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[00:00:04]

Some of true crimes, most famous writers remain anonymous. Perhaps it's because they're spelling and grammar leaves something to be desired, or perhaps the content of their work is so disturbing. No one wants credit buy work. Of course we mean what letters claim credit for horrifying murders.

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Today, we're looking at the top ten most disturbing letters from serial killers. Some of these are the sole peak we have inside the killer's head. Others could be hoaxes, distractions that kept authorities from catching the real killer.

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And that's a horrifying crime in itself. But many of these letters hold the hidden clues that can finally put a vicious murderer behind bars.

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Hey, all you weirdo's, welcome to the podcast Original Crime Countdown, I'm Ash, and I'm every week will highlight 10 fascinating stories of history's most engaging and unsettling crimes, all picked by the podcast Research Gods.

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Today, we're counting down the top ten disturbing serial killer letters.

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I personally have never received a serial killer letter, but I've read a lot of them. That's true. Let me say, you can tell a lot about someone by their handwriting. What would you say that your handwriting says about you?

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I write very neat and tiny, so I think it means that I'm very neat and tiny, OK, but I think that's good.

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Mine is like very big and bubbly. So I guess I'm big and bubbly. I love that. Like Barbara Jean, you go where my Reba fans are. That's a deep cut. That's a really deep cut. So if you had to hear in letter form from one serial killer, who would it be? I would have to say, like Edmund Kemper, I feel like because he's such a talker that it could be a lot of letters back and forth.

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You could goss' the Holocaust with that. You know what? My answer would also be, Edmund Kemper, because like you said, he's a Chatty Cathy. He wants to talk. He does. And then also he likes to sound intelligent and like very philosophical. And I just want to hear it.

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You guys would have very witty banter back and forth. I love that. Thank you. You're all appreciate that. But you know what? I'd also want to hear from Ted Bundy, because he probably just has, like, narcissistic ramblings.

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I was expecting you to say that just so I can, like, light it on fire and throw it away. OK, well, I'll do that.

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Well, you know, this list is going to be full of narcissistic ramblings. Sure is. Before we get into that, let me remind you about the fun part here. Elayna has five letters and I have five, but neither of us knows which one the other one has.

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We love it.

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So let's start the countdown. Ten. I'll get us started with number 10, it's the axeman of New Orleans in March 19 19.

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After months of terrorizing the city, an axe murderer sent a letter which was published in the Times-Picayune that said at 12 15 on next Tuesday night he'd spare the lives of everyone playing jazz music.

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He's like, let's party, let's get jazzy. Well, New Orleans complied smartly because they were ready to party. Also, if an ax murderer is telling you, just play some jazz tonight, play some jazz. That's all I have to do. Hit the records. Yeah, they did it. They complied. They played jazz. And no one was attacked to that Tuesday night because everybody was too busy dancing. Yeah, they were too busy dancing.

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But you know what? The attacks that had occurred and did occur afterwards were very xenophobic. Yeah. The targets were often Italian immigrants, which I feel like a lot of people don't know about that case.

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I didn't know initially. I didn't know that. And then we did it on more.

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But I was like, oh, that's crap. Oh, my goodness, that's not cool. So there were many theories about who this axe murderer was and what had actually happened in a common and kind of plausible one includes the Mafia Masons being, quote unquote, the guy.

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Other theories involved the supernatural. And I love these theories. Those are my favorite. Yeah, we love like ridiculous but amazing. Like, people thought he was the devil or maybe the Grim Reaper incarnate, which I love.

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He did write one letter like Signed from Hell or something like that. Yeah, well, Jack the Ripper did from hell, but I think he did like I'm writing this from the bowels or something like that.

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Yeah. Yeah. Something crazy he was talking about. Basically he was a demon from hell. Yeah. He was somewhere that was not earth. Yeah. It was very supernatural so it makes sense.

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Now there were several theories too about what the motivation was, because why are you just axe murdering people, sir, and then pausing to listen to jazz music? Well, obviously it has a tie to jazz.

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I mean, so people were thinking it could be a musician or just a really obsessive jazz fan. I'm going to go with the latter. I feel like that. That's it. You got to be pretty obsessive. I mean, yeah, he wanted to get jazzy and he made people do it.

