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[00:00:00]

He weirdo's. I'm Ash and I'm Olena. And this is morbid. It sure is. For some reason, I always pause way too long. I'd like kind of caught that one. But I, like you already noticed. I looked I side. I do like you have to say your name like fuck you think. How many years have we been doing this. And I can't ever.

[00:00:20]

We are a hundred, more than one hundred and fifty five episodes and. Yeah.

[00:00:46]

And actually, this is one hundred and fifty fifth episode. Yeah, but like add in listener tales, spooky roads. Oh yeah I guess. Yes.

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I'll just go back myself. So this is part two of the ash centric extravaganza. That is the Galveston Eleven.

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It is. We're wrapping up with part two today. It's going to be intense. But I just wanted to mention really quick that a couple people were like hailing and you sounded really hoarse about other episode, and I know I did. So I apologize. It's just where I'm not sick or anything. And I think somebody was like, are you possibly having another baby?

[00:01:23]

I was like I was like, if this bitch is pregnant and she didn't tell me or my family. Like, what? I'm not.

[00:01:30]

But I think what is happening is when I don't do well in the heat. No.

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And Massachusetts is having the most Hilter sweltering summer of our lives. I'm so over. Humidity is so heavy. It's like soup.

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And we are in the pod lab, which is not very ventilated. And it's so hot in here and we can't have air conditioning or else you with your air conditioning.

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So we're in this like Adichie area that it's just a thousand degrees. And I think it's it's just drying out my throat.

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I apologize. Hopefully I don't sound like that too much. Do you have asthma, too? Yeah, it's just a whole it's a whole host of thing because I can picture people being like, why is it affecting Aleena, not us.

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I just I don't do well in heat. So I think it's just my body reacts like you don't belong here. I just hate the summer guys. That's all it is. But yeah. Thanks. But I appreciated people like caring that I was hoarse. You OK? They know what's going on. So thank you. I appreciate that. And the other thing we just wanted to touch upon before we then we're just gonna jump right into the episode cause we're ready.

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We mentioned in part one, it came up very organic, just like randomly in the middle.

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And we've been wanting to mention this. We just keep forgetting, too, that John Mark Byers, a key player in the West Memphis Three case, died. Isn't that bananas?

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Yeah, and it's crazy. And he died, like, pretty recently.

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Somewhere around like the 22nd of June. Yeah, it was. It was mid-June. He was only 63. So, like, yes, that's crazy. But he also lived a wild life.

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But he died in a car crash. Oh, he died in a car. Oh, I didn't realize that isn't. Then that's it. That's sad. So John Mark Byers was the stepfather of Christopher Byers is one of the eight year olds that was brutally murdered in that case.

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He was him and his wife or Melissa were very vocal throughout the trial. They were super against Damien, Jason and Jessie. And then later, John Mark Byers flip the script.

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And he was like, would like do it. Well, these boys did not do this. And he was like Terry Hobbs, though.

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He was all of the Terry Hobbs trained. And, you know, I mean but he was definitely on there.

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And he even.

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I mean, there's a there's pictures of like Pam Hobbs and him, like with Damien Echols in the middle, like a so insane Army photo, like him and Damien, like, exchanged letters and apologies to each other.

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That's also like Damien came back angrily.

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It was like maybe he did it. You know what I mean? Like being angry at each other. But they, like, totally buried the hatchet. He became like a total like they didn't do it with the rest of us.

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It was a crazy story, was it was kind of cool to watch, because very rarely do people turn around to be like, you know what, I actually don't think so, especially like grown ass people.

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Usually you're someone who weighs when it's their children, too, for him to turn around and say I was wrong.

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So what happened was he was in a single car crash. Why? Yeah. On Chambers Road near Memphis, Tennessee. And he died of his injuries.

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Oh, that's awful. So that's crazy. I don't want to go.

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We live 63 years and then you go on a random ass car crash. That's awful. And again, when I heard he died, I thought because I know he had mentioned he had like a brain tumor at one point.

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Yeah. Yeah. And like, he had all kinds. He lived, like you said. Oh, a wild life. He lived a life.

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And so I assumed it was something really nice. I literally just found out, like right now that it was a car crash cause I read the other day we were talking about it. I don't think you had realized. And you were like he was only 63. And I was like, well, yeah, but. But an old 60. Exactly. So, yeah, we just wanted to touch upon that.

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That's a crazy thing in the true crime world. So this is such a big figure in that case. And nothing again, no update yet on Naya Rivera that we've seen.

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No, nothing yet. I keep refreshing like Daily Mail and like anything like that.

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She's still presumed drowned with him. Which is really, really sad.

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And I think a lot of people are like, well, let's just hope for a miracle. So still hope and but I don't know. We'll update you as soon as we know.

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And just in case anybody missed it in part one, definitely. Listen to part one before you listen to this. Yeah, but remind everybody what case you're going to do next week.

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We're doing the. A gang case. So I'm going to do that one. So trust me, we're getting on it. We've already. I've already started researching it. We feel like we have enough information now where we can at least put out an episode to a point. You know, what a good. We can always put out an update.

[00:06:01]

Exactly. If need be. Exactly. So let's do this.

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Let's good to Lemi like refresh your memory. I'll do it. So in part one, we went over at Bell's confession letters, the three sets of best friends who went missing and turned up dead, brutally murdered. Yeah, we went over the fact that Larry Dickins was murdered super gruesomely. Hate that story. Hate that story so much. And when we left you off, Ed Bell was like, welp, I'm going to Panama. No big deal, B Yerby, except not real mad at that.

[00:06:36]

Let's dive back in. I'm diving in. So we're diving in with Lisa Olsen. Now, again, I said this is part one. Yep. I think her name is Lisa. Other people call her Lisa on the caller Lisa, because, yeah, I saw both.

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We're just gonna call Ellie. And if you know how to say her name, hit me up. Let me know.

