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[00:00:35]

So I want to remind everyone that our friend show friend Charles Barkley before the Blazers and Lakers series started, he said that if the Blazers won game one, they would win the series. Then right before that series started, he said if they won game one, they would sweep the series. And then after Portland won game one, he was wandering around the studio with a broom just playing around. He's very good at television, very good at being Charles Barkley saying sweep, sweep, sweep.

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And of course, the Lakers have won the next three games and taking control of that series. He also guaranteed that the Pacers would win game three of that series against the Miami Heat, guaranteed it. And my question to you guys is, outside of Charles Barkley and Stewart, is there a third person in the history of the media that is allowed to say things and they never stick to them when they're wrong, that it doesn't matter, that people just keep moving on?

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Is there a third person on that list anywhere that gets away with saying whatever they want and nobody comes back on the back end to remind them how wrong?

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Well, no one really gets away with it anymore because freezing cold takes holds everybody accountable. Stewart is in this wonderful space where no one takes him seriously. So you can't really hold him accountable. But Colin Cowherd gets a lot of stuff like epically wrong and they keep tabs on him. Francesa was another one and he would never admit he.

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But no, but I'm not talking. He's going the other way, Mike. I'm talking about people who get to continue being belove, like in the cases of Cowherd and Francesa. It's a source of great mockery that they're not self-aware enough to know how often we're wrong at this stupid game of predicting, you know, outcome.

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There are people who want Francesa to be wrong. They want Colin to be wrong. No one really cares if Charles is wrong. They just want to be entertained.

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They don't care whether you're wrong either now. And it's a fairly amazing place to occupy in the sports media where when you're right, we get to celebrate. Oh, how right you were, but you never get hit. You're like you've got an immunity about being wrong. I saw Barkley years ago at a hockey game and he gave me a big hug and he said, you have the best job in sports media. No one hold you accountable. And I said, you have the second best job in sports media.

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No. One hold you accountable.

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I can't think of a third person. And here's the thing. You say, well, no one takes so and so seriously what they do when they get mad, when they're fans of the other team that he's picking against. And they take Charles plenty seriously until they decide to remember that it's Charles and they don't have to take him seriously.

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I think you're dead on. It's a unique space in the media landscape, and he's absolutely beloved. I love that they're starting to call them championship. And now the Charles Barkley guarantees imaging is hilarious.

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Yes, that's the beauty of predicting everybody does it, no matter how outlandish the prediction is, if you get it right, you're a genius. If you get it wrong, it's like I I didn't really think the sixteen seed was going to beat the one. I just said that, you know, you can there are always internal disclaimers that you can throw out there. So it's a no lose situation. You know, if you make an outlandish prediction, you get to be a genius.

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If it happens to hit and if it doesn't, nobody really cares.

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Well, but here's what's funny about this. If you're sort of studying the entire media content landscape, OK, you may have noticed at ESPN that there's a cookie cutter feel to some of what it is that's happening around us in the radio lineup, men in jackets in their home talking about sports in a very serious way, even though Chipper Jones isn't at the game and we make him put on a jacket to call the game because it makes it seem more serious.

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What I would say to you is within this landscape, and I think there's a lesson here that we can't find a third guy. One is on the most popular studio show in the history of studio shows. The other one is on the most different sports radio show that has ever existed in sports radio. And no one else is doing it. The only reason those two things are allowed to be so is because everyone else is doing it a different way.

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If everyone we're doing it likes to God, he just be a fool, but instead is a genius.

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Thank you.

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If everyone were playing the court jester, we would be in a situation where our show would not be allowed to be different. But their show is considered the most different, at least in part because right in the middle of it, they've got championship.

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Chuck, who's never won a championship is Lee Corso, a possible third where people just don't really care. They care about the headgear he entertains. They don't care if he's right or wrong.

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Do that. That's an excellent one. No one no one cares if he's right or wrong. We just want to see what a funny head he can put on. All right. The way they three, they sort of alluded Herb alluded that College Gameday may actually still travel to campuses. I don't think fans are going to be allowed, but we're still going to get some. A semblance of our Saturday morning viewing experience that's going to be different to have those things happen with no fans.

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I do love that. We got to basically just chose, OK, the third most popular thing in the history of doing these ridiculous right is the guy, the mascot, the old guy mascot who literally puts on mascot heads because he's not taking himself so seriously. I just want you to step back from that, though, and notice it. The idea that it hasn't resulted in a proliferation in a copycat league like there are. I know many of you are complaining because your sports radio show has taken on the influences of this sports radio show, but doesn't doesn't do it exactly the same or there are people who are taking themselves very seriously while doing it.

