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[00:00:20]

What's the answer to. I can't believe you just said that sentence. I'm dealing with no. I've never been here. You've never been here? Oh, no. You were here.

[00:00:36]

I have been here. Yes. Shit. All right. Let's start over.

[00:00:43]

But when I was here, I was here in high school. I'm one of those tours where you go to one country a day in life. Yeah. So just like we were just in France and we got drunk in France. Now we're going to get drunk in Amsterdam. Whose idea was that? You know, my high schools when they were going high schools. Are you guys real stupid? Yes. Your high school? Yeah, we did. Well, I've never been here and I am madly in love with it.

[00:01:14]

I met four cats yesterday. Oh, and each one was cuter than the necks. They're all happy to see me in the beginning. I just got real grabby. That one, it looked like you guys. It looks like you're going to take that first one home. Yeah. Then it was this moment of, like, joy, because we went in, sat down at this outdoor cafe by a canal. It was so beautiful, like this great dress on and we're having a beer.

[00:01:47]

It's like my fucking ideal day. And then this fucking the first cat comes up and we're just like, oh, my God, this is so cool. And then I was gonna, like, try to put it on my lap, but I was scared I was gonna get scratched and everything. Instead, it was like, give me a minute and just jumped on my lap without me asking. I was just in heaven and I was petting it and petting it and petting it.

[00:02:09]

Took so many pictures. Yeah. So many pics. And then it was done. So it bit me and ran away. Which I totally respected. It was like done by goodbye. And now I'd say she has about four days to live.

[00:02:23]

Roughly it was a like meaning's that was used to it or it was like no, no breaking of skin. Yes, that's you. Goodbye. Thank you. Goodbye. But what's funny is when that cat first walked up, it was like the cutest cat you've ever seen. And when that cat bit you and ran, I was like, Cat, that cat was dirty. Suddenly I was like, oh, it's covered in soot. Yeah, wing.

[00:02:47]

I definitely wouldn't have done that if I were home because that could just bring my dirty dress back to the hotel room and put it somewhere. But I wouldn't have brought it home to my house.

[00:02:57]

And what I loved is that I would say about 20 minutes later is like, I'm covered in fleas, please.

[00:03:04]

I had lice. What were you saying? Please, please, please. Yeah. It was really funny. It definitely hopefully she was like full body fleas.

[00:03:11]

I'm like, the cat was on your dress. The fleas never did have enough time to leave that dress area. They're sticking around. Yeah. Speaking of, we had our laundry done. We've been on tour for not very long, but we had our first day off yesterday and oh my God, we smelled so bad. Every our clothes, these dresses, mine. It still does. Oh, right. I can't I couldn't machine wash this dress.

[00:03:37]

Yeah. And I was like, I should just roll the dice and try it because talk about cats. This dress smells like 19 cats panicked and peed all over it. It's not a good smell at all. And but when I collected up all my laundry to get done, I was just like, no, just get the key items that, like, are depressing me the most. I've one sweater that smells so much like yogurt.

[00:04:04]

It's just it was really horrible. And I was like, I'll just power through it.

[00:04:07]

And then, yeah, then we got our laundry done. Then some miraculous find a fucking partner who will go do laundry in a foreign country who doesn't know understand the directions on how to do the laundry. It's just like he's like I they smell clean. I don't know if they're actually clean up. That's all that matters. Is amazing. Yeah. That was the same night we went to sleep. We got there, we got into town, got here.

[00:04:34]

Sorry.

[00:04:34]

And there we have that town that we're all staying in and we got to town. I went to sleep I think immediately. And then I woke up at like eleven thirty like oh no, now I'm hungry. I didn't eat dinner. I don't know what to do. Yeah. So I just walked out of the hotel, started walking around this neighborhood. Walked out. Yeah.

[00:04:55]

And then by myself that night, you know I was like, look, there are all these beautiful canals. What bad thing could happen to me down this side alley.

[00:05:06]

Yeah. The next day when I saw it, I was like, that was a huge mistake. Should not have done that. But eventually I found my way to a McDonald's, of course, cause it's kind of fun, though. I ended in that McDonald's and they have self serve like we don't have these in the stage with just Larrea because no one can be trusted to do anything by themselves. But they have actually big computer boards where you walk up and touch things and order your own food.

[00:05:32]

You're like, yes, we know. I've never seen it before and I don't speak this language even remotely like even slightly. So I was just touching green buttons that seemed like a good idea to touch. And then there is finally one where it came down. I couldn't figure out what to touch. And the only thing that looked right was a red button where I'm like, they can't have done it that like there. That's tricky as fuck if they made it a red button.

[00:06:00]

So I look at oh is not red button though. The order is going to be a red, rarely red. Right.

[00:06:05]

So I looked it up on my phone and the word meant destroy.

[00:06:12]

Like, I should probably just press this button and get back to my hotel room. I think either way you it's true. It's all destruction. Yeah. McDonald's, too. I got it. Oh. So yesterday we were we were riding around. No, we weren't. We were walking around. We were trying to avoid people riding around. I did hit a guy in the leg. And I was just like, oh, like a bicycle or.

[00:06:38]

And I felt like such a fucking asshole.

[00:06:40]

Americans just like, you know. Yeah. And then your camera all out in front. Yeah.

[00:06:46]

Then this guy on a bike who looked like these tall, blond, he looked like he was like a Olympic swimmer. And he was just riding his bike there.

[00:06:56]

Like we all look like that. Pretty standard over here.

[00:07:02]

He has headphones on and I just hit. We hear him as he goes by. I go, I'm going to do it. Here he goes. Push, push, push. Poker face.

[00:07:09]

Poker face does zooms away. It was the most amazing picture. Me riding a bike, though. Like looking Nordic. Boop, boop, boop.

[00:07:17]

Now, when I heard it and I can't remember if that was before or after we had visited a coffee house or whatever they're called, pretty sure it was after a pot cafe. It just sounded to me like book, book, book, book.

[00:07:32]

I was like, that's kind of brave. He's just making sounds on his bike. Maybe that's a thing they do here. We'll have to learn about it later. And Georgia turns to me and goes, fucking Lady Gaga.

[00:07:43]

He was like, that's rad.

[00:07:46]

It was this moment of like, I feel like stone gods, you know, because like, when I smoke pot are really fucking paranoid usually and, like, kind of screwed up and like, I'm not good at it. But I was doing the day and I was in Amsterdam. It's like I'm going to do this. And it was just this moment, I think we had just walked out of the cafe and it was like, God doing what?

[00:08:02]

Here you go. It's going to be a good one. It was the right thing to do. I pop pop punk book or phase two.

[00:08:09]

God was like, I'm going to make this funny for you. You're gonna you're gonna love it. I was smoking pot in that way or I was just like this. I'm expecting to have happen to me what happens to most of my American friends that come here. And they're like, oh, man, I went to Hamsterdam and eat this thing someone gave me. And then I had a nervous breakdown in my hotel room and I was in the fetal position for four days.

[00:08:34]

The second we started smoking pot, I was like, this could go very badly for one or all of us, but let's just do it and see what happens. Yeah. And instead, it was fucking delightful. And perfect all day long because we didn't eat anything. Strangers hand. Oh, no, that's right. We did eat a meatball sandwich. Oh that's true. Someone gave up but we were in a restaurant and they didn't just hand it to the poker face guy rides by.