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Do it. Let us learn. So, Lisa, also to learn. To love. To learn. Lisa Olson is the woman we talked about the beginning of part one. She uncovered these confession letters and she went out to speak to Ed Bell on multiple occasions. And if you had. She's a bad bitch. And if you want to see, like, some of their interviews and stuff, I highly, highly, highly recommend. It's an A&E docu series and it's called The Gal Galveston Eleven.

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I love it.

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I can never say that town Galveston is has a river because I want to say. Gavel, gavel ston. Oh, but it's Galva. It's like it feels weird. Yeah. Get. Anyways watch that documentary.

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It's really up to it. It's like seven parts. So she teamed up with the Galveston police detective who is retired, Fred Page, to get more information on the case. Together, they interviewed tons of the victims family members. They interviewed like people who knew Ed Bell back in the day. And like I said, Ed himself. So I told the guys this in part one, Ed claims that he never killed anybody. And it was all the government setting him up to make it look like he was a killer.

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The program, the program, the program and do it. He blames the fact that he's a convicted rapist on the fact that he has an overactive hormone system.

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What, like when you're pregnant? I guess so. I mean, I guess he's pregnant. I mean, I wanted to murder many people when I was pregnant, but I did not do it.

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Never carried it out. Did you do it? He straight up is like, I guess I just have, like, an overactive hormone system. Yeah. I don't think that's it. It's like maybe go to a doctor and get that checked out instead of, like, taking it out on other people. But I will diagnosis. He also says that he never harmed those girls, at least in the documentary. He's like, isn't rape in and of itself pretty harmful?

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And he's like, well, well, yeah, but you know what I mean. No, I don't.

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She literally is like, no, I don't like. But OK. So like I said, in part one, the fact that Ed says he never killed anyone is interesting because if he didn't kill those girls, there is a lot of strong coincidences that tie him to this fucking case. And one of the biggest, I would say, is that all of those killings in Texas and specifically in Galveston stopped when he went to Panama.

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Huh. Crazy wonder how that happened. It's so weird. So we're gonna go back to the killings and talk about the rest of these. Now, these are all single people. Like in the beginning we talked about pairs of best friends were being killed. This is now single people that string single girls. It is.

[00:09:18]

I wonder if it became difficult or if he had some mishaps with the pairs that he was like. You know what? I should just let you have one person. Let's not try to subdue two people at once. I wonder if, like, some shit went awry.

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Probably. I wonder. I would think that's a weird transition. Well, because they always say you're safer in numbers. Yeah. And you in a pair, I think you'd go from one to two instead of two to one. Yeah.

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I think that he's just an idiot and it sucks.

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I think some shit went wrong. I think you might be right. So, Brenda Jones, we're going to talk about her first. She was 14 years old. It was July of 1971 and she went missing. Brenda loved music. It's funny. A lot of these girls love music. Yeah. I feel like the 70s was such a time for good music. Those it's like how could you not? Oh, it definitely was. She also loved teaching Sunday School and she loved Dancing to Soul Train with her sister, Phyllis.

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That is the most wholesome thing I have ever heard. The most wholesome thing. And Phyllis fucking loved her like her and Brenda were. B. F.

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Phyllis and Brenda. So Brenda just seems like the purest soul ever, because what she was doing the day she went missing is she wanted to go visit her aunt who was sick, and she was at the Jenny Seelie Hospital in Galveston. OK. So she asked her mom, she's like, can I go visit auntie? Like in the hospital in her mom's, like, a little hesitant because she had to take a bus to get there. But she's like, OK, like just be home before dark.

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So she's like, yeah, yeah.

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So Brenda does make it to Jenny. Visit her aunt, she has her visit and then she's coming home and she gets on the bus, she gets on the bus home, and the bus driver remembers saying to her, like, get home. It's getting dark. Like, head right back home. And she turned around and she said, oh, yeah, I'm going to I'm just going to stop and grab my sister a Coke.

[00:11:02]

No. And like Phyllis, the purest reason to stop.

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The purest reason to stop. And oh, I feel like with all these cases, like we said, there's always a last person. There's always some kind of survivor's guilt. Phyllis still wonders what would have happened if Brenda just came straight home. I mean, I would, of course.

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That's me. And it's not by any means anyone's fault except the person who did it. But it's just us that completely normal feel instinctually, I would think the same thing. Well, that's just obviously who Brenda was like. She loved to do things for people. I mean, just stopping at my sister who loves her sister. She's a teacher, like a Sunday school teacher, like she just wanted to be around other people and help them.

[00:11:50]

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[00:11:55]

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[00:14:13]

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[00:15:20]

So Brenda's body was the only body to be recovered the same day that she was reported missing. Oh, wow. Which is crazy. They found her body super fast. It was floating in the water near the Pelican Island Bridge. So, again, we have another girl around the same age as these other girls that went missing in Galveston.

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And it's in the bodies in a body of water, which is the worst way. Yeah. And a body worst way to find a body. And it also sucks because a lot of your evidence is gone. Oh, yeah, that's it. I mean, that's got to be washed away. Bodies in the water because it's an easy way to eliminate all the evidence.

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Exactly. So she had been strangled. She was naked from the waist down. And this is kind of like a trigger alert, I guess. Her underwear had been stuffed into her mouth. Oh, yeah. Which she seems to be the only one that that happened to.

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So that's was very aggressive. That's a John Wayne Gacy move. Yeah, it is. She was also tied and bound with laces from her own sandals. Oh, my God. She and Phyllis in the documentary talks about how she loved those sandals. They were like gladiator style sandals. Oh, yeah. And she's I think she saved up her money to get them. Or it was a gift from her mom and her mom didn't like them because they really kind of saucy for the time and kind of spicy.

