Logo

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

Master the best of what other people have already figured out. Learn more at https://fs.blog/podcast

#42 Atul Gawande: The Path to Perpetual Progress

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 290 views
  • about 3 years ago
  • 01:20:10

The world-renowned surgeon, writer, and researcher Atul Gawande shares powerful lessons about creating a culture of safe learning, the critical difference between a coach and a mentor, and how to ensure constant improvement in key areas of your personal and professional life. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#41 Tobi Lütke: The Trust Battery

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 590 views
  • about 3 years ago
  • 01:45:55

Today, I interview fellow Ottawan and the founder and CEO of Shopify, Tobi Lütke. In case you’re still new to the internet, Shopify is the largest ecommerce platform that allows people to easily set up online storefronts to sell everything from jewelry to surfing lessons. Shopify began as a simple two man operation selling snowboards online, but it became clear rather quickly that it had the potential to grow into much more. Now Shopify employs more than 4,000 people and supports more than 600,000 businesses online. It’s a remarkable story, with a remarkable leader at the helm. There was so much I wanted to talk to Tobi about that we hop around quite a bit. Here are a few of the topics we discuss: Tobi’s thoughts on how video games helped him prepare to run a company How selling snowboards online slowly transitioned to the creation of one of the biggest tech companies in the world Why Tobi intentionally headquartered Shopify outside of Silicon Valley and how that fits into his overall growth strategy One of the most underrated resources Tobi leans on to mine nuggets of wisdom when trying to get insight or solve a problem The hard and valuable lessons Tobi learned as they scaled from a 2 employee company to a 4,000 employee company What the “Tobi test” is, and how it helps Shopify team members become more adaptable, unified and prepared when things go haywire How employees use the “trust battery” and how it fosters better teamwork, communication, and productivity throughout the company The benefits of hiring employees in a “secondary market” as opposed to a “primary market” and how that contributes to the unique culture at Shopify Tobi’s decision-making process and his philosophy on making quick vs analytic decisions Tobi’s unusual morning routine that gets him in the right mindset to tackle the day His optimistic view of AI and machine learning and how they will impact the way we do things in the future And more… Whether you’re building a business of your own, want to create a more dynamic and unified culture at work, or just like hearing entrepreneur war stories, this episode will not disappoint. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#40 Ben Thompson: Thriving in a Digital World

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 320 views
  • about 3 years ago
  • 01:40:24

Today’s guest is Stratechery author and founder Ben Thompson. If you’re an investor in Silicon Valley, work at a tech start-up, or just love to geek out on technology and business analysis, odds are good that Stratechery is on your short list of must-read blogs. What started as a side project, quickly ballooned into one of the most influential tech blogs on the web. The New York Times called Stratechery, “one of the most interesting sources of analysis on any subject.” I agree. In this interview, Ben and I cover a lot of ground. Here are a few of the things we discuss: Learn once and for all how to pronounce Stratechery. :) How Ben’s business model was developed and how he massaged it over the years to become what it is today The one metric Ben looks at each day to gauge the health of his business How Ben deals with people who rip off his work and pass it off as their own Ben’s thoughts on pricing, free trials, content and other important aspects of online membership sites How Ben structures his day to churn out such incredible content so consistently How Ben handles being wrong on his site, and his process for screening his work for confirmation bias How the internet has changed the traditional view of supply and demand, and what companies should do about it What Ben would teach an MBA class about internet strategy (if you do any business online, you need to hear this) What it would take for a start-up to overtake Google or Apple, and the vulnerabilities that all companies share, no matter how big or profitable The new era of technology and how companies like Netflix, Airbnb, and Amazon are doing it right (and what you can do in your own business to take full advantage) This is one of the most jam-packed interviews I’ve done on the Knowledge Project. Ben’s answers are so thoughtful and informative that you’re going to want to have a notebook handy. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#39 Tyler Cowen: Thinking About Thinking

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 330 views
  • about 3 years ago
  • 56:40

