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[00:00:01]

You're listening to Comedy Central. Hey, everybody, welcome to The Daily Social Distancing Show. I'm Trevor Noah. It is Thursday, the twenty third of July. And as you can see, although some people have gone back to the office, I'm still here filming the show from my apartment because, you see, I paid for the business edition of Zoome and God dammit, I'm going to get my money's worth anyway. On tonight's episode, the Spanish Flu is back.

[00:00:26]

Desi line checks in on her Uncle Rudy. And America gets its first racist president. So let's do this, people.

[00:00:34]

Welcome to the daily social distancing show from Trivers Koch in New York City to your couch somewhere in the world. This is the daily social decency joke with Trevor Noah. Here's a.

[00:00:49]

Let's kick things off with Corona virus. The only thing living its best life in 2020. Over the past 24 hours, multiple states, including Texas and Florida, reported record covered 19 fatalities. And for everyone who is asking what America is doing wrong. Well, one viral photo might offer a clue.

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A tale of two countries. This picture is going viral for highlighting the difference in Koven 19 responses between the United States and Canada. At the top of your screen, a packed American tour boat at Niagara Falls carrying hundreds of people. You can see them in blue ponchos. The bottom is a Canadian one carrying just a half dozen tourists. They are the ones in red. The images show the two vessels passing each other earlier this month.

[00:01:34]

Yep. Apparently, while Canadian boats at Niagara Falls have a passenger limit of six people. American boats are just balling out. I mean, just look at how all of those Americans are packed together on that boat. I'm not even sure if that's missed from the waterfall. That could just be everyone coughing. Look, obviously, I'm joking. All right? Those people might be safe because they're outdoors in the mist and the wind. I don't know. But still, this photo really is a metaphor for how differently the U.S. is treating this pandemic from all other countries.

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I mean, of all the things to risk dying for, looking at a waterfall is the worst choice until there's a vaccine. Stick to the rivers and the lakes that you're used to. I will say, though, I also feel like Canada is being a little too safe. I mean, come on, you guys are free health care, live and let go. And by the way, keeping boats from being overcrowded isn't the only thing Canada is doing to stop the spread of Corona.

[00:02:27]

The CDC and the Canadian province of British Columbia just released official health guidelines telling Canadians to try using glory holes for safer sex because they say the wool stops you from breathing on each other, but the hole keeps the magic happening. And if ever there was a sign this is how, you know, coronavirus is really bad when doctors are like, OK, go stick your dick in a wall. It'll save lives. Now, look, I don't know about glory holes, but my personal advice is if you want to be real safe.

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Everyone needs to have sex the same way Mike Pence does. What you do is you go in the bedroom first and then you lock the door behind you so nobody else can come in sex. Oh, and while we're on the subject, here's another tip. Guys, wear a mask over your balls. OK, it doesn't stop the virus. It's just no one wants to see a bull's eye like the bottom of a cupcake. The parties on top just hide that stuff.

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In other news. Football is coming back. But the Washington Redskins are not effective immediately.

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The former Washington Redskins will now be called the Washington football team as they continue to look for a replacement mascot. According to ESPN, this is not the final name of the team, but they needed something in place before games begin this season. A new permanent name and logo is still in the works.

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I'm sorry. That is the laziest team name I have ever heard. I mean, they renamed a professional football franchise the same way you say phone numbers of people you just met. Karaoke dude with the big is who sings strange woman from the bar idiot co-worker. Let me change that idiot co-worker Michael Costa for real guys, the Washington football team.

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It doesn't sound like a professional organization. It sounds like they ran out of cash and now they can only afford to store brand version of team names. It's like when my mom couldn't buy us Cheerios, so instead she bought us own circles. Circles. Eat this in the morning. The only silver lining I can see for this name is that it's going to be very helpful to people who don't follow the NFL. Yeah, because now when someone asks you who you're rooting for, you can be like the football team.

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And then you sound like you know what you're talking about. Oh, interesting choice. You're going with the football team. Yeah, I like that when they do the bowl. But let's move on now to some news that's really out of this world. It's about space here this morning.