[00:08:58]

He's like poker face. Eat this. I'm already swallowing it. Before you guys were like, you shouldn't. Oh, I don't eat magic meatball sandwich. That's a bad idea. I know also I bet those like we walked through the like the market area where there was like every. It's so smart. It's just like have a pot cafe here. And then just set up a stand of bullshit. And everyone's gonna come out, be like, oh, it's this necklace.

[00:09:28]

It reminds me of my mother. How many do you want? Nineteen. OK, I mean English. I almost got a fucking menorah. A barely Jewish like. I don't know. I don't like the candles at Hanukkah. But you're like it's meaningful. This isn't a menorah. It's symbolic of my experience here. And then you get home and it's just a candelabra.

[00:09:55]

I was so stunned. I thought something was Jewish symbolism. And it's not. I was seeing double. There was only for our kids.

[00:10:05]

But you did buy a necklace. I did. But I bought it. I bought a necklace that reminded me of a necklace my mom used to wear until I got home. And I was like, this is nothing like that at all. And I bought it at the first stand I saw at which it cost eight. And then I saw it incrementally as you walked. It was like six fifty five fuckin three fifty. I was just like, fine.

[00:10:30]

What did I buy? And the last one, they're like, please take this. Just please. Yes. They're like, we're giving these necklaces away. Oh, I did also. I bought what I thought was a pot lollipop at one of those stands.

[00:10:42]

And we were both mints. And I was like, oh, be careful.

[00:10:46]

But it was just a lollipop like I got.

[00:10:50]

Well, it was just green. I wish I had video like timelapse video of me eating this lollipop because I was like doing stuff on my laptop and I would like take it and I would have it in my mouth and I would like literally time it out of like five minutes. Now put it down. Careful now. Wait 20 minutes. Now see. OK. Now five more minutes. Because I was not going to be the one that was like wandering the streets with my shirt off.

[00:11:16]

Vincent, I hear a knock at our eyes.

[00:11:18]

I'm crying. Can I sleep with you? I'm scared. So it was like I was like dosing myself, like I was in a hospital, like just fucking like taking my own pulse. I got to the fucking center. There was gum. I was like, this was not a pop lollipop in any fucking way. I just paid five bucks for candy.

[00:11:42]

Oh, for a lollipop buyer or just a plain old lollipop at the market, you idiot. You buy just a lollipop.

[00:11:50]

Not here, but it wasn't his fault.

[00:11:53]

Don't on whose. No. My cats are going to take care of themselves. And they're also if he wasn't there, then Elvis wouldn't have had anyone's laptop to barf on today. Not fucking kidding. Guess who has to buy Stephen a new laptop? Here's some breaking news from the podcast Home Front. Stephen sent a text where I was like, today. I was like, hey, can you look this thing up for me really quick? And then he text me back.

[00:12:19]

Elvis just barfed on my laptop and then sent me a short video of him trying to start up the laptop. And it's starting and immediately shutting down Moses like.

[00:12:29]

All right. Talk to you later. Of course. Is like. I'm so sorry. You're like you just had your laptop. Like, you want to apologize. He's apologizing to us. Elvis is gone. You guys, I'm sorry, but the Elvis and Maemi and Instagram is about to go fuck in advertising advertising because they need to make some fucking money cause laptops are not cheap. What kind of advertiser you're going to do on that? I don't know.

[00:12:51]

Cat food, cat, darling. Maybe some kind of anti nausea pills. Zappelli Imodium, a d something we have over there. I said backstage that. Sorry, Stephen, you're getting a Dell. They still make those. What's in sheet computer. You're just like, make your own computer and bill me. What if I was like I. Well, I have. You can have my old laptop or my old MacBook Pro. That's like this heavy is this table.

[00:13:18]

And about as large. Yet those ones are like had blue on the back. And then you could see even if we got your computer. Don't worry about it. Yes. You just have to leave it at George's house and come here to use it. But don't come over too often. Soon it'll be like an Internet cafe that's only open from three to four. We'll be like a cat cafe. Yeah. I wonder if a cat barked at your on your laptop at a cat cafe.

[00:13:42]

Would they have to buy you one? Probably not. Those are the same rules. Go for my house then, because it's essentially a cat cafe.

[00:13:49]

I mean, I'm still on that question of like, whoa, is that is there a certain insurance you have to buy for a cat cafe or if they bite you and then put fleas on your dress?

[00:13:58]

Yes, I'm suing Amsterdam, like Italy. What about all the everywhere we went? Because we'd probably ended up going to like four of those Catholic. We'd just walk and then be like, look, let's go in there. It says, feel good, let's get in there. We just kept doing that.

[00:14:15]

And everywhere we'd go, I'd be like, Oh, I fucking love this song. And let's write it down for like, this is gonna be the Amsterdam mix. I tried to put the Amsterdam mix on the green room backstage. Muir George and I were both like, the fuck is this song?

[00:14:31]

Turn it off. Well, we were feeling good last night or yesterday. Every song. Terrible music. We did end up in what we. Oh, I have to tell you something. We were heading back to the hotel. We'd like to go to sleep. And we walked by this bar and I was like, this is the most beautiful bar from the outside. Like, exactly what I want to kind of diety. We go in. It was the fucking cutest bar was like from the past.

[00:14:56]

Right. Which we don't have in Lausanne. So you're very excited. But it wasn't even near the best. It wasn't grimy. Right. It was the best I've ever been to. Not going to pronounce the name. Right. But it turns out it was the first lesbian bar in Amsterdam, the first gay bar in Amsterdam. Look it up.

[00:15:12]

You'll find it. It was amazing. It was. Well, they had the best.

[00:15:21]

And it had it did little for some reason. It had these little tables that folded out from the wall you got. Are you familiar with. You always have these because they fold out and there's a light in a mirror. I was like this a perfect table for me. What if we were just at McDonald's? We were so high.

[00:15:39]

They serve these burgers. It was the best burger I've ever had. We're like, I love this song. It's butter. Up, up, up, up, up in it. We got the fish and chips. We got a fucking filet of fish. The best fish and chips I've ever heard. Then we destroyed it. All this would destroy you.

[00:15:59]

Oh, wait.

[00:15:59]

Remember that. Should we not relive it? That disturbing moment at the laundromat when we were walking back to the hotel on our way home. Remember that.

[00:16:08]

Oh.

[00:16:09]

Oh, you don't remember it. We were walking by. We passed the laundromat, Vince. Vince goes, Oh, that's where I took all the clothes. We're like, Oh, neat. And then there's a cat laying in the window. And Georgia, we're all far enough along that. We're like Cat again. I took a photo of every cat, including it's including this cat that's just laying on its back. All cute. And I go, like, I'm going to take a picture and there's a girl sitting with her back to the window next to the cat.

[00:16:36]

And she starts it's it looks like she's just playing with the cat. Like it's cute for the picture. Yeah. But then she covers the cat's face from the picture. Yeah. And fuckin moves it really hard leaving the window. I was like, is this like the red light district rule or you can't take pictures. You should post something. It was like no photo. She was no photos about the cat. But then I read an article that's really kind of interesting about how tourism has gotten so essentially bad in Amsterdam.