There are only a handful of websites that I read religiously. One of those is MarginalRevolution.com, started by my next guest, Tyler Cowen. Other than hosting one of the most popular economic blogs in the world, Tyler is also an economics professor at George Mason University, a regular New York Times columnist, and the author of over a dozen books, including Average is Over, and The Complacent Class. With such a prolific guest, it’s no wonder that we cover a lot of ground. In this episode, we discuss: How the future of labor will look drastically different than it does today, and what we can do to future-proof our livelihood The pros and cons of virtual reality and the impact it could have on society The fate of newspapers and how information will be more and more “bundled” according to our tastes and preferences Race relations in the world, and how in many ways we’ve taken discouraging steps backwards How we’re losing touch with the physical world, and some of the symptoms that indicate that we could be in for a rough ride What Tyler suggests doing to improve decision making and how important (and rare) that skill will be in the coming years Tyler’s advice to parents about how to foster resilience, tenacity and internal drive in their children Tyler’s “quake books” and the reading process he’s developed over the years that keeps him sharp Why giving books as gifts can be dangerous The one skill every person should possess before Googling anything What playing competitive chess as a child taught Tyler about how he thinks and views the world today And much more, including Tyler’s thoughts on minimum wage, bitcoin, and his favorite television programs. If you want to upgrade your thinking so you’re prepared for the brave new world that’s rapidly developing before our eyes, you won’t want to miss this fascinating episode. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#37 Annie Duke: Getting Better by Being Wrong

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 400 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:56:31

I have wanted to do this interview for a long time. On this episode, I am thrilled to have Annie Duke, former professional poker player and author of the new book, Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts. Annie has a very interesting background that makes her uniquely qualified to speak about high-level decision making. As an author, speaker, world-class poker player, and academic in the fields of psychology and cognitive theory, Annie understands the intersection of luck, skill, and making decisions in uncertain, chaotic environments better than most people on the planet. This is a whirlwind of an episode, and we cover all kinds of fascinating topics, including: The strange circumstances that shifted Annie’s path from finishing a Ph.D. in linguistics to becoming a professional poker player What it was like to be a female poker player in a predominantly male sport (especially before poker had become socially acceptable) What drew Annie into such a high stakes, time-pressured environment and why she felt like poker was the perfect fit for her How her graduate work in psychology informed the way she approached the game of poker — and helped her rack up wins How she finds the signal in a very noisy stream of feedback The big mistakes Annie noticed other players making that were stalling their progress in the game but allowed her to make giant leaps forward The role that mental models played in her learning process (and which models Annie liked to lean on the most in a high stakes game) The power of surrounding yourself with people that can help you expand your circle of competence — and how that made all the difference in Annie’s development as a player Confirmatory and exploratory thought, and how one helps us to be “accurate” and one helps us to be “right.” The secret pact you should be making with the people who are closest to you And so much more. This episode is just under two hours long, but there’s no fat in it. Annie delivers a masterclass in making the smartest decisions we can, even when our hubris insists otherwise. Do some finger stretches before hitting play, because you’re going to be taking some serious notes. Please enjoy the interview! *** GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#35 Robert Greene: Alive Time vs. Dead Time

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 330 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:17:32

In this episode of The Knowledge Project, I have the brilliant Robert Greene. Robert is the author of 5 New York Times bestsellers, including The 48 Laws of Power and The 33 Strategies of War. He's also written on mastery and seduction. Robert’s books have been somewhat controversial over the years and have been called amoral, cunning, and even ruthless for what they reveal. Yet millions of readers, from mid-level managers to hip-hop royalty and corporate executives have revered his work as a sort of canonized scripture for the ambitious. In this conversation, we cover a lot of ground, including: Why Robert believes his first book, 48 Laws of Power has continued to sell steadily for over two decades. What Robert calls “alive time” and “dead time” and how we can optimize each day to be filled with “alive time” and live the life we’re proud of The one skill that determines how far you’ll get in life, no matter how talented you are in anything else Robert’s research method and how he finds such unique and interesting examples What Robert looks for when he reads, and what qualities separate good books from excellent books How Robert developed his famous note card system to extract the meat out of anything he reads Why Robert insists on writing all his notes longhand even though it’s less convenient and less accessible than taking notes digitally What Robert’s daily routine looks like, particularly when he’s writing and researching for a new book What Robert considers to be the single greatest power any human has, and what we can do to strengthen it How having unfettered access to information is actually making us dumber in very important ways and what we can do about it How to fine tune your “bullshit detector” so you’re able to tell the difference between pretenders and performers. (As a bonus, Robert shares a few ways you can improve your bullshitting skills when it becomes necessary) And a lot more. Plus, Robert gives us a sneak peek into his newest project, The Laws of Human Nature, which explores the hidden motivations that drive what we do and say. This interview is packed to the brim with interesting and actionable insights that I think you’re going to love. Grab a pen, a notebook, and a glass of wine and enjoy! GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#34 Amelia Boone: Learning How to Suffer