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But I do think there's a change in general in the sports media landscape where the younger people are noticing, wait, I don't actually have to do this in a super serious way, that it's always been done where people are in buttoned up jackets with ties and they're doing a very stark sports show. This doesn't have to be taken that seriously.

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Yeah, and you're labeling guys that are extremely different, Chuck. Charles Barkley is different because there's no one like him. You can try to have fun, lighthearted people. We've seen ESPN take stabs at Lighthearted before having Michelle Beadle in a studio trying to be chummy. And it just doesn't come off the same way I've said about our radio show, Dan, I mean, the intellectual gasbag is out there. You can find Dan Libertador, you can pick them off trees.

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And when you get to this level, they're all pretty smart. Scott's is a different one.

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What do I care? I mean, honestly, I mean, what do I care for, right or wrong or why would I care about that?

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I picked the most outlandish things. Occasionally I get them right, as Greg pointed out earlier. And when I do, I look like a genius. And when I don't, no one cares or remembers.

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Well, but that's the reason when you say, why would I care? It's because you've been able to do it and stacked successes on top of each other most. You wouldn't have been able to do it. You didn't want to do it when you were thirty. In fact, you didn't like that. I was putting you in a position where we kept taking your credibility again and again and again. That was not something you liked at the beginning of us doing right.

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But now I have no choice because I have none left after seventeen years.

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But it's the biggest bet we've cashed. It is. I mean, Greg Codi, do you think you could exist doing this and not the role that he's doing it in, like, you know.

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No, I don't think the character is a beautiful one. It really is. And it's necessary. It's absolutely it's oxygen for what we're doing here because imagine we're eight people right now in Zoom. Imagine how boring it would be. Who's going to win? Bucks, heat. Oh, bucks and six bucks and five bucks and seven bucks and six. But hold on.

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I think we did that happen. Yeah, no, but I have the heat in one. I mean, we did just that. Yeah.

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If we're not disagreeing, there's no there's no dynamic to play with.

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I would I would say though, Greg, that you and Stu Gods, for as much as you're espousing this particular belief, I would say both of you struggle or have struggled at some point with the idea of giving up your credibility in exchange for being the court jester who entertains. Because you yourself have said the one thing you don't like about being on this show is that you don't get to show off your journalism credentials enough. That's a fact, or at least I feel that's a fact, but look, the trade off is is favorable to me.

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I get that. But, you know, anybody who wants to hear another side of me either reads me in print or goes to my podcast. But I'm perfectly happy with what I convey on this show because it's it's me as well.

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As the salaries started to go up and up, I started to care less and less. I think there's a new look. I think Chris Coady has potential because I always said, hey, I ain't going to do this forever. There needs to be the next two gods. And I think Chris Coady is trying to carve out that that little you've been trying explain that you've been trying to talk Billy into it and Billy fights you because he wants to be beloved in the Marlins clubhouse.

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You don't pay me enough to take all the fun. You're right. Listen, I'm just an idiot, and you guys are getting older. You're not going to be around forever. So at a certain point, I try to decide, hey, listen, many, many carjacks ago.

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It was very difficult to do. Now it is just it's a breeze. All right.

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Well, hold on a second. Let's backtrack for a second, because I have felt the underlying tension. You guys tell me if I'm wrong because I don't see the machinations in the details, the granular stuff. Has Billy gone more corporate on us? Has he realized that we're aging and shrinking and that maybe he needs to align himself a little bit closer to ESPN the way Alison has? Because this is a sinking ship filled with rats that are all going to drown at sea?

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No, no, no, no, no. Billy's realize that burning every bridge that you cross is not the way to do business. That's what Billy's realized.

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All right. And we're getting going. Let's be honest. I mean, if we were to do something, you wouldn't be thinking that way.

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Be a little different, maybe. Explain to me what's been happening behind the scenes that I haven't seen where Chris has taken on the role. Okay, I'll try to be gods, but I'll also be scared all the time that I'm bothering my employers and Billy, who's like, nope, never going to be Østergaard. Not interested. Where's the corporate lamed?

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I just say stupid stuff like it.

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I don't think it's an activity. I just like sliding out. How do I become Strugatsky just as a shopping cart.