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But she was like, these are like the best. Oh, that's even worse. And she ends up getting tied and bound with them, her and her wrists. Wow. So that's how she's found. Absolutely terrible. Now, Fred Paige was working with a Galveston police woman named Michelle Sullenberger, and they were able to recover a ton of evidence from this crime scene, including those laces from Brenda's shoes.

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Wow. So in the documentary, you see her her laces and it's like super haunting. You also see the slip that was in her mouth, like, oh, the underwear. It's like undergarment. I wouldn't necessarily say underwear. So the knots were still tied in the laces of her shoes. They were still tied like they had been cut off her body. So you can see where they were tied and they were able to get male DNA off the laces.

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So not all of it had washed away. Wow. What fucking sucks, though, is that there wasn't enough DNA found to make a profile, which if they were able to make a profile, they could have fucking compared it. And I'm sure it would have compared perfectly to Ed Bells. Ed is already in jail for Larry Dickins murder. So they have his shit already. Oh, yeah. And had they been able to get like enough off of these sandals, they totally wouldn't be able to.

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And it's probably just because back then the techniques were not as it's like. Right. And I'm sure it's like the techniques that all the water it had, like every thawing of it.

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Yeah. It's no good. So even though we don't have DNA to connect at Bell in Brenda's murder, the Jenny Sealy Hospital in and of itself is a super strong connection. Okay, so in part one, I mentioned that like anytime Ed was arrested for indecent exposure, rape, all the horrifying shit that he was arrested for, he never served time. Instead, he went and got psychiatric treatment. Oh, yeah. This treatment was always done at the Jenny Seelie Hospital.

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Oh. Which is fucking bananas.

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So that's not only crazy in and of itself. Ed Bell was known even by the hospital to go back to the hospital and pick up girls around that area. Why? So he very well could have seen Brenda leaving absolute maybe like I mean, he must have, like, followed her bus. But still, it's not crazy to think that that's where he saw her. No, absolutely not. It's that for me, I was like, OK. Hello.

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Right there.

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Huge coincidence if it's just a coincidence.

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A lot of these coincidences are huge. So Fred and Paige are trying to figure out. Scuse me, Fred. And try to Fred, Paige and Lisa are trying to find out like anybody that maybe was picked up by him in that area and they stumble across this woman named Susan. Now, Susan at the time was Susan Whiton. But now she's Susan Whiton. Armstrong. I think she got married. OK. And she also changed her name a bunch because I think she had, like, some awful shit happened in her life, which we're going to talk about.

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Oh, good. So Susan was spending time as a patient at Jenny Saley for depression treatment. She was pretty young at the time and she had just gone through a divorce and she was just having, like, a really shitty time. Yeah. So while she was at the hospital, she made friends. And remember, this is the 70s, so I guess you could, like, leave and come back to the hospital, I guess.

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OK. She they decided they were gonna have a party. So she was like, cool, I'm going to go grab some beer. I'll be back. Which I was like. Interesting. Go go for a beer. Run real quick. All right, good. So she goes to go on the beer run and she runs into who? Ed Bell.

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I was going to say good old Ed. Good old Eddie. And she's like, oh, hey, look, can you point me in the direction of, like, yada, yada? And he was like, of course I can. And not only will I point you in the direction, I'll bring you right there.

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I know where. Yada, yada, yada, yada. I think it was it she was asking were like a holiday and was because. Yeah, right near there.

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And so he begins to show her where to go. Walking along with her and then all the fucking sudden he pulls out a gun, holds it to like her chest, and it's like you're not going anywhere.

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Shut the fuck up or I'll shoot you right now.

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Holy shit. So he walks her at gunpoint to his truck. We all remember his stupid fucking truck. He ties her hands and feet. He gags her so that I feel like this is the first time we're seeing the gagging, which then I feel like a little bit correlates to Brenda's slip being shoved in her mouth. Yes. He gags her. He shoves her in the truck and he brings her out to this like completely deserted, desolate construction site.

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I'm horrified.

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And as he's raping her, because he does rape her, he tells her that this is what he does. He does this one to two times a week. He picks up girls, young girls and one to two times a week and rapes them. What the fuck? It's like. And I'm like, why? I don't even have anything to sit like what I feel like. I feel like somebody else did that.

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Who I feel like is like Paul Bernardo or something like you used to tell people like this is what I do, what I do.

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I think you might be right and I think happen. Yeah. Yeah. I feel like somebody else has done that one. It's like a scare tactic because it's like this is what I do. Like, I'm a fuckin professional, so I don't fight back. Exactly. Because it's like an and it's like and once I'm done with you, there's gonna be more after you. Right. So it's putting that in your head, like, by the way, like I'm done with you.

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This isn't over.

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That's just terrifying. Fucked up. So crazily enough, he returns her back to the fucking hospital when all is said and done. And obviously, she like freaking the fuck out and she tells her friend what happened. And then it gets back to the staff and then gets to the police. Yeah. So Ed Bell was arrested for the rape, but never faced charges because he said that Susan was his girlfriend. And like back then, you can't rape your girlfriend.

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Right? Then you couldn't. That was not even now. Yeah. A lot of times it's like, well, well, you're his girlfriends or you're his wife and it's like, know why? So that was that. So like to connection to the Jenny Seelie Hospital connection to, like, the gagging and then like the stuffed underground and Brenda's mouth.

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Weird. Pretty clear to me. Pretty clear. It is interesting to some people. They're like, does Brenda Jones fit because she was his only black victim if she was at home of his. But it's like she was a very young girl at the time. Like, I don't think he cared.

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I mean, and it's like it's one of those things where it's like, yeah, all the literature says that serial killers tend to stay within their race.

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And they also don't usually deviate like they don't go.

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And yeah, it's not usual, but that's not set in stone. It's not like there's not like a rulebook that they all have to open up, like the rules manual and be like whips. I wanted to, but I can't say, all right, I gotta stay in this stupid. So it's quite possible. I think it is. It's strange pathology wise. Sure. But I also think that Ed didn't really have a type. Because if you look at these girls, they're they range pretty far in age from me.