[00:17:08]

There's so much tourism that, like there was a woman they interviewed who lives right down there and like the beautiful part, Bicheno, who's like there's just fuckin douche drunk douchebags that are stoned walking by barfing and her like planter.

[00:17:22]

Although welcome to college, I guess. Right. People are like it's like second year collaging here in Amsterdam. And but one thing she said about that was the problem is you have to scoop it out.

[00:17:35]

So I'd be pissed, too. I was just trying to figure out what the cat lady's problem was like. Maybe she has a point. Maybe somebody took pictures of that cat, put out a calendar, made twenty five million dollars. She got nothing. The cat got nothing. People keep coming by to take photos of the famous cat. Yeah, periphery. She's like, fuck all y'all. You gotta have an Instagram account. To sit down. Oh, this is my favorite word of the pie cow.

[00:18:02]

Hi.

[00:18:03]

Thank you. That's Karen Kilgariff. This is Georgia Hard Star. Hi. Warren Sirnak. You know, I wash my hands since Ritchie's doing this thing instead of holding hands with me where she's holding it like a crab. But I don't understand it. Is it because this dress smells so bad?

[00:18:22]

Yeah. Didn't want to tell you, but you said it first. It's not on my hands, though. We've been to Amsterdam and now and we went to Sweden. We got Swedish massages because of course we did. We went to Oslo.

[00:18:35]

Thank you so much. This is crazy. Let's sit down. OK. OK, well. All right. So what are you guys.

[00:18:43]

Hold on. I would have this in my house. Yeah. It's a good one from surfie. It's a good one. Gorgeous.

[00:18:51]

This is a very special live show. This is the first time we've ever had a square table. I'm not kidding. I like it.

[00:18:58]

I know. It's so like it's so Amsterdam.

[00:19:01]

You know, the way that it's made of wood and there's tourist barf underneath it. Yeah. There's my eye. I was looking for a minute before I left the dressing room just to have a quick mint. And I couldn't find one. So then I put this piece of candy in my mouth, which is not good for the top of a talking show. What if I'm not?

[00:19:22]

Don't. Don't put it on mine. I didn't. What if. OK. Let's see this scenario. You accidentally pulled the wrong keys. Can't pot candy out last night. You didn't eat it. And it turned out to this. And so you snuck out during the show. Get really fucking baked.

[00:19:35]

Then I be like, I love this song. And they're like, there's no Sunday, no song.

[00:19:43]

Let's carve out initials into this. All right.

[00:19:46]

When no one's looking. Yeah. This is a true crime comedy podcast. It gets confusing. We had to tell the Customs dude in Ireland about it. He was like, what are you guys doing here? And it was just really awkward for a minute. And we told him. And then you do it better than I do the voice.

[00:20:04]

Well, because we had he said, you know, what is the purpose of your visit? And then we were like, work. And then he's like, what kind of work? And then we have to say, it's a podcast which we're figuring most people don't know or understand what like especially a live podcast. It's like, no, you know, it's like a radio show, except what we do it in front of. We make them come to a theater and look at us in our dresses, at our table.

[00:20:29]

It's nothing special or square apologizing. And then he asked the name of it. So then Georgias as the name.

[00:20:35]

Hoping that we don't get arrested in Dublin.

[00:20:40]

And instead of having any kind of a negative reaction, he goes, oh, yeah, there was some American girl came through here on Friday. She told me all about it.

[00:20:55]

And then he goes, she was in and we're like, that sounds right. That sounds exactly right. That's what it is. That was Kelly. It was our listener, Kelly.

[00:21:07]

And then when we came through customs here, we said like, oh, we're doing a live podcast. And the guy goes, I'm not going to do the accent, obviously. He goes, well, like in a bar. You're like, OK. Yeah, you're you're right. It totally should be in an empty bar. But I was so mad. I'm just like, do you have bars that hold over 800 people? Forget it.

[00:21:29]

Why am I yelling at a customs officer? That's a bad idea. Harian, back here and stop it. You're going to get us arrested. OK. You going first? Is it me? Yeah. Right. Is it. Do you want to. Yes. OK. Right. I'm going to do with.

[00:21:46]

Fun age.

[00:21:48]

Well, I don't know him. They don't know him or they don't like him or he's here and it's awkward. I mean, I thought there would at least be a smattering of applause, like just some golf. No, no, no. That's not a damn. It is too late.

[00:22:10]

They're like, well, wouldn't it be wrong to applaud for a serial killer? Right. Yes, you're right. Just some recognition, for Christ sake.

[00:22:20]

Because this man is considered one of the few real serial killers that's from here. Oh.

[00:22:25]

So I thought they'd be like, oh, I went to high school. Fine. So a lot of the information that's in this I'm about to tell you, it's it's very much Wikipedia based, as most of my work is. But there's also a book called Anatomy of a Serial Killer that's written by. I want to pronounce his name STEEZ. But I bet you that's how you pronounce. So we need a pick. Oh, we need a pig.

[00:22:52]

We need a pig. A translator. Seats. Eat it. Listen, we're picking a translator. Pokerface. Oh, okay. I know how to pronounce it now. Well, you're gonna pick a translator. This is what I've been doing. You raise the right two ladies. They look very professional. They are the only ones who can yell at us.

[00:23:11]

This is how we've gotten to control the yelling.

[00:23:14]

Yeah. What are you. What's your name? LeAnn, Kim, and you're from here. OK, great. What if they're from like North Carolina but they're like, oh, quickly, do you do the accent, do an accent like a person from Amsterdam? What are those?

[00:23:29]

The names that like when we were in Sweden, they would tell us their name, you know, or like introduce themselves to it and a name we couldn't pronounce and then we'd go try to pronounce it. Then they go, just Christie, it's Christie. Just call us Christie because we know you're fucking Americans. Can't get it. Wilhem fund it.

[00:23:47]

That's the other thing is I think when you speak American, English is like Super Nazel and it's just like net.

[00:23:53]

Net. Yeah. Right. You know, you've heard us over and over again, like you go to other countries and then it's kind of like I feel like. This language is more like you're inhaling, it's a yeah. Like, keep it in. Oh, shut up. Well, I'm on it. I was like, but it's not like it's like. It's like I'm choking on a steak.

[00:24:23]

OK, well, I'm like is born August 13th, 1941 in Qatar, Netherlands.

[00:24:34]

They don't even know how to help you. Should I show you the paper that. Really. Where we're Gortner are I said, Cordura, are you? You can't be like that if you're going to be a translator. We can't. This is not what's not about perfection. It's about barely getting over the finish line.

[00:25:05]

Please. Oh, my God. It's a complicated.

[00:25:08]

OK, so his Willams is a complicated birth. Also, I'd never heard of anyone with the name Wilhem except for Willem Dafoe, the American actor. So I found this exciting also. So here's is a complicated birth later in his life. Doctor, doctors would speculate that he probably sustained some brain damage during it. So he basically starts life with a head injury, which we all know was very bad for the child. Also, his home life is an ideal.

[00:25:36]

His father is known as honest and a passionate man, whereas his mother is described as a bad housekeeper, withdrawn, unreliable, suspicious and cold. Sounds fun. I can't. I wonder if they mean that she was suspicious of other people or if she was like touching stuff all the time.

