Logo

ZOE Science & Nutrition

The world’s top scientists explain the latest health, nutrition, and gut health research and translate it into practical advice to improve your health & weight. Join ZOE Science & Nutrition, on a journey of scientific discovery.
Hosted by Jonathan Wolf.

The world's biggest intermittent fasting study - what we learned with Prof. Tim Spector & Gin Stephens

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 5 views
  • 2 days ago
  • 01:00:33

Did you know that intermittent fasting can have significant health benefits? By aligning your eating schedule with your body's natural rhythms, it can bolster heart health, enhance insulin sensitivity, and support weight loss.In today’s episode, Jonathan, Prof. Tim Spector, and Gin Stephens dive into the world of intermittent fasting, with a focus on time-restricted eating. Gin shares essential tips for beginners and explains what it takes to be successful. Tim explores the groundbreaking findings of The Big IF Study from 2022, the largest exploration of intermittent fasting to date. They also unpack controversies and describe who might want to avoid fasting.Gin Stephens is an intermittent fasting advocate, New York Times bestselling author, and podcast host. Gin has been living the intermittent fasting lifestyle since 2014.Follow Gin on Instagram.Tim Spector is a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, director of the Twins UK study, scientific co-founder of ZOE, and one of the world’s leading researchers. Follow Tim on Instagram.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Want ZOE Science & Nutrition’s top 10 tips for healthier living? Download our FREE guide.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Mentioned in today's episode:Flipping the metabolic switch: Understanding and applying the health benefits of fasting in ObesityThe Big IF Study Books by Gin Stephens:28-day Fast Start: Day By DayFast. Feast. Repeat. Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.

5 things you can do now to reduce dementia risk | Professor Claire Steves

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 67 views
  • 16 days ago
  • 53:22

How soon should we start taking our dementia risk seriously?In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Prof. Claire Steves to explore the multifaceted world of dementia. They delve into the significance of dental health, genetics, diet, and physical activity — plus, they unpack the latest research — to give you practical strategies for preventing dementia.Claire is a consultant physician in geriatric medicine at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. She’s also a senior clinical lecturer at King's College London and deputy clinical director of the institution’s Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology where she leads research on the characterization of physical and mental aging traits and frailty.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Get the FREE ZOE gut health guide — download hereFollow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction01:26 - Quickfire questions on dementia02:42 - Main discussion: understanding dementia04:18 - Control over fate with dementia06:52 - Why older people get more fractures08:32 - Warning signs of dementia09:55 - Unique aspects of dementia12:12 - Cellular level discussion on dementia15:49 - Risk factors for dementia16:07 - Inheritance and dementia18:29 - High-risk factors for dementia19:15 - Fetal development and dementia risk21:47 - Brain reserves and mental health24:24 - New advances in dementia treatment30:47 - Medications and life expectancy33:21 - Diet and dementia prevention35:58 - The role of physical activity39:45 - Oral health and dementia42:10 - Social interaction and brain health44:02 - Diabetes and dementia45:36 - Women, HRT, and dementia49:09 - Recap: Types of dementia53:39 - Hearing aids and dementia prevention55:39 - Episode sign-offStudies related to today’s episode:Brain-age is associated with progression to dementia in memory clinic patients from NeuroImage ClinicalFind our top 10 tips for healthier living: Download our FREE guide.Are you interested in a specific aspect of dementia? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.

5 things you can do now to reduce dementia risk with Professor Claire Steves

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 46 views
  • 16 days ago
  • 53:22

How soon should we start taking our dementia risk seriously?In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Prof. Claire Steves to explore the multifaceted world of dementia. They delve into the significance of dental health, genetics, diet, and physical activity — plus, they unpack the latest research — to give you practical strategies for preventing dementia.Claire is a consultant physician in geriatric medicine at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. She’s also a senior clinical lecturer at King's College London and deputy clinical director of the institution’s Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology where she leads research on the characterization of physical and mental aging traits and frailty.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Get the FREE ZOE gut health guide — download hereFollow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction01:26 - Quickfire questions on dementia02:42 - Main discussion: understanding dementia04:18 - Control over fate with dementia06:52 - Why older people get more fractures08:32 - Warning signs of dementia09:55 - Unique aspects of dementia12:12 - Cellular level discussion on dementia15:49 - Risk factors for dementia16:07 - Inheritance and dementia18:29 - High-risk factors for dementia19:15 - Fetal development and dementia risk21:47 - Brain reserves and mental health24:24 - New advances in dementia treatment30:47 - Medications and life expectancy33:21 - Diet and dementia prevention35:58 - The role of physical activity39:45 - Oral health and dementia42:10 - Social interaction and brain health44:02 - Diabetes and dementia45:36 - Women, HRT, and dementia49:09 - Recap: Types of dementia53:39 - Hearing aids and dementia prevention55:39 - Episode sign-offStudies related to today’s episode:Brain-age is associated with progression to dementia in memory clinic patients from NeuroImage ClinicalFind our top 10 tips for healthier living: Download our FREE guide.Are you interested in a specific aspect of dementia? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.