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It's an historic space race to Mars, the red planet. China launched its first ever mission to Mars this morning. A six wheeled robot lifted off on the long March five rocket from the island south of China's mainland. Details were top secret. China's not even releasing the rover's name. It should get there in orbit sometime in February. Right behind the rover Hope launched by the United Arab Emirates. That was on Monday. The U.S. expecting to launch its rover Perseverence from Cape Canaveral early next week.

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Can have a traffic jam up there.

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Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. Why is everybody trying to go to Mars? I mean, there's never been a movie on Mars that ends well. Best case scenario, you lose a ton of weight because you're on an old potato diet. Like, that's it. And also, is this the best time for space exploration? Come on, scientists. I know you want to have fun, but we need you focused on the pandemic. Now was not play time.

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No Mars until you finish your career. You finished your Corona scientists. You finished. And then you can have moss, don't you, look at me like that young scientist moving on to politics. Yesterday, we talked about how a Republican congressman named Ted Yoho called Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez a bitch in the halls of the Capitol building. Well, this morning, HLC fired back with both barrels.

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An extraordinary moment on the House floor just a few minutes ago. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez talking about Republican Congressman Ted Yoho. Joy. S slitted Zafrin.

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I was minding my own business, walking up the steps. And Representative Yoho put his finger in my face. He called me disgusting. He called me crazy. And in front of reporters, Representative Yoho called me and I quote, a king bitch.

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And I want to be clear that Representative Yoho's comments were not deeply hurtful or piercing to me because I have worked a working class job. I have waited tables in restaurants, I have ridden the subway. I have tossed men out of bars that have used language like Mr. Yoho's. Mr. Yoho mentioned that he has a wife and two daughters. I am someone's daughter, too. And I am here because I have to show my parents that I am their daughter and that they did not raise me to accept abuse from me.

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And, you know, I don't care what anybody says. I am glad AOC came out on the House floor and said exactly what that congressman said to her expletives and all, because if you only hear about the story on the news, you've probably heard them say that Yoho used a derogatory language or an offensive term or he made a decorum. Watch. See, AOC is absolutely right. Time and time again, powerful men hide behind the fact that they have daughters as a way to shield themselves from accusations of sexism.

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It's almost like these dudes are out there. Gender reveal party is like, yeah, it's pink. Oh, man, I'm finally going to have a political prop to excuse my bad behavior. This is the happiest day of my life. But enough about sex as politicians. Let's switch things up and talk about President Trump. For years now. Trump has been bragging about how he aced a dementia test that he took back in 2018. And now he's been bringing it up every chance he gets.

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He talks about it with Chris Wallace. He replaced the White House portrait of Abraham Lincoln with a drawing of that elephant. And in an interview with Fox News last night, Trump went to the greatest detail yet on the test that he says proves he's a stable genius.

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Then it was thirty or thirty five questions. The first questions are very easy. The last questions are much more difficult, like a memory question. It's like you'll go person, woman, man, camera, TV show. They say, Could you repeat it? So I said, Yeah. So it's person. Woman, man. Camera. TV, ok. That's very good. If you get it in order, you get extra points if you're OK.

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Now he's asking you other questions. Other questions. And then ten minutes. Fifteen, twenty minutes later. So remember the first question, not the first, but the tenth question. Give us that again. Can you do that again? And you go. Person, woman. Man. Camera. TV. If you get it in order, you get extra points. They should. Nobody gets it. No, it's actually not that easy. But for me it was easy.

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They say that's amazing. How did you do that? I do it because I have like a good memory, because I'm cognitively there.

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Donald Trump is the only person who can talk about a cognitive test but make me feel like I have brain damage. He's gone from bragging about his historic Electoral College win to boasting that he can solve the puzzle in a Happy Meal. In fact, I almost feel like obsessing over a dementia test that you took two years ago is the real dementia test. Also, can we all agree that Trump is just naming things that he sees in front of him, like in that moment?

[00:10:06]

That's what he's doing. Person. Women and men. Camera, TV. I mean, anyone can be like any. You're a genius. And you can do that. Anyone can do it. Camera chair, bookshelf, dead body TV. I'm a genius. Now do what makes it even stranger. That Trump keeps bragging about his score on this test is that the neurologist who created the test told The Washington Post, quote, It's not meant to measure IQ or intellectual skill in any way.