[00:26:01]

She was the hand burglar she has. She just had cold hands and weird eyes. Also bad housekeeper. That's a judgment call. And that should be compared to who? Not me, that's for sure.

[00:26:14]

Also, a bad woman that doesn't make you know what a bad woman isn't. That that doesn't make this the worst way. Could have said that.

[00:26:22]

Bless you. I know. I thought suddenly you were speaking. Oh, I didn't tell you. I see. Please don't start doing that. Not now. OK.

[00:26:34]

In elementary school, he's an outcast. Course always starts the same way. He gets the nickname Crazy Little Wilhem, which sounds like it could be fun and cute. But apparently was not. He's bullied, hits school is hellish. And it turns out later that he is like when he grows up, he's almost completely illiterate. So he starts collecting dead frogs and bugs. Right. What you do when you're a social outcast, then people in the village start to notice that he's also very cruel to living animals.

[00:27:10]

So his interest is in the deadness.

[00:27:14]

He's he's especially cruel to dogs, cats and dogs, which is very sad.

[00:27:19]

How can you catch a dog to be cruel to you, though? Know, I think you you just run after it and you just outrun it. The duck sounds hard. They have they don't have great running feet.

[00:27:35]

Then he when he's 10, he gets another concussion or he gets his first, like outside the womb concussion.

[00:27:43]

And for two years, he suffers from severe headache.

[00:27:47]

So I get that Tylenol with codeine, right. In high school. He's a loner. And according to him, women found him very creepy and disgusting, according to him.

[00:28:00]

Well, a lot of this is according to him, because the book, Anatomy of a Serial Killer is like interviews with jail jailhouse interview. I thought you said he wrote. It was like, oh, no, no, he can't.

[00:28:10]

Oh, maybe he had a transcribed and he could dictated into a Dictaphone. One of those. Yeah. Dictaphone. That's right. OK. So he brings that up a lot later on in his crimes that he basically blames the fact that women rejected him for the fact that he had to go ahead and end their lives. Which I always think is so interesting. It's like you, you know, they found you creepy and disgusting. So you don't try to reverse that in any way or just work on anything, just like stop having weird eyes like your mom or whatever.

[00:28:48]

No, just kill or find. The check is in the creepy and disgusting. That's right. Girls out there, ladies. Don't you have a creepy and disgusting club at your high school? Join it.

[00:29:05]

I lost my place. So in high school.

[00:29:09]

That's when he starts breaking into houses. It's always the same. Breaking into houses, stealing stuff, underwear, petty, petty crimes. And when he's 21, he starts to have these vivid dreams, which is what he told that author about, about raping and killing women, which most people call those nightmares. Well, um. But whatever, you know, he's quoted as saying. At first, they were beautiful, but they became increasingly violent and inhumane.

[00:29:38]

They were beautiful. Well, like they were just plain not editable dreams. Got it. Then they became increasingly violent and inhumane. I dreamed of cutting never firearms. Great. Thank you.

[00:29:49]

Good scientists and from women I knew from our village or from the neighborhood. In the long run, it got worse. And when I was twenty nine thirty, it became a real drama.

[00:30:02]

Taurama. Oh my God. So much drama. So then he says that he would walk around all day thinking about these violent, horrible dreams that he was having and basically stay in this like creepy, disgusting fantasy all day long. So, you know, you wonder why no one was attracted to you.

[00:30:20]

Maybe just like. So 1966. He's 25. He very briefly marries and is divorced in August of the same year. He serves eight months in prison because he helped steal. I don't know if this is translation or if it's just he's boring, but he helped steal lead and batteries to other people's legs.

[00:30:43]

Boring. That's sweet. You got to get that sweet sweet led.

[00:30:47]

What if it was something super cool, like a fucking time machine, but it translated to let him batter. Right. And wires and wires. Or maybe he was just making his own pencils. Either way, he's a creep. So he goes under a court ordered supervision. Oh I should. I never looked this up. Maybe you'll know what this means. Court ordered supervision of the Protestant probation. No, look, as if on cue, they both looked at each other and were like, I probably just means that.

[00:31:22]

I don't know.

[00:31:23]

Yeah, I. I highlighted it and everything to be like, go talk about. Yeah. Find out what that means. Then I just started putting on eyeshadow. I don't really care. I don't care. Maybe some kind of a church thing. Sure. He had to go. He had go to church. So anyway, they do a psychological exam. They find out he has a tendency toward anger and aggression. And they also the examination shows that he has gross gaps intellectually, but not.

[00:31:51]

I don't think that's a judgment call. I think they mean large.

[00:31:55]

OK. It's just like. Yeah, yeah.

[00:31:58]

It's just like you're this old and you only know that many words. Well, um. OK.

[00:32:05]

So on in June 1971, 15 year old Cora Mantell is taking the bus to Amsterdam to meet up with her boyfriend on the 20th of that month. She misses her. Oh, shit. She misses her bus home to. I taun. I can say that I i taun. I mean, now we're at the point where I just don't believe I can pronounce anything yet. So that's where she's from course from my taun. So basically, she goes into Amsterdam to meet up with her boyfriend.

[00:32:44]

She misses the bus because they're, like, there for five minutes longer or whatever. Or, I mean, in the park or wherever, whatever they're doing in love. So she ends up she decides that she's going to hitchhike home.

[00:32:58]

Yes. And it's 1971. Oh, it's just the height of hitchhiking. Yeah. So she ends up getting picked up by then. Right. Did I say right.

[00:33:12]

Like she hates you. Yes.

[00:33:18]

OK. So she has no idea anything's amiss other than he's creepy and disgusting. But it's a ride. Whatever. Until they get to Eichhorn and he drives her almost all the way home. And then he goes a different direction. And and then she starts to panic. He stops the car. And according to his account, he says to her, we are going to say goodbye to each other.

[00:33:47]

That's the creepiest. Yes. Just like you mean out here in the middle of fucking nowhere, we're going to say goodbye to each other. So she tries to get out of the car. He grabs her scarf and he strangles her with her own scarf and then rapes her, drives her body to a dead end road, strips her naked, throws her body into a ditch. She's not discovered until two days later, on June 22nd, 1971. She was supposed to start a new job at a jewelry store in Elsmere.

[00:34:18]

Oh. Base, you gave everyone about it. Did you hear that guy goes? Yeah. She didn't even ask Kim Marandoo care. So she was supposed to. She was so sick. She had gotten this new job at a jewelry store. She was supposed to start it. She doesn't show up. And so and her body hadn't been found, but she was missing. So then the jeweler becomes a suspect. Oh, no. Yes. And until they find her body.

[00:34:49]

So nothing's proven. The case goes cold. Then three years later, on August 19th, 1974, the lifeless body of 43 year old, a 43 year old nurse named I'll Git Vandar Plot is found behind some newer near a cornfield. It's terrible. She's been raped. Her stomach has been ripped open. She's been disemboweled. And her left breast has been mutilated.

[00:35:12]

She's been stabbed a total of 27 times, Alicia. So there are six witnesses that report that they see Wilhem riding his moped around the scene of the crime that night after it happens, before her body is found.

[00:35:29]

No. Then the night her body is discovered, he's just fucking buzzing the area. Shields's moped, super chill. Can you imagine, like, oh, this awful thing.

[00:35:38]

Yeah, but cookbook poker face.