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Show me your best jazz hands. Yeah, that's a lot to go through to get people to get jazzy.

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So this unfortunately, the murders and his existence completely remain unsolved. Isn't that crazy? I know it's crazy. I want to know who he was.

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Tell us who he was. Tell me. Nine. At number nine is the Unabomber manifesto, in 1995, Ted Kaczynski mailed a 35000 word manifesto to The Washington Post and The New York Times claiming that he would kill again if they didn't publish it. That's a lot of words, many, many words, especially for a manifesto, right?

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That's like a small book.

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That's Isabella I like to remember, like getting in trouble in high school. And they're like 500 words.

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And I was like, really, definitely want to add super like throwing all those bad words on their head up. That the sauce real quick. Seriously? Well, fun fact. Before we get into all the madness, Kazinsky was actually a mathematical genius, so he was adding up those words real quick.

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Such a waste of a brain. It always is. It really is. Well, he entered Harvard at 16 years old, which is bananas, wowsers, like, whoa, you skipped a few grades there, but that's early. But while he was living in a cabin up in Montana, Kazinski had mailed out 16 bombs, mostly to universities and airlines. And this was over a span of 17 years.

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And it's like from a cabin in the woods. Why didn't you just start birdwatching or something or just like hiking snowshoeing?

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Check out some cool lodge cabin in the woods while you're in a cabin in the woods. Great movie.

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I mean, start a rock collection. Do anything other than what you did. Yeah, his manifesto reflected his high intelligence, but it also showed ramblings of a madman and he was detached from reality completely. I feel like that that goes hand in hand a lot.

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Yeah, it definitely does.

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Supreme intelligence and a little bit of a detached from reality. You got a little off your rocker in the middle of it. It's got to stay balanced. And obviously it didn't in this situation for sure.

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Did not.

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Well, this manifestoes message was that technology robbed people of their freedom, which like, I guess you're OK, but sending his manifesto ultimately led to the FBI tracking him down. Dennis Rader, he Dennis Rader that real hard. And luckily, that took away his freedom because after it was published, his brother recognized him as the killer and called the FBI to tournament Wolf. Some bad sibling stuff. We thought our siblings are know that's a real rough. Eight.

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Number eight on our list of disturbing serial killer letters are the Beltway snipers, John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo in October 2002, the two of them left a four page extortion letter for police wrapped in plastic and stuck to a tree outside a Virginia restaurant. It began for you, Mr. Police call me God. That's real intense. It really leads you in. You're like, you know what? I got to know more. I need to know what's inside this letter about why do I have to call you that?

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John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo committed random acts in and around the D.C. area, killing 10 people and they wounded three people. That's awful. And I remember this happening.

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It was so random that everyone was terrified and it was just while people are doing their day to day business.

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Yeah, there was no clear targets. It's just victims were literally going about their everyday activities.

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They were getting gas. They were mowing the lawn by walking around.

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Nobody was safe. It was crazy. So it caused a crazy amount of fear. I would just be like hiding in my house the entire day, terrorizing. It really was.

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And I remember there was all these like fake reports about the different kind of car that they were driving. So people were going crazy looking at white vans and stuff. So the letter that was pinned to the tree openly threatened children, which is like, come on, come on, you don't need to go that far. You can't sink that. Let me do that. Well, it also demanded ten million dollars or the killings. We're going to continue.

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It's a lot of money, a lot of money. Man Lee Boyd Malvo was only 17 years old, so he was a child himself. He definitely was. Yeah. And he was participating right along with this. Muhammad was sentenced to death in the end, and Malvo was only spared because of his age. But of course, he ended up getting several life sentences so he didn't get away from it. Good. There was a new law in Virginia that lets juvenile felons apply for parole after twenty years.

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And Malvo is going to get to take advantage of that.

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He's at least going to be able to apply. Hopefully he will never be paroled.

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I hope not. Me either. Seven. At number seven this week, the mystery letters of Jack the Ripper, they're a mystery because it's up for strong debate regarding the authenticity. And if he wrote them, how many of them were him and how many were accomplices or copycats?

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I really want to believe they were all from him because I loved the from his letter. Yeah, you do like that one. I need to believe you like that one because it's theatrical and we're going to get to do it. There's one letter that I don't want to be from him because it's hilarious.