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If someone performs well, what it means is they can be ruled out for cognitive impairment that comes with diseases like Alzheimer's, strokes or multiple sclerosis. That's it. So you see, acing this test doesn't make. Trump a genius. It just makes him a guy who's desperate for an accomplishment. Now, one reason Trump keeps bringing up this test is that he thinks it's shows that he's more mentally shop than Joe Biden. But yesterday, Joe Biden said the real issue isn't what's in Trump's brain.

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It's what's inside his heart.

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Joe Biden tonight calling out Mr. Trump as the country's first racist president.

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We've have racists and they've existed. They tried to get elected. President is the first one that has.

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That's what he told a worker who expressed concern that the president blames China for the corona virus pandemic.

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All right. All right. I understand the point. Biden was trying to make. But Donald Trump is obviously not the first racist American president because Biden calling Trump the first racist president, is calling LeBron the first black NBA player. I mean, he may be the best right now, but there were a lot before him. Don't get me wrong. It was extremely racist when Trump wouldn't let black people live at his properties. But those early presidents wouldn't let black people not live at their properties.

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In fact, just to summarize some of what we know of American presence. Twelve of them owned slaves. So right off the bat. That's right. Woodrow Wilson openly supported the Klan. FDR from Japanese Americans in internment camps. LBJ routinely used the N-word in private. Nixon used racial slurs against pretty much every race and religion imaginable. Reagan called African leaders monkeys were uncomfortable wearing shoes. And that's just the shit that we know about. I mean, I don't know who this guy is, but look at Bill's mutton chops.

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He was probably racist, like racist hairstyle. You know, the thing when you choose from the list. Which one do you want? I want that one. Racist. Yeah. Hell, yeah. So, look, Biden was clearly wrong about this. In fact, he was so wrong that with our help, Trump has now turned his gaffe into a new attack ad. Gaffe machine. Joe Biden is at it again, claiming that Donald Trump is the first racist president.

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He's the first one. The first one for one.

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But the truth is, Donald Trump is just one of many racist presidents. In fact, historically speaking, very few presidents weren't racist.

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And one of them was black. So this November, vote for Donald Trump, the only candidate racist enough to be president. I'm Donald Trump and I approve this message. Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV. Whoo!

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Devastating. OK, we have to take a quick break. But when we come back, we'll tell you about America's new pastime, reenacting the Spanish flu.

[00:13:25]

Stick around. The Daily Show and the following message is brought to you by Hello Fresh. When life gets busy, often one of the first things to go is your energy to shop for groceries. That's where Hello Fresh comes in. With so many recipes to choose from. Hello. Fresh can help anyone break out of the recipe rut. That's why the busy producers and staff at The Daily Show love hello fresh because it's so flexible that there's something to make everyone in your house happy, whether you need vegetarian, family friendly or low calorie meals.

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[00:14:26]

Go to Hello Fresh ICOM Slashed Daily Show A-T and use Kote Daily Show 80 to get a total of eighty dollars off, including free shipping on your first box. Additional restrictions apply. Please visit. Hello, fresh dot.com. For more details. Welcome back to the Daily Social Distancing Show. It's no secret that America is struggling with the Corona virus, and part of the reason is that hardly anyone alive has ever seen a pandemic like this before. In fact, to find the closest one, you have to go back over a hundred years.

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The nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Foushee, says this current pandemic may match the horror of 1918 flu epidemic.

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This is a pandemic of historic proportions, I think. We can't deny that fact. It's something that I think when history looks back on, it will be comparable to what we saw in in 1918.

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Yes. To find something similar to Corona. You have to go back to 1918. That's way back back before they even invented smiling. Would you like to try smiling? This is a picture I know to something crazy. No, you're right. It won't work. But what has America learned since the 1918 Spanish flu? Well, it turns out not a lot, as we'll see in another installment of if you don't know now you know. The Spanish flu of 1918 had a lot in common with the Corona virus in 2020.

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It infected millions around the globe. It spread easily through the air, through coughs and sneezes. And for most of it, we were wiping our butts with old newspapers. But the real similarities between these two pandemics isn't how American society responded. For example, in both eras, the pandemic spread even further.