[00:35:40]

Yes, he's poker facing it all around, but more like thens creep on a moped is the worst kind of driver. You want that person to be like carefree, like yay. I've got the world on a string. More WS Anderson and less. Yeah. It's fuckin Dracula.

[00:36:00]

Yeah. Yeah. Okay.

[00:36:03]

So it turns out so all these people tell the police, like, this guy is disgusting. And they find out that Wilhem lives down the street on a houseboat called the English translation is the freedom. So the police go. They question him about the murder. And he immediately confesses and he gets arrested on his dumb houseboat.

[00:36:29]

I'm like very interested in houseboats, I think would be super cool to live on one here. It's like we. Came out of a couple of those fucking cafes and we're like, look at the boat.

[00:36:41]

At one point, Vince is like, oh, we could we could take a tour of the city on a boat. And I was like, but what if I can't get off the boat?

[00:36:47]

I was just completely picturing myself. Like, I step on the boat. They shut whatever the gate is. We take off, man.

[00:36:53]

I'm like. She jumped in the water. International incident there is there was a cat boat person boat. But we didn't go on it because I was already up. Please. That's right.

[00:37:08]

If that cat hadn't beat you, you'd have been the captain, the pussy cat all moved on you today because guys, you've been like and the show's cancelled because Georgia won't get off the cat.

[00:37:21]

Stevens, like I understand is like I'll be there in 48 hours. OK, so he's confessors is arrested. He basically tells the police, I'm relieved. He explains that he saw Ilja walking down the road. He got the idea to, quote, do something with the woman. He goes back to the House vote. He grabs a knife. He rides up behind her on his on his moped. He shows her the knife. He threatens her, says, you have to come with me.

[00:37:52]

He pulls her to the area where her body is found. He when she tries to fight him off as he's raping her, that's when he stops. On August 21st, Williams arrested Gonzalez. But I said that already. But it's written here twice. And he confesses to the murders of both Ulja and Cora Mantell. So at age 33, William Van Dyke is tried and sentenced to 18 years in prison and voluntary commitment to psychiatric hospital.

[00:38:20]

So the details of the murder are so horrifying that when the trial, when everyone gives their testimony in court, two or several, it says, of the guards vomit in the courtroom. Oh, it's so awful to hear. And the press describes him as a man without emotion and someone who has no remorse for his crimes. And he's sentenced to 18 years. Yeah, I think that's Max here. I bet that I bet he gets out quicker than that.

[00:38:47]

Well. Five years later, he's still in jail.

[00:38:54]

He's Dylan, do you think, Guy but he puts out he's lonely, so he puts out a personal ad in the newspaper and from jail, from jail, explaining that he's a 38 year old man who loves houseboats and mopeds and he's looking for a relationship with a woman, love.

[00:39:14]

And he specifies in his ad that children are not a problem.

[00:39:18]

Oh, great. Yeah. So gather round, children. So a woman named Audrey responds to the ad. They begin to correspond. I think over here, they call them pen friends, which makes me laugh because in America we call them pen pals. So stupid, do you? Right. So it's tip pen pals is dumb to you, pen friends is dumb. Oh, the crazy place. Anyway, it's a small world after all.

[00:39:48]

OK. So eventually she comes to visit him in prison. He tells her he that he is murdered two women. He fesses up to her. You think she would have asked about that beforehand? Like a first letter. What are you in for? Make it quick. Like. But she's not typing on a computer. Hey, quick question. What about a wall computer?

[00:40:06]

What if she's typing on that McDonald's menu board? Destroy that shit. Maybe she was on a typewriter. That's what I was doing.

[00:40:18]

Well, anyway, either way, he keeps it from her and so they meet in person.

[00:40:22]

Then he says, I've murdered two women.

[00:40:24]

She's like, look, we've all had a tough time of it, honey, or some shit, because while he's still in jail in 1982, they get married.

[00:40:34]

OK. And I don't do that.

[00:40:37]

She she ends up because she's the only one who understands him and ends up hiding this marriage from her family, including her five children.

[00:40:48]

It's tons.

[00:40:51]

It's bad enough to have to get a new stepdad. Yeah. And then it's fuckin William. Willa, we love Willem Dafoe. What do we owe?

[00:41:01]

So. So when it is time for him to be paroled because of this marriage, the authorities believe that he can cause assimilate back into normal because they're like he has somewhere to go and a person. Yeah. Look after. And he's clearly he couldn't do it before, but now all he needed was the love of a good woman.

[00:41:22]

Right. Again, it's women's fault there is there in the center of everything they need Jakes to do. What that creepy, disgusting man says, then he'll stop killing. So. His relationship. They do say it could prevent him from murdering. But they warn that more female rejection could trigger a relapse. Because, quote, the core of his problem has not been treated substantially anyway by women.

[00:41:51]

See you later. Good luck. There's your shit. Don't let the screen door hit in the ass on the way out, as we say in my family. So when he's released in 1990, he and his wife of eight years who he doesn't know that well, they move in into a house in Herkes deed. That means you got it right or they don't know her whole head went over to the side like this. That can't be positive. Nobody else said anything either.

[00:42:23]

I think they're just being polite. Oh, no. Well, it doesn't matter. They're basically trying to tell us it doesn't matter.

[00:42:30]

Thanks, guys. So watch this. He goes to a clinic in Gron again.

[00:42:36]

Grown again. OK. So he starts going to that clinic again for psychiatric care. He's described by the staff as one of the most difficult patients they've ever treat. Can you can you imagine at a mental hospital.

[00:42:51]

Yeah. That's bad. Yeah, it's not at Starbucks. And then so that's like outpatient treatment, apparently. But then for a job and for a business, him and his wife start a pet sitting business.

[00:43:08]

Got problems with them. Yeah.

[00:43:10]

Because remember his history with ducks and puppies and dead frogs, Davian Demon.

[00:43:17]

So within six months, as we might have, all guest problems begin to arise in the home. Will them start drinking and heavily. And then pretty soon his wife takes her, gathers up her five children and gets the fuck out. So that's when he begins to regularly hire sex workers in his home. So in November of 1993, the body of 23 year old Michelle Fractal is found in a ditch near the village of in a motel. Got it.

[00:43:48]

Keep going. They've just abandoned us. Earlier we asked you to do something. You don't even know what I'm saying. It's that bad, really. I'm so mad at you. Right. E and u m 80 I. L.

[00:44:06]

That doesn't exist in a it doesn't matter anymore. In a village, the body of a twenty three year old sex worker is found in a ditch and she's been strangled to death.

[00:44:23]

And then 14 months later, January 21st, 1995, the body of 31 year old sex worker name on a lease rendezvous is found in the M Canal near up. And get them.

[00:44:37]

Yeah. I'm gonna move here. I'm gonna teach English classes. Okay.

[00:44:44]

Later that same year, the torso of a 24 year old sex worker. No. Antoinette Bonke is found in winds. Shut her up.

[00:44:56]

And then later on, other body parts of hers are found in a duffel bag.

[00:45:01]

So basically, just idjit dead sex workers just start showing up over and over. Less than two years after that, the body of 19 year old sex worker named Shirley Hair Jr.'s is found. And then when they find her body, the police find out that her friend, Yolanda Meyer, is also missing. So then about three years after Shirleys bodies just discovered on July 17th, 2001, the body of 34 year old Scott Sosha Chancre is found in a canal.