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I mean, they're all under fuckin 16 or scuse me, under 18. But they there's a pretty far age span and like Bernet and yeah, they they don't all look exactly like each other. So I think he just liked young girls. Right. I think if you were a young girl, you were Ed's type. We were there.

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You fit the victim profile, right. Which is awful. Yeah. So. We're going to go to another girl that went missing in 1971. And this is Collette Wilson. OK, so Collette was 13 years old. Her family described her as a social butterfly, a vulva above a butterfly. People loved her. They said that she could talk to anybody, like she could literally just walk in a room and be like, oh, hey, what's up?

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Like, I'd be friends with the person at the end of the conversation. I mean, what if she'll made friends super easy?

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So that summer, Collette really wanted to go to this band camp because she was super good at playing clarinet and she loved playing clarinet.

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I always wanted to play clarinet when I was younger. Did you really did. Huh. But I did not. Oh, well, that's sad. I'm sorry.

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Sad tale in the middle of this, really to zero like way to make people really bummed out. Yeah.

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Well, the issue with this particular camp was that it was like super far and her mom would have had to drive her there and then drive all the way back and then go back to get her and then drive all the way back. Yeah. And Collette was one of 12 children, so her mom was busy. She had some stuff to do. She had a few things to do out the day you things on her plate. But luckily, everything did seem to work out because the band director offered to pick up Collette not super far from her house, so her mom's night would drive her to this little highway junction like on the corner.

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And it was already on the band directors route. So he was like he or she was like, I'll just grab you along the way. Oh, that was nice. So they would meet there in the morning and then he would drive her back here, she would drive her back and Collette's mom would be there to pick her up. Yeah. So one particular day, Collette's mom drives up to the meeting point and she's not there. Neither is the band director.

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And there's just a black car parked there. Huh? Just as at the end of the day. This is the end of the day when she supposed to pick her up, Koshary dropped her off that morning. Nobody's there. Like, literally nobody's there except that black car.

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And she's like, oh, okay. Like, what the fuck is going on? So Collette's body is claimed to have been the first that was located in the Texas killing fields.

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So the Killing Fields name gives me chills every time I hear it, because it's just like the killing.

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It feels like this designated terrifying area. Her body was found just nine days after Maria and Debbie had been discovered. Wow. So that was in November.

[00:26:06]

So she went missing. Klement went missing on June 17th and wasn't found until November when she was a longtime.

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When she was discovered, she was nude and it had it appeared that she had been killed by a gunshot wound to the head.

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So most of these girls either were killed with gunshots or were strangled or it was like hard to determine because they were so decomposed by the time they got to them.

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Also collects clarinet was never found. Oh, I don't know why. I just, like, bums me out so fucking hard. Just so sad.

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That's just such like a yucky. It's really shitty. It's. And so Collette's remains were found. And like I said, in November, near the Addicks Reservoir. So again, a body order, which is weird. Another strange thing in Collette's case is that her remains were found among another girl's bones. And this girl was Gloria Gonzalez. Now, not a lot is known about Gloria Gonzalez's case because her family just like really doesn't like to talk about it anymore.

[00:27:11]

Yeah. And she was 19 years old when she went missing. She worked as a bookkeeper and she was reported missing in October of 19. Ah, yeah. 1971 by her roommate. Oh. And then this is when she was found, Tom. Did I say the last time she was found was seen was outside of her apartment. So that was lost. I'm choosy. OK, so Gloria's cause of death appeared to be blunt force trauma to the head.

[00:27:38]

That's different. Different. Very different. But also weird that she was found among Collette's remains. Because it's like, did this person go back and say, like, did Ed Bell go back and just put somebody else there?

[00:27:49]

Is that just like an easy dumping grounds? Or is it just an easy dumping ground for nobody? Killers have found it. That's the thing. So Gloria is considered one of the 11, but it's strange. Yeah. So like a lot of these victims, Collette had to be identified by dental records. Collette's dentist was her father.

[00:28:10]

So he had to go down and hold his daughter's john his hand and confirm what the fat fork that was her mouth. Holy shit like that, holding your child's mandible in your hand to compare it to your own dental records that you have captured of her horrible Ligue.

[00:28:32]

You might as well just be gut punched over and over and over. Oh, yeah.

[00:28:36]

So just run me over with a semi truck. The sad thing is that when she first went missing, he specifically held onto so much hope. There's one interview in particular where it's her mom and dad sitting there talking and he's like, you know, like all we can do is hope. Like maybe she'll come back one day, like this could all be over. If she just comes back, it'll be okay.

[00:28:56]

And he specifically, like out of all the family members, held on a lot of hope.

[00:29:01]

And he died at the age of 43. And a lot of people say he died of a broken heart, probably. I can't imagine how you ever go on after that. Oh, yeah. I literally I literally cannot fathom that.

[00:29:13]

I thought that was one of the most horrifying things of this whole case.

[00:29:16]

Wow. That's truly, truly horrifying. Like, gut wrenching. So now we have been in 1971 for a while. We're going to fast forward to 1973. So 1973 is the year that Kim Pitchford disappeared. Bell named Kim and one of his confession letters. And he even made note of the black fur jacket that she'd been wearing on the night that she disappeared. I mean, what more do you want? Yeah. What more do you. How is he getting all these details?

[00:29:46]

I don't. How is he like me? He can't just be remembering these details from reading them. No, because you could.

[00:29:53]

He could've easily been like, oh, yeah. And then I killed Maria and Debbie and one of their black jackets was there. Yeah. Like, you wouldn't remember who it belonged to.

[00:30:00]

I feel like you if you only remember who it belonged to because you were there. You saw it on her. Exactly. Yeah. I think he also described her as like the red haired girl and she had red hair. Oh, shit. So Kim was 16 years old and she was super, super excited to get her driver's license, obviously, because what 16 year old isn't. Of course. And she was taking driver's ed classes at Frank Jobby High School, which was in Houston.