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I just I go for the joke. I if I think it's funny, I'll go for it. Why? What's the word.

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I see what is happening there is actually just that Chris is two gods and so it's not hard for him to play the role of the gods because he's just being his own self. Whereas Billy is saying, no, no, no, no, wait a minute, I can play the character of the gods, but I am not gods in real.

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Jesus carved out his own lane and there is no one like Billy on media. And it's probably the right call to your point, Billy. I mean, it's not exactly hard to see what's going on here considering our show just got short.

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Hold on, Billy. So are you beloved in Bristol? Are you somebody who is just when you say you don't want to burn every bridge as God runs, you know, throws lighter fluid all all over everything. And I'm running around.

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I mean, they skipped over the WS and what the Zubaan investigates, the guy likes to go out like everybody else. That's a start. That's that's not me.

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That's not who plays the game, plays the game play. Well, I'm Dan, I'm telling you, I don't think anyone's ever played the game better than I played the game. I mean. Well, that's interesting. Well, it don't play the game back. Well, I was just going to say I actually play terrible.

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Like, is there a worst clamoring to build a show around you two years from now? Like, do you have the relationships up there that build something because you've burned every bridge for them?

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I burned a bridge for totally your fault. What did. I'm guilty by association. Are you kidding me?

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I've still got this problem is two guys playing the game with everyone. So everyone thinks two guys is not playing the game. With that I go with you.

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I could not be chummy here to our bosses. I go in there, pat on the back. I give him a hug, I walk out. I feel like they hate me just because I'm associated with you.

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Well, why does Keyshawn Johnson have the relationship he has with you now where you're giving him all sorts of radio savvy advice, like how did that happen? Is it because you mean Uncle K? You just side with anybody who gets any power and all of a sudden you're flirting with them and then blaming me for being the jerk?

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You know, I mean, perhaps USC is one of the schools that Rachel's thinking about. I don't know. Oh, yes, several reasons.

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And the crazy part is, is you don't even have a guy like you don't even have to play the game for. So you got like you don't even have to be really have a lot of power to first. You got to play the game with you. So you got to do with anybody. I remember we had the auction winners come in and you guys is like in a corner with everybody. Give me your number. I can say, like, we can talk.

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It's like they're like this. This is no benefit to you, but like that just plays that game with everybody.

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So you got just a guy that shows up to a public basketball court by himself just waiting for a pickup game. He'll play with anyone and anybody.

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Yeah, yeah. He's the radio process. He just keeps collecting lottery tickets and not unlike. A Sixers he just keeps taking out. You've heard me for a long time around here saying there is nothing that the public of consumers in media enjoy more from the media and there's nothing that the media enjoys more covering with zeal than the hypocrisy of famous people. Can you catch the anti-gay preacher in a gay massage situation, in which case right now, right in front of you, I bring you the Falwell's.

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I don't know if you guys are paying any attention to this, but I can't believe two things. One, their sexual escapades involve an actual Miami pool boy. They found him at the fountain blue at 20 years old. But that's not quite enough. His name is Giancarlo Granda. How South Florida is that, how south Florida is that a poor be a pool boy, that, yes, I will have sex with your wife and you can watch why?

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Because it's South Florida.

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Allegedly, there is a sports side to. I mean, he runs Liberty University, which is the university that Humphries was coaching from a hospital bed for.

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Well, it does explain some of the sort of dilution of principles that has to be put in place in order for you freeze to be again, as Mike Ryan said, coaching a game. I believe they scored zero points. Right. They were shut out as he coached.

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Remember the result? I remember a thumbs up from my husband, but I think I the thing that I remember is the idea that said Syracuse, not only did he go to extreme lengths, look, one of the great lines in Greg Coatis journalism history was we were at we were in Chicago and Chicago. The Bulls of Michael Jordan were up three on the Miami Heat. And Phil Jackson had gone to his graduation graduation of one of his kids by helicopter and rushed back by helicopter to get there for game four.

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And Greg Cody said, never has a man rushed more to a place he was needed less than Phil Jackson just did with Michael Jordan's bulls. And the idea that they put that they put you freeze in a coaching box in a hospital bed, I think part of it that makes it so funny, it's not just the thumbs up, but that they didn't score in the game. So whatever it is that he was doing wasn't helpful in any way. Twenty four, nothing serious.

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The cashed.

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Thank you for the sports time, Mike. The ever flimsy sports tie of Liberty Sports.

