You asked me why I don't understand. You know, my the person who married me, should everyone else should have a God. You sure? These days I never had such tics because I always believed if you are happy that you enjoy life, if you are unhappy and you may be mad, but you won't enjoy it, it is not the place, it is not the money. It is the person who is important to you. Enjoy life.

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Do you think that's what's going wrong with this whole generation?

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You know that they got a whole generation, the mental health issues generation. Right. And a lot of people attribute it to social media. A lot of people attribute it to the pace of life now. But what's your opinion on this?

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My hope is I substitute what happens when this generation is they have never shared in life any difficulties, like, well, for children, diabetics. OK, so and my father was only one person. So whatever it is there was to share and sharing became caring. You know, we built up a relationship sharing, room sharing like you felt we were. All four of us has to get OK, so we'll just share. And again, you know, it's this idea.

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It's only my not my health or society won't like that after independence. More in nineteen fifty just after independence that time. The scenario of your children is so different than the scenario. What we have an independent India after seven years. So children have been brought up with a lot of money, a lot more comfort. And listen no there would be one gentleman with two children. Maximum minimum for what I am. Seventy five. So does everybody has a family tree.

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I have a family forest.

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Oh. So if you get lost in the forest. So the whole economic condition of the country was different to the economic capital of the country and the family are different. So we should not say something is wrong with the generation you reflects. What is there in the Western world where the families are born. You are plenty things. Everything is plenty. Then you don't value it. OK, so when you are brought up in prosperity then then the thing makes you happy for us.

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For us going for a holiday once a year. OK, some of it. It was a great thing today. You did it, your children did it daily and then you take them to the Singapore, Malaysia, maybe a little happy that still there. And at the end of the day, maybe they're happy. So every year their expectation in life better is also increased situation increase, affordability increase. So it goes on changing, changing. So this makes them happy and they get to do, you know, or small things happen and things happen.

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Oh, I didn't get that. We owed 150 thirty whatever to get there. It was to get the we are used for rejection, OK? And we also used to share with to enjoy it today. People are scared for rejection. So I really don't know yet what the exorbitant bus shelter for the exemption got. Robust attempts. Is it the liver failure. OK, she wants to commit suicide. No it is they thought was a. Life to law and life offers you many things which you would never expect, including koruna.

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Similarly, in life you have control only on 10 to 15 percent of the events in your life. And that is go on yourself, like you can get up. But how would I be treated? Well, don't smoke, drink and don't make it all in your head. But the events, what happened? A part of that, you know, to you for that, who should go on? Just adjusting and nice to. Yeah, of man, like you said that, like how you keep going to the next days and then you have expectations and when they're not met, you get unhappy because of that.

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And that's probably the core of why all these things are happening. And that's why, you know, we're seeing so much sadness in this whole generation.

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So the question is, on a very daily level, what do you think is one mentalities which that people can apply that, you know, maybe you learned in your 20s? I'd love to know that actually, if you could dial back to your version of yourself in your 20s, what was your daily mentality switch that you were up late?

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Well, when I was in college, OK, I was in college and I didn't go over there, no girls. So I decided I should excel in my education. I thought that neither left nor the right, I consulted on legal studies. Nothing gets once a year.

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That is to take us out of OK after exam after getting a fast track. There are the three after you get the first thing that is there. OK, now you got to fast track everyone that is almost out of the hotel once a year. We look forward for that. OK, look look at the simple way of living. I had three sets of studies and I had to wash them at home really to help my mom in the kitchen some extent and be happy for the college.

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Realized it was you because I don't do well anyway. I used to think thought I may lose the battle, but I'll be the one that does my attitude. And that is also usually my attitude that or if I fail anyway, I thought I lost the battle, but a little more like a basically you always taught positive and you thought long term you'll be fine.

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Like you had that vision.

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Yeah, yeah, yeah. All I think it doesn't matter because I thought I used to look in a different way aside from the Chandra Levy, the big ideas. So something happens when you're wrong. It doesn't matter way that it is. If this is the last day you did the last resort thought and why should I show anybody else than you and I will have that special, you know, I'm happy because I'm good in my work. I'm happy because I'm passionate.

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I'm happy because I love the day you stop long to learn, you become bored. Learning new things every day may give me.

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Ma'am. So it's strange you said that because that was going to be my next question for you anyway. I feel like you're a lifelong learning. I'm the case with lifelong learners who are writers is that they transform all their immediate learnings into books, into content. So you're coming out with a new book right now. Firstly, what's in that book? Secondly, I know it's for children. And thirdly, what are the lessons that you put in it?