[00:30:24]

So usually she would go use a pay phone to let her mom know that she was out of class and her mom would come pick her up. Unfortunately, that night, her mom thinks that she was on the phone when Kim called. And back then there was no call waiting and no, there was no like beep in or anything like that.

[00:30:40]

So she just didn't get the call. Oh, no. And so another one example.

[00:30:46]

These are not what I have to live with that.

[00:30:47]

And it's like you didn't do anything wrong. It's just awful. I have to live with that. I know we've said it like forty five times at this point, but it truly is one of the worst. It's like, how do you how do you know if anything were to happen to you and I was the last person to see you or like you would called me and I missed it even if I didn't know, like who's could ever know?

[00:31:04]

So according to witnesses, Kim got a ride with somebody in a red Volkswagen. And two days later, Kim's body was found again, partially nude in a ditch alongside a rice canal in Alvin, Texas. Wow. So, again, and quick water and really quick. Yeah. Yeah, it was literally two days. I think her driver's ed was on Wednesday and she was found on Friday. Wow. So crazy. She had been strangled. So again, we have another strangulation.

[00:31:31]

Yeah. According to lease, one of this is fucking crazy. One of Kim's friends confided in Lease that in the days and weeks leading up to Kim's murder, they were being followed by a flasher that had been following them from their neighborhood along I-40 five. That was Ed. That was Ed. Ed does that shit I. Forty five as the killing fields. Yeah. Let's talk about some more connections between Ed Kimberly's murder. Let's do it. So, number one, Ed grew up right around the area where Kimberly was found.

[00:32:05]

And this is like. This is not just like, oh, he grew up around the corner from there. Like, that's crazy. This is like middle of fucking nowhere. You wouldn't know that area. Yeah. It would be hard to get in and out of there if you didn't know where you were. Yeah. Number two, Ed worked at a Volkswagen dealership and was known to constantly change cars because remember, he had a white van that ended up there and then he's working on a Volkswagen.

[00:32:29]

Why wouldn't he get a fucking Volkswagen or not? Number three, Ed constantly used the I-40 five, a.k.a. part of, like I just said, the Texas killing fields because he was a traveling salesman at the time. I mean, case closed. And do you remember any part one? Jimmy Summerfield said Ed was always come in and go in. Yeah, because he was a traveling salesman.

[00:32:51]

There you go. Hi. Hello. So the last victim to have gone missing and probably a victim of Ed Bel's was twelve year old Suzanne. Susie Bowers, 12 years old, 12 years old.

[00:33:06]

So this was in May of 1977. But she went missing. She was walking home from her grandparents house to grab her bathing suit and head back over.

[00:33:17]

Awful. Come on.

[00:33:18]

So Susie's mom. When she was like when Susie was super young and Susie was being raised by her dad and her grandparents basically were also helping raise her. And they lived like a couple blocks away from where she was. So this was not like a super long walk that she had to make. It was like not. It was like, oh, yeah. Like, go ahead and I'll be back in like ten minutes. Yeah. Which is just makes me so sad.

[00:33:40]

So when she didn't return back to her grandparents house, her family obviously was becoming super worried because they were like Susie would have never ran away, like all these parents were like a lot of them, I'm sure, were asked, you know, would she have maybe run away? Yeah. And all of these families were like, no, these girls were are not runaways. Yeah. They're just not unhappy at home. They're not unhappy like she's going to get her fuckin bathing suit.

[00:34:02]

Of course, she's excited to go, like, swimming or whatever horse. And then when she didn't turn up at night, they knew that something awful had happened. Susie Susy's remains took two years to find. Wow. Two years. Those poor parents.

[00:34:17]

Her dad and her grandparents. It's like she was found in Alta Loma behind a cattle pin in a deserted area right near a body of water, of course. And there appeared to have been gunshot wounds to her head. But again, twelve year old, it was two years later, so it was a little hard to tell connection to.

[00:34:35]

Ed Bell Ed Bell lived two miles from where Susie's remains were found. Come on in his. OK, now we're going to get into Ed Bell, stupid fucking trailer, which was designed to look like a red caboose. Are you fucking kidding, Red? Fuck it. Like a caboose train. To the lame. Why? That's just dumb. I'm sorry. I'm sorry if you live in a caboose. I'm sure none of you do. But like I said, it's I think it's because it said Bell that I'm so mad about it.

[00:35:04]

Oh. Put that on a shirt. I'm sorry. If you live in a caboose. That's the perfect Doig. That's the slogan for all podcasters right now.

[00:35:13]

It's like, I'm sorry you if you live in a caboose. I don't have a clue. You can cover your f think of even like the most like Nishioka just if you live in the caboose. I'm sorry I offended. That's not what I meant. For dudes. Just because I'm talking about a murderer. So it was widely known that Adbul lived in this fucking caboose with his third wife, who was much younger. Weird. And they lived in the fucking caboose.

[00:35:38]

Did they live in a caboose? Yes. Are you sure? I'm so I'm just fucking hyped about this damn caboose. It was located like, obviously you could move the trailer because it was a trailer.

[00:35:47]

It was the caboose. It was. I don't know if I mentioned that. You didn't. It was found in a lot of precarious spots. This fucking caboose. This is so weird. At one point, it was located just a few miles from where Sharon and Renee's bodies were found. You don't say it was located where Brooks and Jr Georgia were abducted? Like, not super far from there. And also, we're at exposed himself to a girl named Vicky Wrangel and her friend Susan.

[00:36:14]

He's discussed. So let's talk about that.

[00:36:17]

Noah's ark of being a thing, of being disgusting. Just another thing. He apparently knocked on Vicki's door when she and her friend were home alone. He told now this this story, I'm like, what the fuck? So he told them that somebody had just caught a huge fish. You gotta come see it. That's the best. You've got to, like, get your shit done. Like, I know your work. You're a fucking professional at this, but like, wow, big fish.