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I saw a verified Twitter account say that. So there was an announcement that Falwell was stepping down and then another account like, well, no, Falwell doesn't necessarily agree with that. So I think there's going to be a fight over some money now. Well, let's let's rewind for a second.

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If you're not following any of this story, the Falwell name in America is known for being a religious name. If we are doing word association with Falwell, it's one of the first names that's going to come up when you go back to the day, the glory day, never mind. But for Joel Osteen of televised religion being a cable property that had some money behind it, where this is where the Falwell family fortune is built and the situation that they find themselves in is.

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This guy apparently parties allegedly all over Miami, pre pre pandemic, and he was just caught on his boat with his pants undone, taking a photograph with a woman, which is the place that all of this started, where he's in hot water and everything else. And it seems clear that this 20 year old John Carlo Granda again, I will say that again and again because it sounds like a made up name, a 20 year old poor boy from the fountain blue.

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It seems clear that he was going to do this interview with Reuters.

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If I saw this on Law and Order, I'd be like lazy. That's right. Yeah. Easy, right. John Karl just unveiled this point from the fountain balloon boy from Miami named Giancarlo Granda. Like you guys are out of ideas.

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That's correct. And so what ends up happening here? That is fairly amazing and not surprising because it is hard to deal with these kind of calamities. I thought David Letterman handled it better than just about anybody where he smoked out, the person who was trying to extort him before they could get to him. And Falwell went to that playbook. But it doesn't seem sincere. They're saying that there was a business arrangement on a hostile. They purchased the property together, which means that couple was getting some good sex, allegedly.

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Now, allegedly, allegedly, allegedly, a bunch of couples are coming out like, oh, yeah, the Falwell's. We swung with them.

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We swung with them. But not only do we swing with them. They gave Jean Carlo property, allegedly, they allowed him to run a hostel while allegedly having sex with Falwell's wife while he watched in a corner. But what the four walls have done because Reuters came out with this information today, right before Reuters came out with this information, Falwell went to The Washington Examiner and said, hey, this is a business relationship gone wrong. He's trying to extort us.

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I'm going to admit to the infidelity part of this. But I think the shame part of this is not actually as large with just the infidelity as it is. Oh, wait, you're not just the guy who's not faithful to your marriage, allegedly. You're also the guy who likes to watch his wife have sex with others. Like that's an added layer of shame to them.

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Yeah. Which I mean, sort of just throws by the wayside the whole faithful thing, because if you're to believe these reports, then they had an arrangement. This was an understanding. So it's not like someone's unfaithful and that you freeze game.

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There was no traditional handshake, like you couldn't do it. But do you know, Barbours did point to him up in the press box where he was sitting. The visuals on this are absolutely amazing.

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They are great, as I imagine were the visuals on whatever it is that they stand accused of doing right now. I imagine those visuals. Well, it would stand to reason that Falwell himself found those visuals to be amazing, allegedly. So, Cody, what do you have for us on this front?

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Well, first of all, I love the job title pool boy. It just transfers me. And I wonder at some point, do you graduate and become a pool man? Because at 20 it's OK to be a pool boy. But if you're a forty three year old guy, do you still have to go through life IDing yourself as a pool boy? That's the weird thing to me. But the other thing is we love irony, right? So when when God's disciple is acting ungodly, that's a bigger story.

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When the fire chiefs house burns down, that's a bigger story. And the Falwell's have always had a dubious name, right? I mean, his dad was a controversial man who not everybody loved. So it's just a it's a very American story in a way.

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I want to address that. But first, let's address Greg Coatis question of at what age do you stop being a poor boy? Mm hmm. Can women be poor boys? No, you graduate the pool man or you just off the job question, I wanted to hear you tell them what women can do or not.

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I want to explain to the audience here the unique positioning of the South Florida pool boys. Man one of them.

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Our whole pandemic situation is probably because Gillham couldn't win and then got caught with a boy toy and meth, allegedly.

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I believe it traces back to to Wolfhound, but. Sure.

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Well, he lost I don't think that that was, you know, patient zero. No.

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Well, Guillam did not lose the gubernatorial race because of the incident involving meth and a boy toy. You're a grammar expert. I've never gotten why it's called gubernatorial. It should be gubernatorial. We don't call him the governor of Florida.

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Greg, can you help us? Here you are. You are absolutely the wordsmith among us. Can you help us? The difference between how would you like it pronounced instead of good.