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Thanks to the mismanagement of the federal government since the start of the rhinovirus pandemic, Mr. Trump has downplayed the severity of the problem as cases surge around the country.

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Woodrow Wilson during World War One tried to minimize the Spanish flu epidemic.

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Woodrow Wilson pretended it wasn't happening and did not let people know how to protect themselves.

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The president's effectively discarding the existing advice from his government, his own public health experts. Woodrow Wilson encouraged public events. He told mayors and governors to have military parades despite public warnings against mass gatherings.

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President Trump is encouraging thousands of people to gather for a fireworks display.

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You had national public health leaders saying such things as this is ordinary influenza by another name. View this the same as the flu.

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Surgeon general, said Robert. Precautions are taken. You have no cause for alarm.

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There's no reason to panic at all. It's going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle it will disappear.

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Trump is making all the same mistakes that Woodrow Wilson once made. I mean, I know we said we wanted to be more presidential, but not that presidents. Sometimes it seems like Trump is a Frankenstein, but made up of only the worst parts of all previous presidents. You know, he's got the pandemic response of Woodrow Wilson. The racism of Andrew Jackson. The horniness of Bill Clinton. The vocabulary of George W. Bush. And it's all stuffed into Taft's body.

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Now, in both 1918 and today, the lack of leadership created a vacuum that allowed misinformation and dangerous cures to be spread as fast as the virus itself as the grown up virus continues to spread worldwide.

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The misinformation is spreading to.

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Donald Trump is pushing the debunked conspiracy. The Corona virus was man made in a lab in China.

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The pandemic spread benefited from misinformation. People began blaming the Germans, claiming they were spreading poison clouds, or that Bayer, which was a German owned company, had infected their aspirin.

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The president offers snake oil treatments that have the potential to do more harm than good. The president suggested Americans could inject themselves with disinfectants to ward off Kova 19.

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The disinfectant, if not set out in a minute, snake oil salesman had a field day.

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Dick's Dapo Rap also advertised itself as a remedy for the flu, claiming to stimulate the mucous membranes to throw off the germs.

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There were plenty of ads touting medicines, tablets and the use of disinfectants.

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People back in the day was so dumb. They thought you could spread flu through aspirin. I mean, everyone knows that diseases are spread through five g o why you turn on airplane mode? I'll be honest, I actually admire conspiracy theories specked them because they didn't have YouTube to spread their ideas, which means to get people to believe the stuff they had to go door to door today.

[00:19:14]

Now, Rockefeller are inventing a flu vaccine. Will record your thoughts to hear more. Please like and subscribe. I'll return here again in a few days, if you like what I have to say. I recommend my friend. I tell you why the earth really flat. By the way.

[00:19:29]

I'm willing to bet money that that Viks conspiracy was actually started by an African dad because they tried to fix everything with Viks. Daddy, I'm sad. Can I get a hug? You don't need a hug from me. You know what you need? You need to put some Vicks on your chest. It will warm up your heart. OK. Now go away. And here's the thing. What we saw in 1918 and we're seeing again today is that the lack of trust in leadership doesn't just cause the wrong treatments to spread.

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It also makes it much harder for the right treatments to spread.

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Cities recommended facemasks, though many residents didn't take that suggestion seriously.

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Despite the alarming spike, many people still refuse to wear masks and mask.

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A mandate followed. But not everyone complied. Masks are mandated here. Not everyone likes to get. One woman declared the ordinance, quote, absolutely unconstitutional. They say that it interferes with their personal liberty and it's unconstitutional, the anti mass sentiment actually coalesced into something organized.

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Thousands protested mandatory masking measures.

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Are you going to allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? You know, it's bad enough that people today don't want to wear masks. But why wouldn't people in 1918 wear mosques? I mean, the past smelled like shit all the time. Forget the flu. I would have worn a mask just not to smell the horse crap in the prewriting. Want to be old. I also wish that I could tell the anti Moss people today that mosques actually helped bring an end to the Spanish flu.

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But knowing some of these haters, they'd be like, oh yeah.

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But if masks work so well, then how come everyone who lived through that period is dead now? I will say it is depressing that it's been 100 years and mosques are still our best invention for stopping a pandemic. Because, I mean, if someone traveled in a time machine from 1918, they'd get here like I've traveled into the future. Pray tell, what ways can you stop a virus? Do you have nose lasers? No, we've got a mask.