[00:36:42]

Gotta see it. That's a bold move. Like what? But of course, like.

[00:36:46]

And remember, these are young girls. So like maybe in the 70s if somebody knocked on my door and I was 14, I'd be like, I gotta see this fucking fish.

[00:36:52]

That's that's interesting. So they're like, well, I got to see this fucking fish and I don't blame them. Oh, these poor girl. I'd be excited to see a fish. Yeah, that's the other the well. So they you know, he points them in the direction of where this fucking huge fish was supposed to be. Now that I'm thinking about it, I'm like, yeah, I do want to see a fucking huge fish. Well, and I'm sure he made it seem like this fish was fucking he is a big old fish.

[00:37:19]

I'm just thinking about it and I'm like, I want to see that. Yeah, I've seen huge fish and it's exhilarating. I understand now when I think about it. I mean, like you've ever seen, like a sunfish that she'll change your life. Yeah, I get it. Oh, you ever watch, like, Discovery Channel and you see them out on the boats? It took me a minute, but I got you got it. I'm kind of state of God.

[00:37:39]

You know what? I get it right now, too. Yeah. So he points in the direction of the fish, you know, the big one. And they turn around. They're like, where's the fun? Oh. And he's in the bushes behind them. Nate nude from the waist down, exposing himself and masturbating. Disgusting piece of shit. Disgusting piece of shit. Luckily, they were able to run away. Good. And Vicky's mom was working, like, basically right next door to their house.

[00:38:05]

So they ran right in there and were like, Mom, why go, oh, this poor girl and their young girls? It's like, what the fuck?

[00:38:12]

So that makes me so angry. It makes me angry, too.

[00:38:16]

Ed Bell was identified and arrested. But never fails to face charges because he's like a cat or some shit with nine lives. Damn. And guess what? This happened. This I don't want to call it like an incident, but this assault happened just a few weeks before Georgia and Brooks went missing. In just a few miles away, to me, it's a perfect escalation.

[00:38:41]

He was working in the area. Yeah. And I don't mean like working like his job, but like, I've been he was fucking prowling. He was doing his disgusting shit in that area. Exactly. Yeah.

[00:38:51]

So now we know what we know about Ed when he was living in Texas. And we know that as soon as he left Texas, I said in the beginning, after he murder murdered after he did after he murdered Larry Dickins, he went to fucking Panama and all these killings stopped. But what happened when he was in Panama? What happened? Well, how did also how did you get back here? Who knows? I do.

[00:39:15]

So, Larry, Voucher was a retired investigator who helped officials get to Ed in Panama.

[00:39:23]

Wow. Insane. So because Ed was on the list of most wanted. And he was. Ed was considered to be extremely dangerous. Obviously, if you listen to what he did to Larry. So they did an episode about him on Unsolved Mysteries. Now, somebody mentioned this in the comment, but I really hope that not everybody saw it because fun, fun fact, like, I'm really excited to tell you guys. I was like a somebody said in the comments, he wrote it just I was like, damn it, I'm not mad at you.

[00:39:50]

Fun, fun fact. Matthew Makana, his first TV role was in this episode of Unsolved Mysteries. And while he played Larry Dickens, that's so wild. And I have no idea. I think the person who commented it on our Instagram was like. And that's when I realized that I loved Matthew McConaughey. He was my first boy crush. I get it. I get it, girl. So back to the sadness. So part of the episode is the last known sighting of Ed before he escaped to Panama.

[00:40:17]

Now, that wasn't murdering Larry. He must not have gone to Panama right away, I guess, because this attack happened in September of 1984 in Texas. Wow. So this woman was in her home and all her kids were there. And she's just like getting ready for the day. She was in the bathroom doing our makeup and nastiest. Ed Bell breaks into her fucking house and threatens her with a knife, with her kids over with her kids all there.

[00:40:43]

Now, she did suffer stab wounds. He was, like, able to somewhat attack her, but she was able to, like, overcome this, like, overtake him. And she chased him out of her fucking house with a gun. Fuck you, bad bitch. Alert. I think she, like, actually shot at him, like, while he was driving away. Wow. But he was able to get away. And that's apparently when he was like, I got to go to Panama.

[00:41:04]

So he was in Panama for 14 years. And while he was there, he used the name Cecil Boyd. Boyd, Boyd, Boyd, Boyd.

[00:41:13]

People who knew him or got to know him during that time also called him Wally, which I don't really see the connection.

[00:41:19]

So, Wally. OK. Cecil. Wally. Yeah. All right. I don't really know where that happened, but we're gonna go with it. So when Ed was in Panama. Interestingly enough, there were two disappearances similar to the ones that happened while he was in Texas. So weird. Now, like, there's not a lot known about them because, like, obviously different place. But one girl was a nursing student and the other was a nurse.

[00:41:42]

They were both like much younger girls. And Ed lived right around the area where one of them went missing. And he belonged to a yacht club where the other one was last seen. Huh. Again, he seems to be in a lot of these place.

[00:41:56]

You know, he seems to be in a lot of the wrong places at the wrong time. He has real bad luck, that guy.

[00:42:01]

So while he was living in Panama, he took up looking for gold. Look, I'm not even shitting you like he just became like a gold miner. Is that what that's called, a gold miner?

[00:42:10]

Yeah. I think when you use that little thing, it's like a salute, sir. A solution is loosing for gold. It's like that little thing that I thought you were a kid. No, it like filters out all the stuff and the gold sits on top. I think it's called this loser.

[00:42:22]

All right.

[00:42:22]

While he was on lesson one, random facts that roll around in my brain, I thought it was like, I don't even know what I thought it was.