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But I think there was only one governor and that was Arnold Schwarzenegger in California. It is an odd twist where we call him a governor and then it becomes gubernatorial, becomes clear knowing I'm a governor.

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You know, Governor DeSanto. No, I have no answer there.

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OK, very good. So I've noticed that in general, nobody wants a part of this particular subject matter. Greg is making poor boy jokes and Ostergaard is doing is looking at hospital photos of him freeze. Does anyone want to help me with the subject matter that I'm dealing with here? Do you guys want to just sit it out?

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I mean, I don't know enough about the story outside of what's already been reported. I think this is a good one to wait and sit back and watch and see. Free's tried to address the team pregame speech from the press box, but he had technical issues it could communicate.

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I feel like the way to end this segment would have been with Mike Ryan saying it's a good one to watch and see. Roy, before the Colorado Avalanche doing going up to zero in a game against the Dallas stars, don't they know better?

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Four goals in 10 minutes. You want to poke the bear, the bear you don't want to poke.

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These Dallas stars have been telling you chip on their shoulder and test them.

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I'm looking forward to the next stars Western Conference finals. Me too. Me to put the kids to bed. I love these Dallas stars.

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Yeah. You watching, Dan? Don't piss them off. I'm telling you right now. Well, the stars wrong team to piss off. I've been saying that all year long. Team to piss off. So the islanders warning you every time you see on the lower third on the bottom line that Dallas stars score. Just remember who told you from day one.

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I mean, Roy, back me up here. One of the underrated coaches in sports history is Barry Trotz. I mean, absolutely.

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He was great in Nashville and Austin is great in New York.

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I want to come up in Washington. No one else was able to do it. And then he left and he's on the verge of winning the cup in New York. The islanders right out loud.

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Tell him I some intel on on the word gubernatorial.

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If anybody wants it, go, just go for it. Now, it's apparently it's from the word governor is from the Latin root word Guba, Mayor Jubi Mary.

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I'm hoping that we air all of these last 90 seconds and we'll just keep the show rolling right now from here, I wanted to ask you guys about what Roger Goodell had to say on Emanuel.

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Is it? How do you pronounce his name?

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Joe. Joe Acho.

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Yeah, it has a name in it.

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OK, forgive me for not knowing. I don't mean it's weird because it's just one letter removed from your favorite food.

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I thought it was odd, Joe. I like I like to have nachos and orders of Okot.

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I did not know it was Acho regardless. Forgive me for not knowing his name. I didn't mean disrespectful.

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Acho has an incredible agent. Incredible. What a glow up for Emmanuel. Acho started going on the late night talk show circuit just as his contract was coming up. I mean, time perfectly. And he's a resonating voice now for Roger Goodell to do that.

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Well, it's been interesting to see. I remember having a conversation with Colin Cowherd, who gets a scalp massage as part of his controversial coffee is brought to him before. And he was just sort of explaining to me what his work schedule is like and how the Fox people, whoever it is that works over there, that they're treated like the NBA stars and how ESPN people are more like the NFL, where we're a little more disposable, whereas FOX tends to accentuate the stardom of its individuals and have them doing things like the late night talk show circuit, even though what Mike is saying, there is absolutely a tribute to his agent.

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But what I wanted to ask you guys is Goodell was on his podcast and Goodell said that he wished he had listened to Colin Kaepernick when it happened. What are your thoughts there, Stewart? Because I feel like we're in an interesting position where I want to extend to anybody learning through new information, a certain leeway, an ability to learn and realize what their mistakes were. But when you've been an active part of the problem is the power structure, I'm less inclined to listen to anything you had to say because you had choices to make here.

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And you choose getting yourself a raise. You choose not admitting any of this until after the collusion settlement has run its course. Like it's just so much easier to do it now than it was to do it when there was money involved, when you had to run against your owners, when you had to use the power in the structure and you didn't use it, even though ostensibly you were the one with power. He is at the forefront of why this happened.

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And now he's sort of saying, hey, my bad when I think it needs to be accentuated. Hey, you're the reason this happened, that if your league hadn't gone so strident in terms of making it seem punitive, if anyone knelt, you're the reason this happened.

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And so saying now that you should have listened better, like, what were you doing before your naturally you wonder if his change, if if he's listening now and be more open to it is a matter of convenience. The problem with doing that, Dan, is a lot of people made that mistake. Players made that mistake. Teammates of Colin Kaepernick made that mistake. And so how do you advance forward? How is their progress if we're going to continuously look backwards at what someone did at the time team and maybe not give someone credit for actually deciding, hey, you know what, this time I'm going to list.