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 300 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:09:10

Since the popularity of Obstacle Course Racing, or OCR, has exploded onto the scene, there has been one woman who has dominated the sport: Amelia Boone. Amelia ran her first race in 2011 after some prodding from a co-worker, and though she says she stumbled her way to an unimpressive finish, she was smitten. She has since amassed over  50 podiums and two dozen victories, including the Spartan Race World Championship in 2013, and the World's Toughest Mudder (three times!) in 2012, 2014 and 2015. Oh, and her 2014 victory came just eight weeks after major knee surgery. Though she vehemently denies it, Amelia is superhuman. This interview is a little different than others you may have heard on The Knowledge Project but no less fascinating. We cover a wide variety of topics including habits, reading, self-reliance, and training. Specifically, you’ll learn: Why Amelia was drawn to obstacle racing even though running was something she despised The complementary connection between her sport and her professional work and how racing has made her a more effective attorney How Amelia fights physical and mental fatigue when most people quit (she even shares a story of how she dealt with a vacant support station halfway through a 100 mile race) What she does to develop grit and resilience so she knows she can rely on herself when things get rough Amelia’s “to-do list” trick that makes sure she’s productive — you’ll want to steal this How a serious injury taught Amelia some of her most powerful lessons about who she is and what’s important to her What Amelia’s parents did to teach her to be self-sufficient from a very young age How she learned to deal with setbacks, and how careful she is with the language she uses when she speaks to herself when things go wrong Why Amelia runs with a Sharpie and the same playlist she’s listened to for the past 5 years How Amelia transformed herself from a casual weekend warrior to one of the most finely tuned athletes in the world Whether you’re an athlete, a weekend jogger, or the only exercise you get is the leisure stroll from the couch to the refrigerator, there are lots of insights and plenty of inspiration waiting for you in this interview. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#32 Patrick Collison: Earning Your Stripes

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 350 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:49:32

On this episode of the Knowledge Project Podcast, I chat with Patrick Collison, co-founder and CEO of the leading online payment processing company, Stripe. If you’ve purchased anything online recently, there’s a good chance that Stripe facilitated the transaction. What is now an organization with over a thousand employees and handling tens of billions of dollars of online purchases every year, began as a small side experiment while Patrick and his brother John were going to college.   During our conversation, Patrick shares the details of their unlikely journey and some of the hard-earned wisdom he picked up along the way. I hope you have something handy to write with because the nuggets per minute in this episode are off the charts. Patrick was so open and generous with his responses that I’m really excited for you to hear what he has to say. Here are just a few of the things we cover: The biggest (and most valuable) mistakes Patrick made in the early days of Stripe and how they helped him get better The characteristics that Patrick looks for in a new hire to fit and contribute to the Stripe company culture What compelled he and his brother to move forward with the early concept of Stripe, even though on paper it was doomed to fail from the start The gaps Patrick saw in the market that dozens of other processing companies were missing — and how he capitalized on them The lessons Patrick learned from scaling Stripe from two employees (he and his brother) to nearly 1,000 today How he evaluates the upsides and potential dangers of speculative positions within the company How his Irish upbringing influenced his ability to argue and disagree without taking offense (and how we can all be a little more “Irish”) The power of finding the right peer group in your social and professional circles and how impactful and influential it can be in determining where you end up. The 4 ways Patrick has modified his decision making process over the last 5 years and how it’s helped him develop as a person and as a business leader (this part alone is worth the listen) Patrick’s unique approach to books and how he chooses what he’s going to spend his time reading ...life in Silicon Valley, Baumol’s cost disease, and so, so much more. Patrick truly is one of the warmest, humblest and down to earth people I’ve had the pleasure to speak with and I thoroughly enjoyed our conversation together. I hope you will too! GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#31 Barbara Oakley: Learning How to Learn