[00:42:29]

Well, while he was sluicing, he also met his much younger girlfriend, Bernardino Ramirez. Number four, number four. So she was 16 when she met Bell. Oh. And they met because her dad was in the gold business. And Ed was kind of like learning the ropes from him, learned into sloots and learning to be sluicing steady, sluicing.

[00:42:50]

So I'm sure that's the right word. But you keep going.

[00:42:53]

So Bernardino already had a child and she said that she was, like, responsible for all her shit and shit like self-proclaimed. She was a lot more mature than just 16. But still, she was 16. And Ed's yucky. And I don't condone it because I hurt yucky. She also she had no idea about Ed's past. So you can imagine this poor girl's surprise when on February 14th, which is supposed to be really romantic day. Probably for her in nineteen ninety three officers broke into the boat that they were living on and arrested.

[00:43:26]

Ed Bell, she was felt like, well, look like they had been waiting a long time.

[00:43:32]

She never fucking knew what happened to him. Like he was just gone. She never found out what happened until Fred and Fred Paige and Lisa went back to Panama to find her. To see what she knew, what they went out there. And they were like, you know, like we're getting together. All this information, like, told her everything. And she. I believe that she had no idea because she has, like, she starts to cry and she's like, I didn't know that he did that.

[00:43:56]

Like, I mean, we've seen it. Yeah. It's like scene up of BTK went home to his fucking family every night. Yeah.

[00:44:03]

And his poor wife is was just like, please, no one talked to me ever again.

[00:44:07]

Exhaustedly. Shit. Well, Bert Agena was like I hope that, like, he regrets what he did before God. And I hope that like like she was.

[00:44:16]

I don't condone any actions like this guy.

[00:44:19]

So when Ed was extradited back to the US, he was sentenced to 70 years for first degree murder because of the murder of Larry Dickens. Yeah. And then he wrote these confession letters from his jail cell that we were talking about. But like I said, he went back and forth about like 45 million different times about the reasons why he wrote them. He said nothing was true and he just made it up based on what he read in newspapers. And then lease at one point was like, well, like, what about that poem that you wrote, like the 11 that went to heaven?

[00:44:50]

And he goes, that was just a poem. And it's like it was just a was like that was just a poem. A poem. He says a poem. That was just a poem. And it's like, OK, like very specific poem.

[00:45:03]

He probably thought somebody would just be like, OK, I think I honestly think that. All right. And all the interviews that you got, you guys got to go watch the eleven that went to the Galveston Eleven. Yeah. The A&E documentary. So fucking good. You're going to want to punch your fuckin TV screen because he's just so like he like smirks and you know, when, like, somebody is lying and they licks in, they they know that you're pissed, they're pissing you off and they yell at you.

[00:45:29]

Oh yeah. That's what he does to lease like this whole time.

[00:45:31]

And I'm like, I fucking hate you.

[00:45:35]

It's so frustrating. I got to watch it. I know. Do it so personally. Where at the end here. Personally, I think that there's way too many fucking connections to just be pure happenstance. I think Ed Bell did this shit. Oh, I definitely think he did. And right at the end of his life, he was named a suspect and they reopened Maria and Debbie's case. He was named a suspect in their case in twenty seventeen.

[00:45:59]

But then he died in prison not too long after the case got reopened. And he was 82 when he died. What a dick. I'm like, God damn it. Come on. So I'm just like, I'm so frustrated that he's dead now because I think a lot of people would have so many questions answered. Oh, yeah. And I think that if he were convicted in the Maria and Debbie case, it would lead to more convictions. And a lot of these cases.

[00:46:22]

Asked.

[00:46:23]

I think so. It's always sucks when these fuckers die. It does me greatly for Ariel Castro.

[00:46:29]

Oh, that was Hotto Street. Ivan Milat.

[00:46:33]

He's dead. Know, that fucker was just smirking all the way to the end. So he's to look back and just to finish this often with one of his dumb ass quotes. He said, I never killed anybody. The police killed Larry, blamed me about the 11:00. I won't say anything until I'm a free man. Oh. So that in and of itself says to me, you fucking did it. But you're not gonna say anything until you're free because you think that you're, like, not going to be able to put back in jail or some be put back in jail.

[00:47:03]

Well, that's what it's like. So somehow you think that they're just gonna be like, oh, you'll tell us when we let you out. Here you go, sir. Exhaust to open the door and go on your way. It reminds me of Sara attorney and her dad early and how he's like, I'll let you know on my deathbed when nothing can fucking happen to me. That's literally what I was just thinking. We all know that he's guilty.

[00:47:24]

And as soon as you hear that, you you're like, OK, well, you might as you might as well just say, like, yeah, I did it. It's like the O.J. Simpson if I did it right. It's a roundabout way of saying you did it. It was so frustrating to me. Very frustrating.

[00:47:38]

So that is the case of the Galveston elevon. Maria in Debbie's case is still open.

[00:47:43]

Wow. So what I mean is I don't really know how. Because it's like I think you guys have the answer. I think we should get on the case.

[00:47:51]

I think that's I think we should call Fred and I think we should call the become citizen detectives and do this. Let's do it. I think we should do it. I'm right, because this case really frustrated. Yeah, it's really frustrating. And you've got to watch the documentary. I'm definitely going to go. Everybody watch it. Let's all watch it together.

[00:48:07]

I'll watch it together. And then there's so and actually, a lot of the articles that you can find on this are written by Leece herself. Hey, she works for The Chronicle. Good for her. And she's a she's a very.

[00:48:17]

You know what, Olina y. Kind of reminds me of the way that you write. Oh, so I loved reading it. Oh, that just that just made me feel like I'm like that. Genuinely, I love that. I was really good. Oh, I love it. That was very horrifying. Yeah, very traumatizing. Yes. But never go see a fuckin fish. No. No. Belike. I get it. I get it.

[00:48:41]

But don't ever say if somebody knocks on your door. You want to see it be like, well, I don't live near a body of water, so.