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It's still a mask. Yes, but now it's blue. So the sad truth is, so far, America has repeated all the mistakes with Corona that it made during the Spanish flu. And if Americans don't do the very un-American thing of learning from history, then 20/20 will be bound to repeat the worst of 1918, the second wave.

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Backlash from business owners pressured cities to reopen as cities eased guidelines. Some were hit with a second wave of the flu. St. Louis, Birmingham and Omaha saw an increase in cases after lifting closures.

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Denver reopens on November 10th, with all restrictions on distancing lifted. Thousands flocked to the streets for an Armistice Day celebration. No more than 10 days later. Signs that the city opened back up too soon became clear as the death toll rises again in San Francisco.

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When the cases went almost down to zero, the city said, let's open up the city. Let's have a great big parade. We'll all take off our masks together because of that event. Two months later, the great influenza came back worrying.

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Yeah, that's something we all have to keep in mind. The lesson of 1918 is that bringing crowds back too soon will bring the virus back. So as much as I hate to say it, we actually need to get Trump reelected. Yeah, because if there's anyone who knows how to keep a crowd size down, it's him. So that's where we are. It's clear that nothing has really changed since 1918 except for the fact that now our clothing shows off our butts.

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And just like with the Spanish flu. America has ignored the spread of Koban 19 until it was too late. And even now, America isn't taking the steps needed to flatten the curve. But remember, it's not too late to learn from history. So America put on a mask socially distance because the way things are going right now. By the time 21, 20 comes around, they won't be anyone left to learn from our mistakes. When we come back, Desi, like, we'll check in on her uncle Rudy Giuliani.

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Stick around.

[00:23:28]

Welcome back to the Daily Social Distancing Show. You know, in these Korona times, everyone is keeping in touch with their relatives with zun calls, and that includes our very own Desie. Like now, a few weeks ago, we were shocked to learn that one of desis distant relatives is Fox News anchor Jeanine Pirro. And now we also just found out that Desie is also related to Rudy Giuliani, which is insane. Yeah, he's her uncle on her second cousins, married side, thrice divorced.

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So just this week, as he checked in with Uncle Rudy to see how he's holding up during the pandemic.

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Hey, Uncle Rudy, I saw a deformed potato in the store and it reminded me that I hadn't checked in with you in a while. You were you doing okay with the whole pandemic and everything?

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Not doing as well now. Oh, I'm sorry to hear that. All right. Are you staying busy? Yeah, I found it really helpful to stick to a schedule like a daily agenda. Interesting. Yeah.

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It's actually been George Soros set out on his own agenda. Uncle Rudy, can we please not do the George Soros stuff again?

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It's a Marxist agenda. An anarchist agenda. It's not talk.

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Politics is played by Black Lives Matter. It's funded by Soros to the tune of 30 or 40 million dollars.

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Wait. I'm sorry. Black Lives Matter and George Soros. What? What exactly?

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They want your property. They want the government to control it, but they do want one preferred class. And that's the people who are going to war. They're gonna get like a lifetime's salary.

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That does not make any sense to me.

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Black people will get that and they'll also get to choose a property that they want. And that's to reparations for for slavery.

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Uncle Rudy. That's not how reparations work. What are you even talking about this Marxist terrorist inspired document?

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Please, let's talk about something else. I'm I'm thinking about painting the kid's room a different color, like a like a fine yellow or something.

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What about all the people that do all the crazy painting on walls and stuff like that? The graffiti people. Yeah, that's an interesting idea. I think I'm probably just gonna do it myself. Anything else new? Have you guys seen Hamilton yet?

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I don't want a group that hates white people, that hates America, that has been organized by Marxists and funded by terrorists. I don't want that seen by my children.

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Cheesus, everything tracks back to Marxism with you. I bet if I said the word Puppis, the first words that would come into your mind are communism, Marxism, socialism.

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See?

[00:26:04]

Exactly. All right. I really I got to go because I am pretty behind on some stuff. Maybe we'll talk again sometime.

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We have got to get together. We have to be together. I could take you to Philadelphia or the St. Louis or Minneapolis.