[00:45:33]

Police discover that William Van IHC is a regular customer of hers. And, of course, then he becomes prime suspect. When her clothes are found several months later in the same canal near his house in a plastic bag weighted down with stones. That's when they arrest him. So why why don't write his name on land? So four months after they find her personal items on November 12th, 2001, William Van Eyck is arrested upon suspicion of murder. He confesses to killing Michelle.

[00:46:07]

The toll on police, reindeers and Soska chancre. Police also suspect him of two other unsolved murders. Antoinette Bonte and Yolanda Meier. But he does not confessed to those crimes. So authorities excavate the ground all around his house. But they don't find anything. They think they're going to find missing bodies, but they don't find anything and they can't find any hard evidence linking him to those two crimes. But between his release and his first release in 1990 and his second arrest, there were eight sex workers and several other young women murdered in and around the area where he lived.

[00:46:45]

But why wouldn't he confessed to all of them? I don't know, because they said he did it, fuckin asshole.

[00:46:51]

But maybe he didn't do that. Scary. What's scary is that maybe there were like four fuckin murderers. Well, not always. That's always a possibility. Always. Definitely.

[00:47:02]

So on November 7th, 2002, he's tried, convicted and sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Michelle Fattal, unleashed Reynders and Soska chancre. He tries to appeal. The Supreme Court of the Netherlands is like, go fuck yourself forever.

[00:47:18]

All of his requests for clemency are denied. They're just like, no, we we we we did it wrong the first time this shit is over.

[00:47:27]

His lawyer got what it was up to. That was 2002. His lawyer reads his statement and it says, quote, I killed those women. It's terrible. I did not want that.

[00:47:38]

It happened to me, dude. No, I did not think of it before. And it's still a mystery to me that has caused me to what has caused me to act like that. I am not a monster disagreed. I did not want all this to to say that you are sorry is easy, but that is not what it is meant to be. I am sorry. I wish I could undo it even if I would be at the expense of my own life.

[00:48:05]

Sounds great. And as of 2013, Yolanda Meyer's body has not found. That's the most recent. I was doing that thing. Have you done the thing where you look been article on Google and you hit Google Translate? Yes. And then the article comes up in the most insane English that you're just like. What is this, a fairy tale? Yes, I'm kind. I'm trying to read these stories. Yes. But from what I could and that is like five years ago.

[00:48:30]

So there might be an update since. But her body has not been found from the last thing I could find on Google. And although it was never proven that William was responsible for her disappearance, it's published publicly, believed that he killed both Shirley Haggar's and Yolanda Jemiah. Oh, so that. What everyone around town thinks, and that is Willem Van Eyck, everybody, oh, my God. A job. It's just so crazy that there are these like huges murders and serial killers and all over the world and I've never heard of them.

[00:49:07]

I know every time every story we've done here on our trip is like, what the fuck this would have been?

[00:49:12]

I should've known about this. Yeah, but they didn't know that, sir.

[00:49:17]

OK. OK, I want to say this name right. Good fucking luck. I am doing the story of the murderer. Elsia. Christiane's. They've never heard of that. I said it wrong. It could be my fault. Elsia that's her name. OK. So Elsia, Christiane or just Christian was born in sixteen forty six in Denmark who a while ago.

[00:49:47]

While this is an oldie. That's why they don't know are. This is like classic.

[00:49:53]

It's a you know from the old time hours.

[00:49:57]

You know, he's it's one of these. All right. There's a lot on the podcast you can't see. Yeah. We talk about back in the day. It's usually a hitchhiking motion. It's OK. It's born in sixteen, forty six. There's not a ton of shit known about her life from before. Because it's fucking old. You didn't undo some scrolls. No. Try to get some information off.

[00:50:19]

And from what it sounds like, she's just a normal human being. But in the spring of sixteen, sixty four, she she's 18 years old and she leaves Denmark, wants a new life and moves to Amsterdam, which is booming fucking town at this point. There's not a ton of information about this murder. So let me tell you about Amsterdam. Oh, I loved it in the 17th century. I need to hear. OK, great. I wish I should have known about this beforehand.

[00:50:46]

In the 17th century was Amsterdam's golden age.

[00:50:51]

Karen was who I think now is. I mean, right. Barfing tourists in the year 16, Hamsterdam emerges as one of the world's most important centers of trade. Everyone, you know this. You went to school here. They're like, yeah, I did this report in sixth grade. You're copying my report with trade. Obviously came wealth and a blossoming arts and science. I was fucking scrounging. Yeah. So what was their main export? Chrome?

[00:51:25]

Well, it also became a vibrant cultural hub.

[00:51:29]

And one of three, Amsterdam. Ours was an immigrant. It turns out. Wow, LA Safad. Jews were fleeing persecution in Spain and Portugal, you know.

[00:51:37]

Yes. Over there. So your menorah was real. Let's pray. Yeah, sure, I should have.

[00:51:42]

But it was from the 16th 50, isn't it? OK, but. But whatever.

[00:51:49]

And then it's that around the time cheese was invented.

[00:51:54]

Yeah. And I wrote again with trade came wealth and philosophy. Oh. And then she drew a picture of downtown Amsterdam like you used to do, and book reports to fill up a whole page. Huh. Remember that. You be like here's Abe Lincoln. SAOs. Pretty sure they didn't do that. We did that. Yeah. That was that was our guy. Sorry. They're like we like school. OK. Also, listen, ships for list.

[00:52:24]

Shit. The boy wanted ships to fuck. Is this shit. Yeah. We basically accidentally started a podcast where now we have to travel the world giving book reports to cities about their own cities. Both college dropouts. This is ridiculous. You bought a ticket. It might still be high from yesterday. Oh, that'll be cool, like a second. High kicked in. We're just. Tell me about ships. Import export.

[00:53:05]

Keep eating my teeth with this microphone. OK. But then spices. Spices happen to bring spices, goods of a leading financial center. Then I write about something that interests me, which is the bubonic plague.

[00:53:21]

The bubonic plague fucking comes around from and from sixteen sixty three to sixteen sixty six where that 10 percent of the population died of play. That's fucking fun, right? By 16 17. No fewer than two hundred and twenty thousand people lived in the city is fucking crowded. They built more of it. You guys know the story. But look back to sixteen, sixty four when our our gal Elsia is 18 years old. She comes to Amsterdam. She's like, I want to live here.

[00:53:52]

She finds a place to live. She runs a room in the land with the landlord lady that's so like independent for a gal 69. I know. I wonder what she was like. She wants to be a maid. So she starts looking for a job to get to be a maid. But within two weeks, she can't find a job. She is running out of money. She can't pay rent. And let's see. She lived on the.

[00:54:16]

Dam rack, dome, rock. Thank you, you guys. Then you'll know that it's an avenue and partially filled canal. Oh, yes, yes, yes. The Donora and Amsterdam Central and the Northern DOMS Square on the south. And she looks for a job. I hear there's a great McDonald's over there. Oh, man.

[00:54:38]

I wrote it up. Poor people back then in Amsterdam. What were they like? Well, they they they didn't have a system of civic poor relief and charitable institutions. Well, that's nice. Yeah. So the old and the insane, the sick and the orphans were supported. Whatever.

