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The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Odessa Part 2: Friday Night Lights

The Daily

  • 160 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 45:49

In 1988, a high school football team in Odessa, Texas, was so good that it had the power to lift an entire city out of its depression, making Odessa the setting of the television series “Friday Night Lights.” And in the decades since, as West Texas has weathered the nauseating undulations of the oil industry, football has remained steady.So when the pandemic hit, the town did what it could to make sure the season stayed on. And at Odessa High School, where the football team struggles to compete against local rivals, that meant ensuring that their award-winning marching band could keep playing.In part two of Odessa, we follow what happened when the season opened — and how the school weighed the risks to students’ physical and mental health.

Odessa, Part 2: Friday Night Lights

The Daily

  • 290 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 48:13

In 1988, a high school football team in Odessa, Texas, was so good that it had the power to lift an entire city out of its depression, making Odessa the setting of the television series “Friday Night Lights.” And in the decades since, as West Texas has weathered the nauseating undulations of the oil industry, football has remained steady.So when the pandemic hit, the town did what it could to make sure the season stayed on. And at Odessa High School, where the football team struggles to compete against local rivals, that meant ensuring that their award-winning marching band could keep playing.In part two of Odessa, we follow what happened when the season opened — and how the school weighed the risks to students’ physical and mental health.

Diana and Meghan

The Daily

  • 270 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 34:38

This episode contains references to suicide, self-harm and eating disorders.In 1995, Diana, Princess of Wales, made a decision that was unprecedented for a member of the British royal family: She sat down with the BBC to speak openly about the details of her life.On Sunday, her younger son, Prince Harry, and his wife, Meghan, told Oprah Winfrey of their own travails within the family.Today, we look at the similarities between these two interviews.Guest: Sarah Lyall, a writer at large for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: A quarter-century after Diana broke her silence about life among the British royals, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, did the same. Their stories were remarkably similar.The Sussexes have accused the royal family of failing to protect them, both emotionally and financially. Here’s what we learned from Meghan and Harry’s interview with Oprah Winfrey. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

‘I Thought I Was Going to Die’: A Capitol Police Officer Recounts Jan. 6

The Daily

  • 200 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 33:39

When Officer Harry Dunn reporter for work at the Capitol on the morning of Jan. 6, he expected a day of relatively normal protests. But the situation soon turned dangerous.Today, we talk with Officer Dunn about his experience fending off rioters during the storming of the Capitol.Guest: Officer Harry Dunn, a Capitol Police officer who was on duty during the storming of the Capitol. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: “Black officers fought a different battle” on Jan. 6, Officer Harry Dunn said. Here is what he saw and heard when rioters, including white supremacists, stormed the Capitol.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

A Safety Net for American Children

The Daily

  • 330 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 22:15

Even as recently as a year ago, even the most cleareyed analysts thought it was a long shot. But this week, a child tax credit is expected to be passed into law, as part of the economic stimulus bill.The child tax credit is an income guarantee for American families with children. It will provide a monthly check of up to $300 per child — no matter how many children.We look at why this provision is so revolutionary and what has changed in the policy landscape to allow its passage.  Guest: Jason DeParle, a senior writer for The New York Times and frequent contributor to The Times Magazine. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package moving through Congress advances an idea that Democrats have been nurturing for decades: establishing a guaranteed income for families with children.What’s in the stimulus bill? Here is a guide to where the money will be going. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

Biden's Dilemmas, Part 2: Children at the Border

The Daily

  • 180 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 25:14

The number of unaccompanied children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border is growing — and, with it, anxiety in the Biden administration.Newer concerns have mixed with longstanding ones to create a situation at the border that could become untenable.Today, in the second part of our series on what we’re learning about the Biden administration, we look at the president’s response to the growing number of minors at the border.Guest: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a homeland security correspondent based in Washington for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In recent months, hundreds of migrant families have been released into the United States by Border Patrol agents. Thousands more are hoping for a chance to enter under looser policies.President Biden is trying to untangle an interlocking web of Trump-era border restrictions, leading for now to disparate treatment of migrants and rampant confusion.The Biden administration has said it will shorten the detention of migrant families. Researchers say children can show symptoms of trauma after spending long periods in custody.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.