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But this is grandparents books of stories. This is a series of grandmothers. That's a story is the second book in the series during a great time when there's a lot of grandchildren come to grandparents house and grandparents help others with time. And along with that, every day they tell a story. The story are about 17 or 18, and every story has some meaning, you know, positive meaning because over time, people are always negative. The stories make things positive.

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So you packaged all your positivity from this phase of your life into those books and into all books. But this book for for sure.

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Yeah, yeah, yeah. OK, have you have you ever had critics come and tell you that maybe you're too positive? Because that's what tends to happen nowadays, especially like even with me, if I'm putting out content that feel good, I have a lot of people saying, no, this is all false, this is fake positivity. But I'm like, no, that's actually how I think I have your face, something like that. No one has stood up to this.

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But is it you know, you do have glass and water have glass. And so I don't think this is a book for children. Actually, it's a book for children.

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It what why why would you tell parents to put is this like what. What you don't get a child loan will tell you why parents would buy.

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Because a lot don't you look at a lot of time and in that time, well actually it's the best time for them to make to read. Needing to get them in the spirit and every thing, there's something related with like how I found out, OK, how the weed was found out. Oh, how important that certain lessons you should how many people in you know, in your life, then you should have a smaller things. For example, you should build a building with many pillars, not one pillar, because emergency required manipulable for all these stories of different types.

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Hilke so entertaining. And also it is useful for children to live a better quality of life. That's what I feel.

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And I feel like it's these children's books.

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It's these Disney movies that come out that really give you very, very important life lessons. But when you're a child, you don't realize what you're learning when you grow up. I feel a big bunch of ethics and morals come from these experiences. So that's probably what you're trying to do, right, at some very heavy.

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I really I don't know. I don't really try. I know I feel like writing. I write and it works. I don't keep an aim and write that.

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OK, ok, got it. Nansel again at this stage of your life for do you think is your evolution like what are you learning at this stage. Because if you're a lifelong learner.

[00:36:33]

Yeah I'm learning more about and I want to talk about books now because writing made me to realize many things that in India were required English writers, because the majority of the metro cities, people go to English medium schools and once they write in English, they'll be translated into all Indian languages, vernacular languages. So I did that.

[00:36:57]

I read books for children, five or six books like, you know, Magic Drum, the Bird, The Golden Wings, Grandmother's Bedtime Stories, then the grandparents. That's all stories. Then single books like A Hope I Didn't Go to Class and Why She Became Salty. OK, these are the kinds of books I write so that children will enjoy it, which is very much in the and an English language. For example, when you take Western English books they write, which is which is they fled their culture related books.

[00:37:35]

They're connected to that northern India where books like that, which is connected to our own culture. But it it is the language in English that we thought that this has made me very happy that children enjoy these books.

[00:37:51]

Mm mm.

[00:37:53]

Do you think the children of today and I'm also talking about myself, I feel like in comparison to an older child, but do you feel every younger generation is very different from yours? I'm sure there are negatives, but what are the positives like? Do you think you know that because of the Internet, because of just having so much information around them, they think differently?

[00:38:13]

Is, of course. Things differently, they do think, because of the information, knowledge with information, they have information.

[00:38:22]

Hmm. But other likes and dislikes, different because you've been writing for a while. So have you seen your end consumers mind change? Like, have you seen your customers?

[00:38:31]

I don't know that. I don't know. Because for me, writing is important after. Right. I don't know. I've not got any feedback that way. But I have received many people telling me that reading that book, researching their children during that, that people have come and told me.

[00:38:49]

But I myself have not a real real but from from all the younger people you meet, like at least this is what I see. Like even I'm twenty seven.

[00:39:02]

And even if I talk to 22 year olds, I feel like it's a whole other generation. If I don't know, 18 year old, it's another whole generation. So I mean, I'm very hopeful about the future of India.

[00:39:12]

But what's your what's your take on it. I'll be going to see maybe one hundred more Infosys style companies. Are we going to go into a very golden time?

[00:39:23]

No, I really do not know, because I don't think that way. I always think what is there today? You see that what is possible to help others do that or you can write it, you can write and convey your ideas to others. And I the book is not easy because children, like a word, also should be very careful what you write and get feedback from them because they always tell the truth compared to a game.

[00:39:53]

So sad on this show we have a section where we actually take questions from our Twitter verse and there's some heavy questions that have come in for you. But feel free to answer them how you want if you want to. Meagan's a short long. It's completely short.

[00:40:10]

OK, cool. We will do that.

[00:40:13]

So the first question is from Yusri Bagga, who's also a YouTube.

[00:40:19]

She has asked a very straight question, which is that did you ever face any kind of relationship problems in all marriages?