Three ways to prevent diabetes with Professor Naveed Sattar

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 66 views
  • 23 days ago
  • 54:35

In today’s episode, we’re talking about a disease so widespread that it touches nearly every family in some way: type 2 diabetes. It’s not just a health issue, it's a rapidly expanding crisis. And many people don’t know that they have it. In the U.S. alone, 100 million people have prediabetes, and more than 37 million have type 2 diabetes, a chronic condition with life-altering effects.Prof. Naveed Sattar joins us to shed light on preventing, treating, and potentially reversing type 2 diabetes. Naveed is a medical doctor and Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow. He’s one of the world’s top 1% most cited clinical scientists, and he’s worked on many clinical trials of lifestyle changes and drugs to prevent and manage diabetes. Learn your diabetes risk score:If you’re in the U.K. click here. If you’re in the U.S. click here. Get the FREE ZOE gut health guide — download hereFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction01:00 Topic introduction02:28 Quick fire questions05:33 What is blood sugar and why does it matter?07:15 What is insulin and what is its relation to blood sugar and diabetes?08:48 Why doesn't the body allow sugar to increase in the blood?10:45 What happens when somebody gets pre-diabetes or type 2?14:34 What is HBA1C?17:08 Why has there been such an increase in diabetes?23:05 How does muscle mass have any impact on diabetes?24:54 Are risks different between men and women?27:08 How does ethnicity come into this?31:04 What other personal risk factors are there?32:29 What are the symptoms of diabetes?33:53 When do these symptoms begin?35:09 What should you do if you have concerns?36:33 How to find out your own likelihood of risk38:34 How can we avoid getting diabetes?42:10 How can we combat genetic risk factors?44:26 Is it possible to lower blood sugar and reverse the effects of diabetes?47:18 What is the science behind the new drugs coming on the market?49:20 Summary53:39 OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Primary care-led weight management for remission of type 2 diabetes (DiRECT): An open-label, cluster-randomised trial in The LancetIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.

The truth about SIBO with Dr. Will Bulsiewicz

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 77 views
  • about 1 month ago
  • 26:46

Do you know what SIBO is and how it could be affecting your health?In today’s episode, Jonathan and Dr. Will Bulsiewicz dive into the world of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), a condition that may underlie common health issues ranging from irritable bowel syndrome to brain fog. Together, they tackle myths and share insights into SIBO diagnosis and treatment. Could rebalancing your gut microbiome be the answer you've been searching for?Dr. Will Bulsiewicz is board-certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology. He’s also a New York Times bestselling author. Dr. B has won multiple awards and distinctions for his work as a clinician. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.ZOE's FREE gut health guide - download it here.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes00:00   Introduction to SIBO01:01 What is SIBO?02:43 An overgrowth of bacteria03:41 SIBO Myth #1 debunked04:34 What is the link between SIBO and other diseases?06:12 What are the challenges with SIBO Testing06:48 Understanding testing methods07:08 Myth #2 debunked08:28 The issues with breath testing for SIBO11:38 What are the root causes of SIBO14:35 What is the impact of medication on SIBO?16:12 Dietary management and low FODMAP diet17:45 Probiotics and SIBO management18:00 Myth# 3 debunked19:55 VerdictMentioned in today’s episode: Fiber supplementation protects from antibiotic-induced gut microbiome dysbiosis by modulating gut redox potential from Nature CommunicationsOur earlier podcast on the low-FODMAP diet Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.

Fitness routines for menopause with Dr. Stacy Sims - exercise for every stage

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 64 views
  • about 1 month ago
  • 01:01:06