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All right. And maybe it is a matter of convenience. And certainly you're you know, you're entitled to think that.

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But if he's changed, he's change. If he's willing to listen, that's a good thing. He's the head of the NFL. He's the commissioner of the NFL. And I think that's progress. The fact that he's willing to listen and change and what he did and what he said on The Today show was done unbeknownst to any of the owners, they had no idea that he was going to do.

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It's not enough progress. And again, you say his teammates didn't stand up. There was pressure from above. I know two guys, which is part of the problem that that Roger Goodell was instrumental in creating the pressure that prevented anyone from standing up and leading with Colin Kaepernick when the money was involved.

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I know, but do we want to spend our time looking backwards and saying who didn't do the right thing at the right time or do we want to try to win?

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He's doing an interview where he's saying, I blew it. Yeah, well, he did. But then eventually we got you got to trust him and say and he's being said, well, I don't know. I mean, maybe you're only willing to do that very quickly.

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I'm not. When you were an instrumental part of the problem at the top of the food chain in terms of reasons this happened.

[00:29:25]

I know. But again, are we going to sit here and look back at everyone who was wrong or we could try to advance this thing forward? I mean, I think that's that's the difficult and tricky part. And all of it is easier to your point, man, but that doesn't make it easy. And everything that you're saying Roger Goodell is saying, right. Is saying himself like he's an. Fitting that he was indeed part of the problem we should have listen, this is an admission, a very public admission.

[00:29:50]

So I don't know what else there is to do with Roger Goodell other than take him at his word and see how he builds from this. I'm very curious to hear Greg's thoughts on the matter. I don't give Goodell much credit for saying, oops, three years too late, I do give him a little bit of credit in the better late than never category.

[00:30:07]

But keep in mind, what Kaepernick did and what that course did was demonized from the White House on down. And Goodell just didn't have the nerve to go up against the White House and all of a sudden have his league demonized. Finally, his hand was forced by all this just as social justice cry we're seeing in the streets. But better, better late than never is the best I can say for Goodell, which isn't much.

[00:30:37]

Also, sports changing doesn't really allow us to know how unpopular this is. Remember, it was all good inside the bubble. And then FC Dallas plays a game and they're booed into the point that they have to say in the locker room now for the national anthem footballs base. This is still a very polarizing position. And when you start letting fans in like the Miami Dolphins are, those fans are going to make their voice heard, Greg. Yeah, they are.

[00:31:01]

And they're free to do that. But it's such a polarizing thing. And that was the whole point of kneeling during the national anthem. Kaepernick meant it to be polarizing, to get people's attention, slap people in the face. As recently as a month ago, Drew Brees is likening kneeling to disrespecting the flag in the military. And then he had to play the regrette card and say, no, I shouldn't have said that because I know better and blah, blah, blah.

[00:31:26]

So to this day, four years later, whatever it's been, we're still at odds over what that means, what it really means, and what is being falsely portrayed as the hand is for part is the tricky part to kind of get through.

[00:31:40]

I'm not saying for certain people your hand wasn't forced, but it also diminishes certain people who have just decided, you know what, my hand wasn't forced. I just want to listen now, OK? I want to be a better person.

[00:31:51]

This is why I bring skepticism and cynicism to all of these things. OK, because as Abraham Lincoln has said, real leadership risks, unpopularity. And as it relates to this particular decision, anything you decide is going to be unpopular because it's polarizing. You choose either side. So I place in front of you this and I want to know the difference when you come at me with better late than never. The Washington football team, the roots of why it is they changed everything.

[00:32:21]

Why do you think it happened? Because I think the roots matter. I think it matters when your employees have gotten so strong with their voices that now they too are attacking you with a video that's made from inside NFL headquarters. I think the roots matter if you're willing to apply skepticism to why did Washington just decide, oh, now we're going to change our name? Why did they decide that? Because the pressure became so strong that it's not about an act of nobility.

[00:32:50]

It's about the consumer forcing you to do it. It's about your employees finally finding the strength to force you to do it. For Roger Goodell to continue down the path of enforcing what it is that they were enforcing is to go against Patrick Mahomes publicly. How could he? This is not an act of nobility. It's an act of covering your butt one on one, because you have to because the pressure became so strong and the pressure you were applying that you had to surrender, you had to quit because your own employees were forcing you into an anarchy state.