[00:40:29]

We did, but you should know how to handle it. There is no marriage without ups and downs.

[00:40:36]

But how what what is the code of handling it like you just stay calm during the situation in order to understand the problem of the others.

[00:40:46]

Put yourself in the shoes and then you're done and then you discuss them.

[00:40:52]

So the next question is, if you had to just in in short, explain how you managed to get a career supporting an entrepreneurial husband and, you know, all your other artistic endeavors, what would you say? What is the goal of that whole process for you?

[00:41:11]

My my parents live downstairs, so they helped me a lot.

[00:41:21]

OK, um, when, uh, when did this realization of giving back to community arise?

[00:41:29]

This is from Westwick. And were any inner battles, you know, throughout that whole process when you made it your goal, did you have any, you know, battles yourself about, OK, how are we going to give back or, you know, on a very personal level what what to do with somebody reads my book about personal duties.

[00:41:47]

But it was a part of my book, one of the book that I described why I started funding for the foundation and the subsequent books was sure the UPS and, you know, the difficult portion of handling people coming to me. There is a there are books that are written the day I stopped drinking milk, three thousand stitches or a and God, they're all books related related to my work.

[00:42:09]

Mm hmm. Like even today. OK, the next question is from Children's Motwani. He does even today. How have you stayed grounded? Like how have you stayed humble through it all? I know you answered it, but maybe you can highlighted again for the question, because I consider myself I'm a very ordinary person.

[00:42:32]

There is nothing great about me and I believe in it. It is not. I'm just talking about it. I believe in it. So there's nothing special. So I'm always got it.

[00:42:42]

OK, this is a beautiful question from Dalia Aswani.

[00:42:45]

She asks that you had interacted with Dr. Abdul Salam as well. What are you spoken to about him? And could you elaborate a little bit on him? Like, you know, what was he like?

[00:42:59]

He was a very simple, passionate man. And we always talked about he always talked about what I said, how to improve our country, Holeproof education, how to motivate and always do that.

[00:43:13]

And and, you know, would you be happy with, like, everything that's happening today in India, like about how, you know, his vision for the youth come true now?

[00:43:25]

I don't know, because I always feel every country realizes that what a problem we should go on. And democracy takes more time. But it is possible to do what we dream big, something I always believe in it.

[00:43:36]

Dervish asks One last question, ma'am. What do you consider a good life?

[00:43:42]

A contented life is always a good life. The person who does not have any regrets in life. OK, I have never done this. I know that that all those things know whatever God has given me that I have done well. I had to my family to help the society and to my country. And that is a contented life that would life recording. Beautiful.

[00:44:06]

I'm usually we this podcast by thanking you and also asking you for three pieces of advice for the younger version of yourself.

[00:44:16]

What would you go back and tell the, you know, twenty year old version of yourself now with everything you've been through?

[00:44:23]

What is the advice you would give? Number one, if I were 20 now, I would have said love, assuming I never lived on one superficial level, one position. And you should let a younger. Oh, no, you're right, it's always so important and I would love to not get into the area again, to get to a second would focus on what you want to. Focus and what you want to do and when you want when are what can be a.

[00:44:57]

It takes longer to the path of success than money. OK, viatical, be be honest viatical, then learn yoga and watch sports. OK, and I read that they will say that even though I don't think twice and most importantly, you know, please understand your parents or somebody who is older than you. Some advice. It is not just an advice. They have undergone a lot of difficulties and learned, which is not good in any book.

[00:45:32]

OK, what did you see? What your parents will encourage the. They will tell you something. Please do this one. And it may not suit you, but at least respect and think or don't think that all people do not have, you know, new ideas. It is not new ideas. They are mature ideas.

[00:45:51]

Amazing. Thank you, ma'am.

[00:45:53]

You have no idea how grateful I am for this conversation. And just thank you for being on the runway show. I will link the book's links down below in the podcast description. And I kind of have a lot of time to.

[00:46:07]

So it means a lot to know.

[00:46:10]

I'm sure people will check it out. And I think children, especially everywhere, do require these kind of inputs, especially when they're stuck at home, away from school, away from the French. Yes, ma'am. Just on behalf of the youth of this nation, like we thank you. You're doing a lot. And, you know, I'm in the process of doing as much as you are. Sometimes you don't some people don't take a step back and realize just how much they're doing.

[00:46:34]

So I just want to pause it for one second for you and just thank you and allow you to continue on this amazing journey on already.

[00:46:41]

Dacula Noisey does a great thing you're talking about in your show and talking about life and books, and I'm sure everybody is enjoying that. Thank you. Bye bye bye.