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Hilarious. But the title. We'll get there. We'll get there. Jack the Ripper, we all know, is infamous because the concept of a serial killer just wasn't widely known at the time.

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And I think it's the unsolved nature of the case that always freaks people out a lot more.

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I think it's also the fact that he literally eviscerated human beings on the street. You know, that'll do it. I think that, like, pushed into infamy a little bit. You know, it has that effect. Well, it he does. There are several murders speculated to be committed by Jack the Ripper, but there's five that are fully attributed or confirmed to be his. So his crimes, like you were just saying, were gruesome and gender driven, obviously.

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Absolutely. He cut out the innards of women, often their uteruses. That's very on the nose.

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I'm like, you had to have been a doctor or like something in the medical field or just some turd being like, I'm going to of out will be lady voice.

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That sounded like it is. I think you're right. He wasn't even British. He didn't even know. He did not even have an axe. It just went away.

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Yeah, well, the letters that have been spoken about most over the years have their own nicknames. You know, the from how letter love it, the dear boss letter. I mean, that one kind of stinks. And the saucy Jackie letter, the sausage. And I think your favorite is the formal letter because it was served alongside with a kidney.

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Yes. There was half a human kidney there, half a human kidney. That is why I love it. No, thank you. That's big. Go big or go home. He went back. He went huge. Yeah.

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Well, analysts found similar linguistic constructs in the sausage, Jacqui and dear bobsledders, which I'm really hoping the sausage ejaculator is not from Jack the Ripper. I kind of hope it's so late. And it's like Zywiec. So saucy, Jackie. Like someone needs to give them a swirly. Yeah, honestly, you're a squid. So Jack would use phrases instead of like saying with hold, he would say to keep back, which is a little weird. I mean.

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Yeah, but some analysts believe that the author of the two letters was not actually Jack the Ripper. I will not believe that because I like it to all connect. I'd be OK if we left the saucy Jackie. Well, no, no, I'm good with it not being there.

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Six. Also on our list of disturbing serial killer letters at number six is one believed to be written by the Golden State killer.

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In 1977, someone believed to be the Golden State killer, a.k.a. the East Area Rapist, sent a letter in poem form to the Sacramento Bee, as well as a local news station and the mayor's office. He, Dennis Rader, do. He did. Or Dennis Rader, actually Golden State killer, because Dennis Rader covid literally everybody, certainly you can imagine.

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So while he was committing the 50 plus rapes that he committed and the 13 murders in the 70s and 80s, he was totally unknown.

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Nobody knew who this guy was. Isn't that so unfathomable? It's crazy.

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It wasn't until 2018 that he was finally identified as the main suspect, Joseph James. D'Angela.

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Do you remember when this happened?

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I remember it was right when we started our podcast. Was in the Golden State. Killer Joseph James D'Angelo was caught due to his relatives DNA being available on a genealogy site.

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And it was like his cousin was like, you know, Susie, I'm going to sign up for 23 and me, I want to find our relatives.

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And then Paul was like, was it worth it? And then he was like, let me work it. And he worked it. Did he he flipped it in reverse it because he had like twenty five family trees going back to the eighteen hundreds to find this guy's DNA.

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I know that's wild. Insane. So prior to the match with the relatives, so before they could actually connect him to this relative, police had the killer's DNA from a crime scene, but they couldn't do anything with it because they had nothing to compare it to.

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So it's just like hanging out with them. Yes. So for years they were just hanging onto this guy's crime scene DNA and they're like, who are you?

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Can we please have a man in Polo's was like, I got this.

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So this letter that we're talking about contained a poem of sorts.

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And it was titled Excitement's Krave Creepy. I remember reading this poem. I do too, Wolf. That's when we became true crime and comedy. Yeah. It allowed us to be. So he would generally call authorities and victims announcing his crimes and he would just hang up like he was that guy. So this letter was weird. It was a plot twist, right? It was definitely a weird thing, but people were like, he must want attention because the letter mentions Jesse James and the son of Sam so annoying.

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And it also had the phrases to make a movie of my life and see you in the press or on TV.

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He just really wanted some attention. He did. He was desperate for attention. Also, picture him sitting down and writing a poem. Just leave that with you for a second.