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 470 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:33:38

Just when I start to think I’m using my time well and getting a lot done in my life, I meet someone like Barbara Oakley. Barbara is a true polymath. She was a captain in the U.S. Army, a Russian translator on Soviet trawlers, a radio operator in the South Pole, an engineer, university professor, researcher and the author of 8 books. Oh, and she is also the creator and instructor of Learning to Learn, the most popular Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) ever(!), with over one million enrolled students. In this fascinating interview, we cover many aspects of learning, including how to make it stick so we remember more and forget less, how to be more efficient so we learn more quickly, and how to remove that barriers that get in the way of effective learning. Specifically, Barbara covers: How she changed her brain from hating math and science to loving it so much she now teaches engineering to college students What neuroscience can tell us about how to learn more effectively The two modes of your brain and how that impacts what and how you learn Why backing off can sometimes be the best thing you can do when learning something new How to “chunk” your learning so new knowledge is woven into prior knowledge making it easily accessible The best ways to develop new patterns of learning in our brains How to practice a skill so you can blast through plateaus and improve more quickly Her favorite tactic for dealing with procrastination so you can spend more time learning The activities she recommends that rapidly increase neural connections like fertilizer on the brain Whether memorization has a place in learning anymore, or simply a barrier to true understanding The truth about “learning types” and how identifying as a visual or auditory learner might be setting yourself up for failure. ...and a whole lot more. If you want to be the most efficient learner you can be, and have more fun doing it, you won’t want to miss this discussion. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#30 Margaret Heffernan: Collaboration and Competition

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 300 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:16:38

Today, I’m joined by speaker, international executive and five-time author Margaret Heffernan. We discuss how to get the most out of our people, creating a thriving culture of trust and collaboration, and how to prevent potentially devastating “willful blindness.” GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#29 Dacher Keltner: Survival of the Kindest

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 330 views
  • over 3 years ago
  • 01:19:57

When Pixar was dreaming up the idea for Inside Out, a film that would explore the roiling emotions inside the head of a young girl, they needed guidance from an expert. So they called Dacher Keltner. Dacher is a psychologist at UC Berkeley who has dedicated his career to understanding how human emotion shapes the way we interact with the world, how we properly manage difficult or stressful situations, and ultimately, how we treat one another. In fact, he refers to emotions as the “language of social living.” The more fluent we are in this language, the happier and more meaningful our lives can be. We tackle a wide variety of topics in this conversation that I think you’ll really enjoy. You’ll learn: The three main drivers that determine your personal happiness and life satisfaction Simple things you can do everyday to jumpstart the “feel good” reward center of your brain The principle of “jen” and how we can use “high-jen behaviors” to bootstrap our own happiness How to have more positive influence in our homes, at work and in our communities. How to teach your kids to be more kind and empathetic in an increasingly self-centered world What you can do to stay grounded and humble if you are in a position of power or authority How to catch our own biases when we’re overly critical of another’s ideas (or overconfident in our own) And much more. We could have spent an hour discussing any one of these points alone, but there was so much I wanted to cover. I’m certain you’ll find this episode well worth your time. *** GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#28 Michael Mauboussin: A Decision Making Jedi

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 330 views
  • almost 4 years ago
  • 01:16:46

Michael Mauboussin returns for a fascinating encore interview on the Knowledge Project. We geek out on decision making, luck vs. skill, work life balance, and so much more. *** Michael Mauboussin is back as a returning guest on the Knowledge Project! He was actually the very first guest on the podcast when it was still very much an experiment. I enjoyed it so much, I decided to continue with the show. (If you missed his last interview, you can listen to it here, or if you’re a member of The Learning Community, you can download a transcript.) Michael is one of my very favorite people to talk to, and I couldn’t wait to pick up right where we left off. In this interview, Michael and I dive deep into some of the topics we care most about here at Farnam Street, including: The concept of “base rates” and how they can help us make far better decisions and avoid the pain and consequences of making poor choices. How to know where you land on the luck/skill continuum and why it matters Michael’s advice on creating a systematic decision-making process in your organization to improve outcomes. The two most important elements of any decision-making process How to train your intuition to be one of your most powerful assets instead of a dangerous liability The three tests Michael uses in his company to determine the health and financial stability of his environment Why “algorithm aversion” is creating such headaches in many organizations and how to help your teams overcome it, so you can make more rapid progress The most impactful books that he’s read since we last spoke, is reading habits, and the strategies he uses to get the most of every book The importance of sleep in Michael's’ life to make sure his body and mind are running at peak efficiency His greatest failures and what he learned from them How Michael and his wife raised their kids and the unique parenting style they adopted How Michael defines happiness and the decisions he makes to maximize the joy in his life Any one of those insights alone is worth a listen, so I think you’re really going to enjoy this interview. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#27 Chris Voss: The Art of Letting Other People Have Your Way