[00:33:24]

So it's a matter of convenience. I mean, if we're going to do that with every single person, then no one is truly changing. They're not doing it for the right reasons. They're only doing it because they've been forced. What's the reason I'm bringing this up to Gates is because when you go from stridently in the other direction, I'm totally folding your hand. I'm going to question your sincerity. It might be about learning, it might be about changing, or it might be about corporate, but covering.

[00:33:49]

It's all that, and it's not an apology, they wrecked that man's career for no reason and it's very unfortunate they really need to apologize to Colin.

[00:33:58]

Well, Goodell did apologize. His first comments on this were an apology, but I'm not sure an apology is fixing much of anything. I don't think Colin Kaepernick is saying to himself, OK, there I will take from that apology something that I can do with because it's not a job. It's not a it's not the ability to get out there and do something in that sport. But I'm allowed I can look at these as the individual cases where I know the Redskins as an organization, the Washington football team, their hand was forced.

[00:34:31]

Yeah. Daniel Snyder just a year or two ago saying there's no way I'll never do this. All right. I can look at Roger Goodell and as an individual and perhaps see a man who three years ago, as he gets older with perspective, might say to himself, you know what, I was wrong. I didn't listen. I should have done a better job.

[00:34:51]

Perhaps now he's trying to better himself as he gets older. I mean, there are different scenarios.

[00:34:56]

I appreciate that point of view and I appreciate the cynicism. Maybe I'm not saying that's the case. I don't I don't I don't know what to believe just yet. But if we are painting out a scenario, I'm curious to know from Dan like what Roger Goodell has to do to maybe sway him, that he is indeed changing. Because if we're painting out an ideal scenario, there's a public apology. There is a circuit involved. There is a sort of head in the hands on a bended knee.

[00:35:21]

I'm very sorry. And Roger Goodell is doing that. So I'm very curious to know what else he has to do to convince you.

[00:35:27]

And he's doing he's done two things here without the knowledge of the owners. He did not ask their permission. He works for them. What was that video from the basement? The other one was the interview I just did.

[00:35:37]

I now I'll be a cynic. I have my doubts that Roger Goodell is doing without NFL on. Well, this is what I would say to you, OK?

[00:35:47]

And I think if you've been listening to this show for a long time, I think one of the things that makes me unpopular, polarizing throughout the entire comment about sports that I have made my entire life is that I like to extend compassion and empathy and forgiveness to human beings for making human mistakes. The problem with this particular thing reminds me when I was willing to Gotze. Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Skinner at a Riley Cooper, Riley Cooper excuse me, I confused him with the Wake Forest quarterback Riley Cooper at a country Western concert as noon starts.

[00:36:30]

Oh, boy.

[00:36:31]

AP Sports, the breakdown said the N-word at a country music concert and then apologized for it profusely. And I was like, yeah, that apology seemed sincere to me. And Bomani was like, no, don't accept it. Some things are that kind of unforgivable. And using your power to get yourself a pay raise when you were in charge to not say any of this stuff while you were in court with a collusion case, but only to say it after it's been settled and to be a part of the power structure that profited off of that with f you money as a corporation because you didn't have the courage to fight the White House.

[00:37:11]

Some things are just kind of unforgivable now if you want to forgive them, because you want to extend Roger Goodell, mercenary businessman, every human compassion and empathy that is well within your right. But I am going to continue to apply cynicism to every Jazy hire or everything he does until you show me something that represents actual change instead of just words that are so convenient. Now that this is the easiest time in the world for you to be a follower instead of a leader.

[00:37:40]

But what is the change? Because I say that this is the start of that very change. So what do you need to see from him?

[00:37:47]

It might be the start of that very change, right? Giving ten years. Two hundred and fifty million dollars is a substantive thing that can also be viewed with cynicism. If you compare it to the amount of money made, I am going to apply because I've gotten four years worth of unforgivable, about four years worth of cynicism on the change before I see structural changes that make me believe that this tool about face of yours is anything other than advertising to please whatever it is of your employee base and your consumers.

[00:38:19]

And it shows just a general spinelessness. That is not something that people who play that sport tend to have. You crush those people by being their employer, by having the power and the money to do what it is that they wanted to do. You have to go the apology tour for about four years because it's about how you buried Colin Kaepernick for four years.