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We're going to leave that with all of you for a second. You're welcome. So I think the Golden State killer is a highlight of this countdown right now, and the only reason is because of the relevance, because it's real relevant.

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It was very recent within the last week or two that we're recording this podcast that he just had to sit there and say guilty to all of his crimes, which was the best. It was wonderful to see you later. Goodbye.

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But I am actually pretty surprised to see Jack so low on the list. I know I was pretty surprised to see that, too.

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But you're going to see as we go on, it makes sense. Like I got to see how are you going to put jacket number seven? I don't know. Marcus, research guys, what are you doing? What are you doing? Let's see. Let's find out.

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Five. He was mentioned earlier, but now he's got his own letters at number five at Son of Sam during his year long killing spree between 1976 to 1977, David Berkowitz wrote many terrifying letters to the press that were published. And it was a letter he left at one of his crime scenes where he gave himself the nickname Son of Sam.

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This guy, when you give yourself your own nickname, it's like, come on, you're the lamest. You stink.

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Originally, Berkowitz was identified as the 44 caliber killer, which I feel like was a lot better than Son of Sam. Well, I think 44 caliber killer lets you in on what's going on. It's very informative. Here I am. Here's what I'm about. This is it. Son of Sam is like what it's like. I need further explanation. Why don't I know Sam? Well, you know, this guy claimed that Satan had possessed his neighbor, Sam's dog, and then the dog was sending him messages to kill.

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Did you follow that? Yeah, I sure did. A lot of involved players. Absolutely. That makes total sense. It does. So his shooting spree and letters kept New Yorkers afraid of leaving their homes at night for a whole year. That's terrifying. And because his victims were primarily Brunete, women were changing their hair color left and right. Now, you and I had this argument earlier, but I think it was a pretty good time to be a blonde.

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And I'm saying it's always a good time to be a redhead. I mean, I guess, oh, I'm sticking to the blonde on this red hair.

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Well, Berkowitz wrote letters to police detectives and New York Daily News columnist Jimmy Breslin. In fact, he was a big fan of Presidents column, which is like, I'm going to write in to my favorite newspaper. I don't know if these were the letters where he referred to himself, which I think he should have kept this nickname. What, the chubby behemoth. I don't understand why he didn't keep that nickname, because he literally wrote, I am the chubby behemoth that would have been the best serial killer name.

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And that one is the most descriptive. It's the most fitting. I'm like, yes, sir. And I feel like it takes away from the terror of it all, but also adds to it because it's like the chubby behemoth has struck again. And it's like, how do you say that sentence without laughing? You can't. You couldn't. He is a chubby behemoth.

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He sure is. But that's what we'll call him now. We will. Well, the notes that he was writing in were a lot more mocking than outright threatening, but they could be menacing because he sent one in that said he, quote, can't stop killing. That's so like the chubby behemoth.

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Yeah, very chubby behemoth of him. And then another one, he said insinuated that he would strike again on the one year anniversary of his first shooting.

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Yeah, because let's celebrate that. Yeah.

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It's like I don't think we need to commemorate the shooting again.

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Yeah. They never do it whenever they claim they're going to do it, like, yeah. They always, they always dip out on it. It's stupid. Well, after going to prison, he is a born again Christian and now goes by son of hope somehow way lamer than Son of Sam and Chubby Whalum.

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You should have adopted that name in prison. You had the winners right there.

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They were right at your fingertips.

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For. Taking the number four spot is someone else who used the letters to taunt police in the media. It's our favorite. It's Dennis Rader who also gave himself a nickname, BTK.

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Guys, you can't give yourself a nickname. You can't do it. It doesn't work like that. You can't.

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And if you've ever listened to our podcast morbid, you know that I in particular so it's so fitting that I got this one that is fitting.

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I really hate BTK with a passion. He's just the lamest he is. So BTK stands for Bind, Torture, Kill, because that's what he did to his victims when he began killing in the early 1970s. This is the only thing that's kind of crazy about BTK is he remained a family man the entire time he was active in his local church. And this was all while he was committing heinous assaults and murders.

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He clearly had two very different sides to him. Unbelievable. Can you imagine. Yeah. Finding that out about like your cousin or your dad or like any one in your family?