[00:54:53]

So emotionally. Yeah, it's like. Yeah, keep it up you guys. You'll get there some day. Don't give up. Don't drop out of college. So ship a job. The landlady's fucking pissed about it. One morning she wakes elsia up and is like pay me rent. And Elson's like a cat. And the landlady grabs a fuckin broom and starts hitting her with that. Don't pay me rent.

[00:55:19]

Elsa does what any fucking normal person does and sees a fucking ex lying there and picks it up.

[00:55:27]

Yeah, because they just put a big axe shipment that morning. Right. One of the many axes imported from Canada. And even though the landlady's right, Elsie is like, no, I can hit her with wax. I think it was a couple times. It's hard. You know, there's no oil. And then she falls down a flight of stairs into the cellar and she lays there dead. Shit. Meanwhile, the neighbors, because it seems like you just that every wall is shared in the city.

[00:55:55]

Yeah. Ah. Like that sounded bad. So they they come over. Was there a broom axe fight in here just a second ago. Because we are positive. I heard a distinct sounds of a broom slash axe. Miramax spy.

[00:56:10]

Yeah. Stairs. Someone brought a broom, don't ax. Yes. I didn't want to. Thank you. Thank you. Bring a broom through an axe. It's true, though. But how would you.

[00:56:31]

OK. So she answers the door to the neighbors and she's like, covered in blood. And they're like, something's going on. She runs out to try to run away and they go in and discover the body. I think they must chase after her or something because she jumps into one of the canals. I would, too, you know, but she can't swim, so I would not.

[00:56:54]

So the bystanders help her out of the water and they bring her before the city magistrates. When questioned, though, she eventually confesses to the murder of her landlady, she's taken to trial. She's found guilty and sentenced to death. Shit. That was fast for her, huh? Yeah.

[00:57:09]

She's like looking for a job one day. She's like, here's me in the big so shit. Now I'm going to be killed by the government.

[00:57:21]

So this is this is the first execution of a woman in Amsterdam in 21 years. So, of course, the public goes fucking shit like crazy. And it's a big spectacle. And they do it in front of everyone back then. Executions, executions were like HBO back, just like primo cable telling.

[00:57:38]

Exactly. So everyone wanted to come watch, but. OK. So the method of execution is also controversial. So even for that, back then in the sixteen hundreds such as like fucking drawn and quartered. Yeah. Times when you like it. The standard way was being let tarred and feathered. I think you're right. I didn't look that part up. Let's just keep naming ways. People used to get killed. Let's see. Well, here's one.

[00:58:07]

She would be strangled with the garrotte.

[00:58:09]

Remember that from JonBenet Ramsey? Yes. Thank you. My cap. And at the same time, she would be hit in the head with an axe. Not just any axe, but the axe that she used to kill her fucking landlady.

[00:58:23]

That's a vengeance. I hope you learned your lesson. Oh, wait. You're dead.

[00:58:29]

Like bug. People were like, great. What time do we get to watch? I want to pull my kids out of school. Is it going to be at 1:00 or 2:00? I got to start dinner at three because it's old and time. We have dinner. Or the sun goes down. Right. Right. We'll die of the Google Play. That's right. That's what they thought caused it back then. That's not true. Don't quote me on that.

[00:58:51]

This is when the book report goes way out of control.

[00:58:54]

Well, we found out recently from our friend that the show Drunk History, which is so great that they're using our research for their new season.

[00:59:02]

We're like, don't do that. All right, do it.

[00:59:06]

She's going to be a good season, I guess. Blah, blah, blah. Same acts. Public thinks the solution. That's not how you say it took place in the central damn square, Domme Square in Amsterdam. You guys have been there. They used to kill people. OK. So not only is she going to get fucking strangled and then some guy has to hit her in the head with the axe afterwords, they're going to publicly display her body.

[00:59:32]

Oh. Which is the thing they did back then with like particularly bad criminals to beat to to humiliate them in their death, but also to be like, don't kill your landlady with an axe. Right. So, everyone, this is what happens to you. This is the only way you'll learn. Right. Just the Bible hadn't been invented yet. Who knows? OK. Nobody knows. We don't know and we can't find out moving. I tried to look it up on the McDonald's screen, right?

[01:00:05]

I just read the Bible.

[01:00:07]

What I love is sorry sidebar. I just. You had to order ketchups on that screen. Oh, McDonald's will get cheap, y'all.

[01:00:15]

They will not give you catch up unless you beg for it. Like a peasant. And so I was like final. I'll pay for an extra for a catch up or whatever. And then when I went to walk away, I opened a bag and there is no ketchup. And I went back with just a hideous American tourist and I just held up the receipt.

[01:00:35]

You were not fucking around. But how good was the McDonald's? It was so much better than a Mario Donalds. It was like clearly made with love. And I thank you for that.

[01:00:47]

I have just realized I've had McDonald's three times on this trip. Let's make it one more day. It was better than in Dublin. And when we were in Oslo, that was the next McDonald's bar. We get to a lot of places very late.

[01:01:01]

We're like, we're staying at hotels. We're like, oh, no, we stopped serving. We stopped serving everything. I know. Please help us. We don't know what time it is. We haven't slept in hours. That's right. I need to sleep for at least 16 hours a day or night initially falls apart. Two hours. I need a nap. I'm like a six month old baby. You have to feed me and then put me to bed every two fucking hours.

[01:01:33]

I'm like a six month pregnant woman and I eat four to take a nap all the time.

[01:01:39]

OK. All right. How's my hair? It's great. What I'm doing. She's shoot up on the side a little bit more. There it is. Erica, thanks. No.

[01:01:50]

Stop it again, Donald. OK.

[01:02:00]

It's sort of like greased my hair with the dog. We're like you when you call as an American.

[01:02:06]

When you come to Europe, you try to be not American. You try to just not talk and pretend. You just apologize the whole time and try to pretend that you're from somewhere. And we've just fucking American added up all. I mean, there's just no mistake, you know, like you guys think now.

[01:02:25]

OK, OK.

[01:02:27]

Her body was displayed, quote, to be digested by the air and the birds. Oh, yes.

[01:02:34]

Lift it to rock up at the gallows field. There's a whole area for it outside the city. OK, there. So her. Her body was hung on a Gibert. Do you know that is. Sure. Let me tell you what. OK, great detail. Great. It's getting what it's the gallows type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of criminals are hung on public display. And sometimes it's like the body shaped cage so that they can't even like they have to stay in like human looking for the whole fucking time.

[01:03:04]

I mean, even like a my nose itches. No, I think it's like the dead people, too, or it's like they can't fall off of it. They have to stay in there like.

[01:03:13]

Captain, this case is horrifying, though. I mean, yes. So it almost is like a sewing mannequin, but you can see through. Yes. There you go. And then there's a person in there rotting. Huh? Bup, bup, bup, bup, bup. OK. It's supposed to deter other existing or potential criminals. Doesn't do it. Nope. Nope. That doesn't work. OK. So OK. And then alongside her body.

[01:03:37]

So she's hung up. And then next to her hanging next to her head is the axe. She's like they can knock it over this fucking.