[00:26:20]

Oh, I'm not really doing planes right now, but yeah, I would love to go to St. Louis with you when things calm down a bit. I'm just I'm I'm super busy right now, so I'm anxious. By the way, you couldn't help yourself.

[00:26:33]

OK. Talk again in a month. By. Wow. You're a great niece, Daisy. After the break, I'll be speaking to renowned therapist Esther Perel, and she'll help you figure out how not to break up during Corona virus. Yeah, I'm talking to you.

[00:26:51]

Stay tuned. Welcome back to the very social licensing show. Earlier today, I spoke with Esther Perel, psychotherapist, author and host of the hit podcast. Where should we begin? We talked about dating and counseling couples during the pandemic. So if you're a couple and you're in the pandemic, this is for you. That's the parole. Welcome to the Daily Social Distancing Show.

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Thank you. I am so socially distant from you right now as well.

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The name Esther Parole people think of the books like Mating in Captivity. People think of the TED talks. People know you as somebody who talks about the complexities of dating in the modern world. But now the modern world is a completely different world. And so I'm sure as a therapist who talks to so many different couples, you've seen what coronavirus has done to relationships. So let's start with the with the most basic thing. Has Coronavirus been good or bad for people's relationships?

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There's only two options, right? People sometimes either complained about being too close, too much together, 24/7 on top of each other and wanting more air. Or people have longed for more connection, more closeness, more contact because they've been too far apart. So on some level, in extremes, people have either felt too much or too little. That's one thing I would say that's really fundamentally changed at this moment. But basically, when you have a pandemic, when you have a disaster, it intensifies everything and it functions as a relationship accelerator.

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What it means is that you have a sense of uncertainty. You don't know where we going. We still don't know where we're going. There's a prolonged sense of uncertainty. There's a deep unknown. And as a result, there is also a sense of mortality that is hovering over you. So people are saying life is short and life is short. You start to push all the supercilious overboard. And you've honed in on the essential and the priorities. And you basically say, what am I waiting for?

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Hence, let's get married, let's have babies, let's move. Or I've waited long enough. I've been here. I'm out of here. And I know from some trust disasters that it's often a proliferation of babies and divorces, that flu pandemics. Wow.

[00:29:10]

A proliferation of babies and divorces. What are what are we to think of coronavirus and its effect on us as human beings on your podcast was really interesting because you spoke to couples in quarantine. What have you found as some of the things that have helped couples? And what are some of the things that hinder couples who either have to spend all their time together? All this to all the time apart.

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So, you know, what I looked at in where should we begin? Was exactly that. What add to the acute stressors that directly influenced the way that the couples are either getting along or not getting along at this moment. What happens when you have a complete overhaul of the rules? One person doesn't have his job or her job. In this case, in the Sicilian couple in where should we begin? The man loses his job. She works as a dula in the hospital.

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She has to go every day. She has the three young children. And the entire structure of the family has changed overnight. In addition, they were kind of already leaving with a rather big rift between the two of them. And suddenly they find themselves turned into a whole different level of interdependence. So you have different coping styles and you have really a sense of exacerbation of our coping style. It's not negative perceived. What makes it good is when the complementarity exists between people.

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And one says, you know, you're good at this. I'm good at that. And these two are both necessary. What is not so helpful is when one person says to the other. My coping strategy is the right strategy. Why are you worried? Or the other one who says you're not taking enough precautions? That's the classic right at this moment. And each person thinks that there's the Met. The way they manage their fear is actually the right way of being in the world.

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I think what you said earlier on is something that we have to address considering what's been happening. And that's been the stresses, the stresses in the relationship, the tensions, the conflicts that have been exacerbated from America to South Africa to India to all over the globe. We've seen a dramatic rise in domestic abuse within relationships. Is this something that we attribute that to? Is it something that was always going to happen or does coronavirus make it happen? And then how do we deal with that in society?

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How do couples or even groups of people deal with this issue that's causing so many women to be domestically abused in a way that they weren't before and children?