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His daughter wrote a book about it and it's and they didn't know it's crazy. He actually studied administration of justice as a degree, but I didn't know that. Yeah. So he was studying. I mean, a lot of these guys will study how to get away with stuff because it's like how to. Yeah, exactly. It's like getting away with serial killer stuff for dummies.

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No. One, these are the reasons why I think he's the lamest, because he was just so much the water. He was so much he would leave souvenirs from his victims around the city when he was trying to get attention because he was so attention starved. You would leave things like their driver's license, jewelry, even photos of a victim before and after their death.

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That is like the most messed up.

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So he sent 19 letters to newspapers and all. I mean, 19.

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That's an over obsessed ex is what that exact date was.

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When you call and be like, yo, I also like, where did you find the time to be a family man, be active in your church, commit heinous crimes and also write into newspapers about them.

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I really wonder how low the bar was set for him being a family man. Honestly, I really. You do.

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Are you? I don't know if you're stepping up there, but unlike those of Son of Sam B.V. letters, the chubby behemoth, these letters. So Son of Sam did know he could write a letter. Yeah, they were a little insane, but they were well crafted. They were. But not Dennis, Dennis and poor grammar, a lot of misspellings.

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But no matter what, he was always getting to a very chilling point. He would always make sure to scare the crap out of whoever was reading the letter.

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He just did so by spelling everything wrong.

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Well, another crazy thing about Dennis is he just stopped writing for twenty five years. He just he just stopped. He was like writer's block. And then and in 2004, a local paper, The Wichita Eagle, suddenly published a piece posing the question, what happened to BTK? Because everybody was like, what? These serial killers don't just stop.

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Well, people probably seem to be like died or something. Yeah. They're like, you know what? This was a huge story. Where is he? Right. And of course, Dennis.

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Oh, me, little old Dennis me couldn't just sit there and read this because, you know, he saw BTK and he this was an opportunity he got in his finest robe. He sat down, he lit some candles. He got his quill out to write this letter. And he was just like, let's do this.

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This is my time. So he started writing letters again because of that article. And this ended up leading to his arrest in the funniest way imaginable. Best way. And this was in 2005. He sent the newspaper a floppy disk. Right. And he's asked the police ahead of time.

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He was like, can you trace this when you were like and the police were like, oh, no, sir, never course.

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BTK, yes or no. And then I lied like a liar. And so BTK Dennis is like, here you go.

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And they're like, do we found you? Because on that floppy disk, it was connected to the church and it was under Dennis Rader. So, boom, they caught him in 2005. He pleaded guilty and is living the rest of his life in prison. Being Alaimo a true dingess.

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At number three on our list of disturbing serial killer letters is Ottis Toole, who in nineteen eighty eight wrote to the family of perhaps his most well known victim, six year old Adam Walsh, whose father, John Walsh, host of America's Most Wanted.

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Ottis, is gross, disgusting.

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I haven't even brought myself to watch his documentary yet.

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Well, don't do it. He is unreliable not only in his narrative about his life, but also his crimes. He's like a big, fat liar. He's a lying butterface. He is.

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He would offer up all these confessions only to retract them later on and be like, nope, actually, I didn't do any of that. Josquin. It's like, OK, so what did you do? He claims that he is sexually attracted to fire and he was a serial arsonist growing up. So I guess that checks out. He should have a TLC show. Honestly, my strange addiction to fire fire really gets me going.

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He is gay and his partner was Henry Lee Lucas, who was another criminal, very well-known match made in hell. Oh, yeah. Their relationship, no matter how twisted, is very often romanticized.

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Kind of think of like Bonnie and Clyde, except they're both disgusting, real gross. The teeth like who they are on the insides just came out on the outside, not manifested.

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So Tooele abducted and murdered Adam Walsh in 1981.

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And in his letter he tried to extort John Walsh, promising to reveal where Adam's body was for fifty thousand dollars.

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The Adam Walsh case is one of the most horrific cases I've ever read. It's so heartbreaking.

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I don't know how John Walsh does what he does. I don't either. But wow, what a dude good on him.

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Tool then recanted his confession about Adam Walsh's murder twice, not only once, but twice. And charges were never filed against him and they cited lack of evidence. That's so frustrating.