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 430 views
  • almost 4 years ago
  • 01:22:24

Negotiation expert Chris Voss teaches a masterclass on the art of negotiation. Chris is the former lead international kidnapping negotiator at the Federal Bureau of Investigation. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#26 Warren Berger: Improving The Questions You Ask

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 350 views
  • almost 4 years ago
  • 01:22:35

The quality of your outcome depends on the quality of your questions. Through asking the right questions we can spark innovation and creativity, gain deeper knowledge in the topics that are most important to us, and propel us forward in our personal and professional pursuits. Yet very few of us do it well — if we do it at all. My guest on the podcast today is Warren Berger — journalist, speaker, best selling author, and self-proclaimed questionologist. His insightful book A More Beautiful Question shows how the world’s leading innovators, education leaders, creative thinkers, and red-hot start-ups ask game-changing questions to nurture creativity, solve problems, and create new possibilities. In this episode, we discuss the importance of asking the right questions, why they’re critical to your success, and how you may be one great question away from a major breakthrough. You’ll also learn: How Warren manages the constant input and stimulation from online consumption when it’s time to create. The small habits that pack the biggest punch and make the most difference in Warren’s life What makes a question more or less effective How to create a culture where questions are welcome and encouraged Why answering all your kids’ questions may be doing them a disservice — and what to do instead What “collaborative inquiry” is and how to use it to get the most out of your teams in the workplace How Warren transformed one of his most painful failures into one of his most proud achievements Why Warren insists that everyone is creative, and what we can do to fan the flames of our own creativity If you think you could improve the quality (and frequency) of your questions to enhance key areas of your life, this is not a conversation you’ll want to miss. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#25 Gary Taubes: Is Sugar Slowly Killing Us

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 380 views
  • almost 4 years ago
  • 01:43:34

It seems that nowadays, aside from religion and politics, one of the most hotly debated topics is that of nutrition. Should we eat high carb diets? Low carb? High fat? High protein? What about wheat or gluten? Should we eat meat or adopt a vegan diet? There are as many opinions as there are people — and books, magazines and websites are overflowing with information showing you the “right” way to eat and exercise to lose weight. But if “eating less and moving more” is all it takes to lose weight and enjoy a healthy lifestyle, why are so many of us fat and getting fatter? In this episode, I chat with Gary Taubes, bestselling author of three books, The Case Against Sugar (2016), Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It (2011) and Good Calories, Bad Calories (2007). We talk about the sharp rise of obesity and diabetes in America, the structural hurdles to effective nutrition research, and explore the common myth that a calorie is just a calorie. Here are a few other things you’ll learn in this interview: How diets shifted in the last century, and what impact it’s having on our bodies today. Why a carb isn’t just a carb — and why you should know the difference Is the sugar industry the new Big Tobacco? What role genetics play in our health, and how much is under our control Why humans are so attracted to sugar and how to break the habit Gary’s suggestions to improve your health, drop body fat and feel terrific The benefits of fasting and how you can try it out yourself And a bunch more. If you think at all about your health, give this podcast a listen.  GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#23 Ray Dalio: Life Lessons from a Self-Made Billionaire

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 390 views
  • about 4 years ago
  • 01:31:25

Are you in love with your own ideas regardless of how good they are Would you like to make better decisions and fewer mistakes? Would you like to improve the most important relationships in your life? These are just some of the topics I discuss with my guest, Ray Dalio. Ray Dalio is the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, and is the author of the new book Principles: Life and Work. He is also a leading figure in the world of philanthropy, is an avid supporter of transcendental meditation, and has appeared on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people in the world. Ray gave me over an hour and a half of his time, and I didn’t waste a minute of it.  GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#22 Adam Grant: Givers, Takers, and the Resilient Mind