[00:48:47]

Nah, no. And even if you do live near a body, you wanted to say, nah, just be like, you know what? I'm going to go on Disney. Plus I'll look at National Geographic and I'll see a big ass fish. There it is. We don't need that. Also, we're not sponsored by them. No, we're not. But like, I just got Disney plus. It's pretty rad. The only reason I got it was see Hamilton.

[00:49:05]

I mean, Hailu.

[00:49:07]

And also, if you haven't watched Hamilton, guys go get Disney for us. Okay. Well, that shit is so good. I love that last episode. I was like, I'm not really a musical girl. Now, this episode you're like, go watch family to watch him. Hamilton is not a musical. It's it is an experience. It's a moment. I'm open. No, I'm totally open to seeing Hamilton and Lynn Manual.

[00:49:26]

Miranda is to me right now the only good thing we have in the world, only like holy.

[00:49:33]

We don't have a lot less completely pure and good and wonderful thing we have. I just want him to be protected at all costs. And I also never want to find out anything bad about him because I just feel like he's just a good person. I think you might be right. You know who else is good people? Wrote Hamilton after reading the book on vacation. Did he really?

[00:49:52]

He literally was on vacation, read a biography about Hamilton and was like, I'm going to do this groundbreaking completely. When you watch you, you're like, how the fuck did you come up with this? So do you like the musical guys? Watch him.

[00:50:08]

He's the Segway there and be like, you know who else is good? People are patriots. And you're like, Butlin, I need to keep talking about women overhand. Well, we will after this. But first, let's take some picture.

[00:50:20]

Let's do it right. Number one, we're gonna think I think your name is Janelle.

[00:50:24]

Janelle, but it's spelled g i n e l l e I like it. And sort of that motorcycle outside wise guy.

[00:50:31]

I don't know if I've mentioned this on several other episodes, but my neighbor got a motorcycle and there it is. You're like nine years ago. It's it's happened many times. Next up is Daniel Carter. Daniel Carter, thank you so much. We then have Darlene Keller sheets, Starlene Keller sheets. Thank you. Sounds like killer sheets. Killer sheets. Well, I would hate if my sheets were killer. I'm going to make that movie. Casey Lee, thank you.

[00:50:54]

Casey Lee, you're the best. Thank you so much. Jamie Richardson, thank you. Jamie Richardson, thank you so much. Destiny Rothenburg. Thank you. Cindi Rothenburg. You're awesome. Thank you so much.

[00:51:05]

This is a really cute name and like, wow, I love your hair color. A Marine mini. Marine mini. That's. You're gonna love her hair color. I mean, just zoom in really quick. I like alliteration.

[00:51:16]

Oh, I love your hair color. Oh, hello. OK. Tell me your secret. Wow. Thank you. Casey Chouinard. Katie. Katie. Katie. Could. Shouldn't Elayna. You don't have a clue. I don't have a C. You lie up. You lie. What is it. Casey.

[00:51:30]

Casey Chouinard. Casey Chouinard. Thank you so much. I like schwa names. Schwa. And I like you. I like you. Michelle Garcia. Michelle Garcia. Glad to see you. Thank you.

[00:51:41]

Trece, Reese Townsend, Patrice Townsend, thank you so much. It is a fun last name. It was very smooth. It is. Oh, an alliteration. Galili Gunning Cabbie Gunning. I love you of that. I love alliteration.

[00:51:54]

Mean it. Danielle Stoddard, Daniel Stoddard, thank you so much. Oh, and her thing is of Harley Quinn. Cool. Oh, that is cool. Yeah. We like you. We do. We love all of you. Danny Gomez Steenland is. I love that, Gomez. You have such a friendly smile. You know what? Let me see. Although I'm like, oh oh oh. I just like closed it out. Like, what a friendly smile.

[00:52:18]

You do very well. I just want to be your friend. Me too, Matt. Are we friends now? We are. And then we have Ashley Warwick.

[00:52:25]

Ashley Warwick. Hello. We love you. Thank you so much. April Rakowski. April Murkowski. That's a cool Essany or Rutkowski Koski. I love a ski. Right. Kind of a name. Yeah. Are you Polish?

[00:52:36]

Thank you so much. I love you. Julie Wooderson. Julie Waterson. What are you doing? Chuckin Wood. Thanks so much. Chiara Gable. Kyar Gable, like a house of Seven Gables in Salem, Massachusetts, or Anne of Green Gables. Like the cartoon book. Yeah.

[00:52:53]

Two very different spectrums of the imagination.

[00:52:56]

But yes, we then have a Madon or Destiny test. So hot right now. Let's finish it off with a Madonna. Let's. Yes. Destiny.

[00:53:06]

You closed it out. Thank you so much to our patriarch. So you guys are rad as fuck. You deserve the world. And we're going to try to give it to you.

[00:53:16]

How did you guys feel about the patriarch? Good. Yes. Oh, I hope you're excited about it. It seemed like everybody was excited about it. Well, anyways, you can follow us on Instagram at Morbid Badcoe hit us up on Twanna. A morbid podcast. Is that motorcycle again? Send us an e-mail. Morbid podcast at G.M. dot com and let me know ways that I can make a motorcycle not work.

[00:53:41]

That's all right. That's all the things said. It's all thing.

[00:53:43]

Okay. Well, we hope you keep listening and we hope you keep it. We heard that somewhere that you like.

[00:53:50]

Do a bunch of really bad shit. Then you disappear to Panama and then you have to, like, make friends with somebody while you're in Panama and like, bad things happen while you're in Panama, too.

[00:53:55]

And then, like, you get Cotliar Panama because you're not that fuckin smart and you go back to Canada and then you all these come to Canada.

[00:54:01]

You don't go to Canada, you know. Oh, you're going to. Where are we from? America.

[00:54:04]

And you get caught and then you don't die in prison if you're up under all these fucking. You have to face it. Face the money. Face the music. That's what it looks like. Bye bye.