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But he admitted it too tight. And can you imagine being like the family, the parents and hearing a confession? You finally get it's over. And then he's like, no, just kidding. Actually, it wasn't me.

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It's like you are the worst. Truly, there is speculation that Toole and his partner were just scapegoats for the police to settle like all these unsolved murders from the books. And as a direct result of Adam's murder, America's Most Wanted began and helped to capture more than a thousand criminals.

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At least something positive came out of it. I always love when something like really actually good comes out of it.

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In 2008, the case was officially closed and it named Ottis Toole as the culprit, but he had since died in prison.

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I did read that John Walsh is satisfied with autists being the man who killed the sound like you have heard that that's what happened. Yeah. So if John Walsh is satisfied with it, I'm satisfied.

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His word is the word. The word. Ottis Toole seriously horrifies me, and I didn't even think of him being on this list, so I'm so glad he was on this list.

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I feel like now you see why Jack the Ripper was like a little lower back. I can get it. I still want Jack to be a little higher, but I get it, girl. Once we get to number one, you're going to be like, oh, it all makes sense.

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I'm excited now. And BTK is a toolbag, so I'm really glad he was on this list.

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He has to because he's like the letter writer. He truly is 19, not well, but a lot.

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They were there in quantity.

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To. At number two is someone believed to have shot and killed five people in northern California in 1968 and 1969, though he claimed to have killed many more.

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It's the Zodiac killer. We know him.

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Yeah, and I didn't even when I first started thinking of this list, I was not thinking Zodiac, weirdly enough. And he's decipher guys use the letter dude. He's the letter dude, right. With BTK, which is better cipher guy or letter dude. I like cipher guy. Cast your votes. Cast your vote now. Yeah.

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I'd like I'd want to be cyper dude. Did you combine them. No safer dude. Letter guy. Right. I digress either way. So we all know Zodiac loved public attention don't they all. So he loved it. So he'd report his murders and write letters to newspapers just taunting police and the public about them.

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So he was the one reporting them being like, you do this so stupid.

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He also included Clue's cyphers and cryptograms, like I said, cipher guy. And he would lead police to them, but they were never able to decipher the supposin messages. So they were like so intense. So he was like, here, look at this cipher and then you'll find this.

[00:28:28]

And, you know, you know, he was probably bumped him out of your purse. I always wondered if it bummed him out, like he sat there waiting for the big reveal and then he realized he made it too hard. Like if you made a scavenger hunt and you made the clues to heart just way too intense, you're just at the finish line waiting like two days later and you're like, why is no one coming now?

[00:28:46]

Why am I picturing, like Leslie Knope putting together a cipher? Because that happened on an episode. It did Parks and Rec. She made a scavenger hunt and Ben couldn't figure it out. She made the choice, probably pissed she zodiac out. So a young schoolteacher and his wife, though, they cracked the first cipher, no others have been officially solved over the decades. Can you imagine that claim to fame? I am so jealous. We should look at some of the ciphers and I'll give you a lot of support while you figure them out.

[00:29:13]

I love that. You're welcome. I'm ready for that. So he also threatened children in one letter. Whenever they threaten children, I'm like, you've gone too far. I'm done. And that sparked additional security around school buses and schools. And parents were starting to keep their kids home from school, which I would have done.

[00:29:28]

I would like. And this is where we begin, home school. There you go. And I bet that's exactly what he wanted. Again, he's trying to instill fear on everybody. Many theories follow this unsolved case and alternative explanations of the events. Timelines are also up there.

[00:29:43]

Encoded in the letters is a motive where he writes he likes killing people more than hunting wild game because humans are the most dangerous animal. It's like the most dangerous game, dangerous game.

[00:29:55]

I remember reading that when I was like way too young. I didn't even know you read that real creepy look at that. It's real creepy.

[00:30:02]

The encircled cross of the little crosshairs symbol that he sign the letters with that became a sign of terror.

[00:30:08]

I think we said in one of the episodes that that's like the lamest thing ever. I feel like it's very on the nose, like scary.

[00:30:16]

I mean, even BTK tried in one of his letters to make like a cool symbol. Oh, my God, I forgot about that.

[00:30:22]

And I don't know if you guys can tell, but like, Dennis didn't do a good job and it never caught on. He tried, though.