[00:31:34]

But look, I think that what happens is that when in this instance, because it's not all domestic violence is on the side of men, sometimes we talk about 15 percent being on the side of women, but predominantly it's on the men's side. When you lose your job, when you can't provide what can you lose your status when you. When you feel worthless, when you have money worries. When the stress becomes acute, you have all the conditions, that kind of agony is the right conditions for domestic violence and violence against children.

[00:32:07]

It's been like this to us. And for some, sometimes the very fact that their partner can't protect themselves and can't go out exacerbates the power that they have over them. You're trapped with me. And if you really want to go out, go see what will happen to you. So what do we do? There's all kinds of things that societies have tried with apps, with codes where women can go to the supermarket and they can give the code and they can identify themselves as being vulnerable, as being in danger, as needing to be removed, as being able to go to the hospital.

[00:32:40]

There are systems that are trying to create safe places. But no, you don't just have the system in place before. So you want to try to make sure that people maintain as much as possible a job or have a sense of security. You want to take those exacerbates that are likely to help you strike.

[00:33:01]

You always talk about how, you know, we have multiple relationships with people, even if it is the same relationship as things change and we change, we move into different relationships. So as the world changes, do you think people should take a look, a restock of their relationship and what they're looking for and what they are currently in because they're living in a new world? Because someone may say, I wanted to be married, but not if it means the person is here 24 hours a day or I wanted to be, you know, more single and free, but not if it means that I'm alone 24 hours a day.

[00:33:32]

Is this the time for people to take stock? Or is it not the time because it's coronavirus?

[00:33:36]

I think that people are taking stuff no matter what people realize. I didn't mean to be the person we went. We quarantined together and I realized I could never have done this alone. I am so grateful for the presence of this other person. It goes all over the place. It also is the fact that at this moment, if you work at home, you also had all your roles at the same table on the same chair. You are the CEO or you are the worker and you are the parent and you are the teacher and you are the child up and you are the partner.

[00:34:06]

And you are the lover. I mean, there is no differentiation between you, Rose. And so that in itself is exhausting. That's part of what these boundaries are so important. We have unprecedented expectations of our relationships, both in the romantic sphere and in the work sphere. You know, secularization has made it so that we expect from our relationship, meaning belonging and community. It's like a whole village. And I think that in a moment like this, we know that mental health is deeply connected to social connection.

[00:34:41]

And that means that even if you can't see people, which is not necessarily the case, you can take walks with people. You can call them. You can no, it does not have to be on Zoome essentially. The important thing here is to not think that because you are confined with one person, it means that you are your whole life is with one person. Your life needs all the connections, if not more so. And in fact, people began at first to call people that they hadn't seen in years.

[00:35:06]

Just how are you what happened to you do into their memory lane, you know, and why do you stay connected socially and to be helpful to others when you're helpful to others, even your neighbors who you never met before, you actually feel less passive and less helpless in the face of this big unknown. And those two things are essential elements of mental health. It's really shouldn't be basically relational health.

[00:35:32]

Well, I could talk to you for hours on this, but I guess that's why you have the podcast. And that's why you have the books. Hopefully we'll have you back on again off the coronavirus to figure out how we we are tweek our relationships now that we're free again and we're seeing strangers in the street for the first time. Sure. Thank you so much for joining us on this.

[00:35:50]

So this is going to say bye to them. Well, that's our show for tonight. But before we go, I just want to remind you that America is facing a nationwide poll worker shortage. And that's because most poll workers are over 60 and coronavirus is still out there. So they cannot show up. But fewer poll workers means that there are fewer polling stations open. And that means there's gonna be longer lines. But not everybody can afford to wait.

[00:36:12]

Especially in communities of color. But now here's the good news. Most poll working is paid. Yeah, but paid. And in some states, you can be as young as 16 to work. Over the past two weeks, we've partnered with Power to the Polls to ask you to be a poll worker. And over forty thousand of you have already signed up. So thank you to every single one of you who are giving a time to save your granny and protect democracy.

[00:36:37]

Until next week. Stay safe out there. Wash your hands and I'll see you at the gloryhole. The Daily Show with Trevor Noah is a dish watch the Daily Show weeknights at 11:00 pm, 10:00 Central on Comedy Central and the Comedy Central, watchable episodes and videos at The Daily Show dot com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to The Daily Show on YouTube for exclusive content and more. This has been a Comedy Central podcast.