Are you navigating the twists and turns of perimenopause and beyond? Traditional exercise advice often misses the mark for women in this phase, mostly because its source is research focused on men. In today’s episode, we're joined by the acclaimed Dr. Stacy Sims, a leading expert on women's exercise science. Stacy delves into how menopause affects our exercise responses, and she offers strategies to adapt your fitness routine for optimal health during and after menopause.Ready to transform your approach to health and fitness? Tune in for expert insights and actionable tips.Dr. Stacy Sims is an exercise physiologist and nutrition scientist who researches exercise performance and nutrition with a focus on women’s health and performance. She holds a Ph.D. in exercise physiology and sports nutrition from the University of Otago, and she did a postdoc at Stanford, where she remains an adjunct faculty member. Stacy is also a research associate at the AUT Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand.Follow Dr. Stacy Sims on Instagram, and find her podcasts here. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram. Get the FREE ZOE gut health guide — download hereTimecodes:00:00     Introduction00:34     Quickfire questions03:39    Menopause and perimenopause explained08:23    What happens when oestrogen levels change?11:28    When does perimenopause start to happen?14:15    What is the role of exercise in menopause?17:00    What are hot flushes?20:20    How can exercise have a positive impact on menopause?21:57    What are the best exercises to do?25:20    You are NOT going to get bulky lifting weights!28:36    Alternatives to going to the gym    33:08    What is high-intensity training?41:32    What is the minimum exercise needed to have a positive health impact?47:27    How does fasted training affect women?51:36    SummaryMentioned in today’s episode:Hailey Happens FitnessLes MillsTrain with JoanAnd these books by Dr. Stacy Sims:Next Level RoarIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.

Coffee's hidden health benefits with James Hoffmann & Professor Tim Spector

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 92 views
  • about 1 month ago
  • 01:09:06

Many of us love coffee, but we may not be aware of its health benefits. If you thought coffee was just a caffeine kick, think again.In today's episode, Jonathan, Prof. Tim Spector, and coffee expert James Hoffmann explore the intricate relationship between coffee and health. They uncover truths and myths about caffeine and describe coffee’s fascinating role in improving gut health.Tim also shares exciting news about soon-to-be published research. The topic: coffee and the gut microbiome. Plus, James brews coffee live in the studio and helps us understand the different coffee variants. He even dives into the world of coffee kombucha.James Hoffmann is an English barista, YouTuber, entrepreneur, coffee consultant, and author. He came to prominence after winning the World Barista Championship in 2007 and is credited as a pioneer of Britain's third-wave coffee movement.Tim is a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, director of the Twins UK study, scientific co-founder of ZOE, and one of the world’s leading researchers. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Find top tips for gut health from ZOE Science and Nutrition — download our FREE gut guide. Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00    Introduction01:50    Quickfire Questions04:24    Why are we all so obsessed with coffee?05:02    What are the health benefits associated with coffee?    06:40    There is a lot more fiber in coffee than you think09:47    The effects of caffeine and gender differences12:31    Why is coffee full of polyphenols?15:12     Tim’s new research teaser21:21    What is the health relationship between fiber, microbes and our bodies?27:32    Should we all start drinking coffee and should we choose decaf?31:52    Modern coffee is all about flavor33:03    Does the way that we make coffee impact our health?37:55    James explains his mini laboratory!43:42    Why is coffee not regulated in coffee shop chains?44:35 What's the best way to make coffee?44:40    Coffee #1 Filter Coffee47:10    Coffee #2 Decaf Coffee51:00    Coffee #3 Instant Coffee1:00:50  How does caffeine affect high blood pressure?1:05:36  SummaryMentioned in today’s episode: How to Make the Best Coffee at Home by James HoffmanEditorial correction: James refers to chlorogenic acid as a polyphenol. We have since learnt that this is incorrect. Rather, it is a phenolic compound or a phenolic acid. James has shared this short video on his YouTube channel clarifying this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IszQ2JR3OlcIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.

Inflammation and your gut: Expert guidance to improve your health

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 190 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 01:00:25

Did you know that you can potentially extend your life by 10 years if you eat the right foods and that this is even possible if put into practice later in life? Inflammation is the cause of most diseases and illnesses, if you would like to learn how to reduce inflammation then look no further!In today’s episode, Prof. Tim Spector and Dr Will Bulsiewicz delve into the gut microbiome, how it reacts to different foods and overall well-being. We learn about microbial diversity and its pivotal role in reducing inflammation.Dr. Will Bulsiewicz is board-certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology. He’s also a New York Times bestselling author. Dr. B has won multiple awards and distinctions for his work as a clinician. Prof. Tim Spector is a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London, director of the Twins UK study, Scientific co-founder at ZOE, and one of the world’s leading researchers. He's also the author of Food for Life, his latest book focusing on nutrition and health.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Top tips to control your gut from ZOE Science and Nutrition - Download our FREE gut guideFollow ZOE on InstagramAudio Timecodes:00:00  Introduction01:14    Quick Fire Questions03:27   What is Inflammation?07:40   Why is too much inflammation bad for you?09:06  This is at the core of most diseases…19:07    How blood sugar levels affect inflammation24:22   What is the role of Gut and the gut barrier?15:22 How does food affect inflammation?23:47    What is the role of Gut and the gut barrier?28:06   Gut microbes love good food!30:09   Inflammation and Gut Microbes: A two-way Street35:00   More plants and fermented food will reduce inflammation40:15    We need microbiome diversity45:45   Non-Dietary Approaches to Reduce Inflammation47:57    Benefits of Time-Restricted Eating52:01    SummaryMentioned in todays episode:Gut microbiota targeted diets modulate human immune status from CellThe Big IF Study: What did we find? From ZOEPREDICT: The world's largest in-depth nutritional research program from ZOEIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.