[00:30:28]

He gave it a shot. Another letter came after a period of dormancy and it was threatening more murders.

[00:30:33]

But it's never been confirmed to be from him.

[00:30:36]

So this could have been someone else, a copycat, just trying to get their claim to fame, which I think it was. Fifteen minutes, you know, stupid.

[00:30:57]

One. And that brings us to number one on our list of disturbing serial killer letters is a man known as the Brooklyn Vampire, Albert Fish.

[00:31:11]

Oh, this makes sense. Now, after murdering young Grace Budd in nineteen twenty eight, he sent a letter to Miss Delia Budd describing how he had murdered and eaten her daughter.

[00:31:23]

The most horrific letter ever written in all of ever the galaxy. Albert Fish did have a really horrible childhood. It was full of neglect, beatings and mental health issues. But that's not an excuse.

[00:31:38]

Still, the work still sucks. Still, he started to get super obsessed with pain and he would insert sewing needles into his body. And also he would burn himself with hot irons and pokers. Gross. Yeah. After his fascination for pain and cannibalism grew, he began eating raw meat. Dude, where did that come from? Just have a rare steak and chill out, right? Like you're going to have a much better time, I promise. He became so obsessed with cannibalism at one point that he carried writings about the practice in his pockets.

[00:32:11]

That's overboard, which is like a little different than maybe just like your wallet and some bus tokens in your pocket.

[00:32:16]

Yeah, you know, I don't really know why you need cannibalism writings, but sure, whatever works.

[00:32:21]

So if the information is true, the letter he sent to the Budd family was super, super disturbing and disgustingly graphic and detailed. Oh, it's abhorrent. Yeah, I've read like a portion of it. And then I was like, you know what I'm actually done for today?

[00:32:34]

I read the whole thing because you are who you are. I am who I am. And I regret it because it's really, really terrible.

[00:32:41]

Mess you up, though. Some damage will stay with you. Luckily, though, the police used the information on the stationery paper that he used in his letter, kind of like a BTK flop and arrested him afterwards. Idiot. After he got caught, he confessed super fast and he seemed like super proud to tell his tale to the police and the details of all his plans just punch his face seriously, repetitively.

[00:33:06]

And although nearly everyone, including the jury, decided his fate and agreed that he was insane, he was sentenced to die. Goodbye, Albert. You wouldn't want to be Anasta.

[00:33:16]

I'm always afraid because didn't he used to go and like events and stuff and people's apartments?

[00:33:21]

Oh, did he? I think he did. And I live in an apartment with Venz. Obviously hate that.

[00:33:27]

I always think of it. You know what number one is, number one, I knew when you got there, you were going to get it. We just had to get there, right? I get it, because that letter is truly the word like no other. Yeah. I mean, Jack the Ripper still love his letters because they're kooky and they have kooky names in them. And they came with kidneys. Yes.

[00:34:01]

They were not even close to disturbing like Albert.

[00:34:05]

Right. Right. It's because this is the letters. It's not like the crimes that he did. Yeah, it makes sense. You know, I see. I get my rights. It's fine. Don't argue with the gods. The gods did OK at this time, I guess. Thanks for listening. Remember to follow Crime Countdown on Spotify to get a brand new episode delivered every week.

[00:34:22]

And you can find all episodes of Crime Countdown and all other podcast originals for free on Spotify. Spotify has all your favorite music and podcasts all in one place. They're making it easier to listen to whatever you want to hear for free on your phone, computer or smart speaker. And if you can't get enough of these creepy crimes, check out our After Crime Countdown podcast playlist on Spotify, where we've handpicked even more episodes about this week's stories we think you'll enjoy.

[00:34:51]

And if you like this show, follow that podcast on Facebook and Instagram and app podcast network on Twitter.

[00:34:58]

If you like us, you could give us a follow on Instagram at Morbid Podcast or on Twitter at a morbid podcast by EBI.

[00:35:07]

Crime Countdown was created by Max Cutler and as a podcast studio's original, it is executive produced by Max Cutler, Sound Design by Kevin MacAlpine, produced by Jon Cohen, Jonathan Rateliff and Kristen Acevedo. Crime Countdown starts Ashkali and Elena Erkan.