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 410 views
  • about 4 years ago
  • 01:27:42

Are you a giver or a taker? Have you ever struggled to find work/life balance? How do you build resilience in yourself, your team, or your children? I tackle these topics and many more in this interview with my special guest, Adam Grant. In this interview, we cover a lot, including: How to tell if you are a giver or a taker (Spoiler: if you just told yourself you’re a giver, you might be in for a rude awakening) How Adam filters down hundreds of ideas and opportunities to the select few he focuses on How to tell if your business idea is a winner or a huge waste of time Why “quick to start and slow to finish” is great advice for budding entrepreneurs How to nurture creativity and resilience in your children (or team culture) How to create positive competitive environments that bring out the best in people Adam’s two core family values and how he instills them in his children “Mental time travel” and how it can make you resilient to any challenge or obstacle Why “how can I be more productive” is the wrong question to ask (and what to ask instead) How Adam and I each address the topic of work/life balance And so much more. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#21 Ed Latimore: The Warrior Poet

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 290 views
  • about 4 years ago
  • 01:01:20

Ed Latimore (@EdLatimore) might be the most interesting person you'll ever meet. Ed is a professional heavyweight boxer, physics major, and philosopher. He's also the author of the cult-hit Not Caring What Other People Think Is a Superpower. If there's anything Ed feels like doing, he simply does it. This interview explores the physics of boxing, the value of a coach, and much of Ed’s hard-fought wisdom. You’ll discover: How the painful end to a relationship lit a fire under Ed that hasn’t stopped burning How Ed knows when he’s bitten off more than he can chew and needs to ease up on the accelerator Why motivation is a terrible way to achieve great things (and what to do instead) The unlikely way that Ed’s runaway best selling book came about Why Ed thinks every person should step into the boxing ring at least once in their life How people get stuck on the “dopamine treadmill” which feels productive but actually gets you nowhere (this is the kiss of death if you want to accomplish any important goal) Ed’s brilliant philosophy on pain and suffering that will change the way you view hardships in your life Ed’s somewhat controversial approach to coaching children and getting the very best out of them The most important element of creating a positive habit (most people get this wrong) And more. After listening to this warrior poet, you won’t look at life the same again. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  

#19 Rory Sutherland: The Psychology of Advertising

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 530 views
  • over 4 years ago
  • 01:56:13

In this info-packed and entertaining interview, Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman of Ogilvy & Mather, and I dive deep on advertising, persuasion, and why humans do some of the silly things we do. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/

#18 Naval Ravikant: The Angel Philosopher

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

  • 1.1K views
  • over 4 years ago
  • 02:01:20

Naval Ravikant is the CEO and co-founder of AngelList. He’s invested in more than 100 companies, including Uber, Twitter, Yammer, and many others. It’s difficult to nail down exactly what we discuss in our conversation because I had so many questions to ask him. Naval is an incredibly deep thinker who challenges the status quo on so many things. This is an interview you’ll want to listen to, think a bit, and then listen to again. Here are just a few of the many things we cover in this episode: What a “typical day” looks like (not the answer I expected, and not one you’ve likely heard before) How Naval developed his legendary reading habits and how he finds time to read no matter how busy life gets How the internet has impacted book reading (both good and bad) and how to make sure you’re getting the best information from the most reliable sources What popular habit advice Naval thinks is BS and why Naval’s habit stacking technique that helped him overcome a desire for alcohol and other potentially destructive habits How Naval’s core values give direction to his life and how those values developed over time Naval’s thoughts on the current education system and what we can do to facilitate better learning for our children Naval’s favorite mental models for making critical high-stakes decisions His brilliant two-factor calendar authentication concept to keep him focused on only the most important projects Naval’s definition for the meaning of life (buckle up for this one) His amazing response to the investor who wanted to be just like Steve Jobs And so, so much more. Just a heads up, this is the longest podcast I’ve ever done. While it felt like only thirty minutes, our conversation lasted over two hours! And although it is the longest, it’s also our most downloaded episode on the Knowledge Project, so make sure you have a pen and paper handy. There’s a lot of wisdom up for grabs here. Enjoy this amazing conversation. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/