[01:03:44]

Yes. She's just like randomly picked it up. It wasn't like it was her axe into it. She loved it. I know. I'm so glad it wasn't something embarrassing, like her own bra or like whatever would be kind of palliating. Yeah. Like like strong underwear. I don't know what it would be that would actually kill somebody. At least an ax is kind of scary, right?

[01:04:06]

Yeah, totally. Totally. No, I mean it. OK, hung next to her head so that her death probably would have been forgotten. Right. Except you art history majors should fucking know this. A certain painter was in was interested in her death. So your dude, Rembrandt.

[01:04:27]

Your friend. Congratulations on Rembrandt, by the way. And then pretty much all of us. Yeah.

[01:04:33]

A lot of them are from around here. 16, 64. So Rembrandts almost 60 years old at this point. He didn't go to the public execution, but later that same day. By the time she had been hung up, he rose his boat from his modest house on Rosen grokked.

[01:04:52]

Thank you to the bold Wyk.

[01:04:56]

Full check. V o l. W i j k. Wait. They're stoned. The meatball city. And so he's he fucking row row rows his boat over there. Sure. And he fucking like sees her up there and he like sketches. Two drawings of her. Oh it's one and one up close in one profile. And they're so fucking creepy and like there's so much feeling in them even then they're just like basic sketches. It's her. Her face shows a look of disbelief and resignation.

[01:05:33]

It's just this sad look on her face that you can just tell what it's what it says, even just with this basic drawing.

[01:05:39]

He was good. I mean, pretty good. It's officially known the work is efficient or as a woman hanging on, give it. And at this point in his life, he had already buried two of his wives. One recently from the plague and three children. And he was in financial strait and like he wasn't fucking doing well. Even Rembrandt didn't do well.

[01:05:58]

You guys fucking don't feel bad. Don't feel bad.

[01:06:05]

There's so many Rembrandts in this audience tonight. It's going to be fine in 100 years. Yeah.

[01:06:13]

So he wasn't the only artist who drew something from him. There's also a pen and ink drawing with watercolor by Anthony Van Balsam and which her body was seen hanging alongside other criminals at an execution site. So remembrance is special because it's just her, you know, as the subject. But his this is kind of interesting looking. It looks it's like what you would fucking see back then, which is a lot of dead bodies. So back then back then, it was drawn recently.

[01:06:41]

People were trying to identify the date of the. The sketch of Rembrandts. And they were like at sixteen sixty five. All these like nobut all art. People were like, I know what year it's from. But because it was one of his rare drawings that he drew of a current event that could then place it because of her back to 16, 64. So. So in their face.

[01:07:05]

Yeah. But. OK, so Tom Freston, an artist based in Oxford, said this about the case. The law courts had obviously felt that a public hanging would act as a deterrent, but from its punishment such as this, that we should be deterred. I can't help but see an irony in the fact that her surname is Christians, for it was a Christian society that preached forgiveness but was happy to sanction and support the barbaric acts of cruel punishment.

[01:07:33]

She is without a victim of a system whose crimes hanging an impoverished 18 year old girl went far, were far worse. And both of Rembrandt's drawings of this, this event are at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. And that's the murderer. Elsia. Christian.

[01:08:00]

Do we have time for a hotel? Let's do it. All right, listen to that were either some. Oh, my God, you guys, there have been so many great hoedown down murders during this tour. It's been so awesome. So you probably know this Ifill's of the podcast. We'll just tell you really quickly. You don't seem like a super drunk audience or stoned, but if you're under the influence in any way, that's fine with us.

[01:08:23]

As long as you can tell your own story coherently and follow it all the way through. That's key. It needs to have a beginning in a middle and an end. And not just tonight, but any time you tell a story. Please don't be one of those people that just fucking starts shit and then wanders off. It's very irritating. Let's see. We want it to be local. We would love for it to be from Amsterdam proper. But like, again, we don't want to hear from Veck in Arizona and no way to and just make it quick, because if you get picked, all the people that didn't get picked hate your guts.

[01:09:00]

And now Georgia will put her special picking there since our tour manager.

[01:09:05]

OK. Can I have the lights up? Anyone have a look at this? Am I going to have to be the only person with her hand? Why? You you had your hand up. Go to Vince. This site. You got it. All right. Nice. We love running.

[01:09:31]

Yay! OK.

[01:09:34]

Don't yell the lights down or she'll show up there, too. Hi, guys. Great to see you. She's got her career. She's got our jacket on to turn around. Look at that. Oh, my God. So awesome.

[01:09:59]

Oh, yeah. Yeah. Where are you from? Touching on it. I'm actually from Canada. OK, wait, wait. OK. I live in Switzerland. OK. Yeah. I work for the U.N.. And then I found out you were touring. And so I was like, oh, let's go to Amsterdam. What's your hometown? My hometown is Winnipeg, Manitoba. OK. She just doesn't give a fuck about the rules. No, but OK.

[01:10:31]

I lived all over Canada. My dad is APHC. So you go where the contract is. And I, I had a crush on a boy who is now in prison for murder. For hire. Oh yes. OK, what happens. So I was in the seventh and eighth grade in Ontario and his name was Dennis. And so we used to walk home together. And so I ended up moving around a lot as a child. And then about 10 years ago, a dear friend named Katie emailed me and says, hey, do you remember Dennis?

[01:11:06]

Yes, I do. And she's like, she's in a prison for murder.

[01:11:12]

And I'm like, Oh. And so, yeah, she unfortunately got involved in a murder for hire case in Kitchener, Ontario, and he currently is in appeals. What did he do? So there is a woman who is married to him. I, I don't know the woman. I don't know the man. But he was apparent she was apparently married to a man who didn't want to be married to her anymore. And he hired two people, one of them being this boy.

[01:11:45]

Did he do it currently in the Canadian court system there in appeals as to who held the gun? No. So he did it. He did? Yeah.

[01:11:53]

Tatyana, everybody gets. Well, that's in Amsterdam. That was our show, Gary Amsterdam. We can't believe that we are so frickin lucky that we got to come here to our city and to Europe in general for this podcast that we started in my living room with cats everywhere. So thank you guys so much for making that happen. Also, thank you guys for becoming your own community. That's kind of the coolest thing that we keep watching and hearing about and seeing is the listeners of this show have now become Murda Renaults and the Mercurio's have started communities all throughout the world and with each other.

[01:12:42]

And so often we do meet and greets at our show. We have people come up and say they have extreme anxiety. They've never gone anywhere by themselves. And they come to our show by themselves. And then they meet friends at the shows.

[01:12:55]

And that is. We also have people telling us they've gone back to college to become forensic pathologist. Logical investigators. There are people that come up. There is a girl in a woman in London who came and showed us her acceptance, her college acceptance letters to two different colleges because she was going to study forensics and she had already dropped out of college and thought she would never finish. And she decided after listening to this podcast that she was going to go back.

[01:13:27]

An issue here. Is that where you're pointing or no? Oh, I thought somebody was like it and she's here today.

[01:13:35]

But it's just like it's just so funny.

[01:13:38]

It's it's a personal conversation George and I started having two years ago that we thought we'd record to see if anybody else cared about it. And all the sudden, all this other amazing stuff is happening and we get the credit for it. It's so amazing. So thank you so much for being here. For being so awesome, for being so supportive. We can't thank you enough. And please stay sexy. And don't.