How to eat in 2024: 7 essential strategies

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 270 views
  • 3 months ago
  • 01:13:47

Happy New Year! Thinking about extreme dieting this January? Think again. There are easy ways to eat well and boost your immune system while still enjoying every mouthful. In today’s episode, Tim and Sarah break down seven essential strategies for eating healthily in 2024. They also debunk common misconceptions, emphasize the importance of food quality, and encourage you to focus on the sheer enjoyment of what you eat. Dr. Sarah Berry is an associate professor in the department of nutritional sciences at King's College London and chief scientist at ZOE. Prof. Tim Spector is one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists and scientific co-founder of ZOE.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow Tim on InstagramFollow Sarah on InstagramFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00    Introduction02:30     Why does what we eat matter?04:14    Are most people in the West eating well?05:45    What are the risk factors of a bad diet?07:20    Strategy #1: Food is more than fuel10:38    Food is an energy source for our gut microbes14:25    Strategy #2: Fat is not your enemy18:00    Breaking the low fat diet myth21:30    Strategy #3: Eat more Plants25:11    What are plant based foods?29:56    Strategy #4: Reduce ultra processed foods34:38     What are the food guidelines with ultra processed food?39:18    Strategy #5: Reduce your blood sugar spikes42:59    Which carbohydrates are healthy?52:00    Strategy #6: Eat fermented foods56:25    Do probiotics have the same effect as eating fermented foods?1:00:22 Strategy #7: Stick to an eating window1:08:43    SummaryMentioned in todays episode:The Big IF Study from ZOEIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here

Why unhealthy carbs are making you sick, and what to do about it

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 250 views
  • 4 months ago
  • 01:18:38

Do you realize how closely your diet affects your general health and well-being? Have you ever wondered how advertising affects what you eat? How much do you think your childhood diet is affecting your health in the long run?  In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Prof. Walter Willett to discuss the importance of carefully considering what you eat and making decisions that support your health.Professor Walter Willett, from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, is the world's most cited nutritional scientist — with over 2,000 publications and several books to his name. Prof. Willett has focused much of his work over the last 40 years on the development and evaluation of methods to study the effects of diet on the occurrence of major diseases. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00    Introduction01:42    Quickfire questions04:07    What is the average Western diet today?08:01    Why is so hard to get a straight answer on diet and disease?10:15    The latest understanding on the link between diet and disease14:31    Carbohydrates: distinguishing the beneficial from the detrimental17:47    The hidden truths behind refined starches and sugary beverages27:06    Diet is a public health issue32:18     How bad is red meat consumption and soy alternative?46:09    Exploring the impact of childhood dietary habits on lifelong health54:21    Is it too late to change what we eat and benefit from it?58:10    Walters view on the current American diet guildelines    1:05:15  What is the influence of vitamin supplements on sustaining peak vitality?1:09:13  How the traditional Mediterranean diet can prevent diseases    1:11:07   SummaryMentioned in today’s episode:Diet assessment methods in the Nurses' Health Studies and contribution to evidence-based nutritional policies and guidelines from the American Journal of Public healthDiet, lifestyle, and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes: A review from the Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study from Current Nutrition ReportsAssociation between healthy eating patterns and risk of cardiovascular disease from JAMA Internal Medicine The Mediterranean diet: Science and practice from Public Health NutritionBooks:

Could this diet solve your gut issues?

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 230 views
  • 4 months ago
  • 25:10

Do you know what FODMAPs are? Many of us aren’t aware of these cryptic carbohydrates hidden in everyday foods.How can undigested FODMAPs cause bloating, gas, and other symptoms as they ferment in your gut? In today’s episode, Dr. Will Bulsiewicz, ZOE’S U.S. medical director and a board-certified gastroenterologist, teaches us about FODMAPs and how to tell if a low-FODMAP diet could be right for you. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Mentioned in today’s episode:Nutritional, microbiological and psychosocial implications of the low FODMAP diet from Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyPersonal view: Food for thought — Western lifestyle and susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The FODMAP hypothesis from Alimentary Pharmacology & TherapeuticsLow fermentable, oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyol diet in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis from NutritionLow fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet improves symptoms in adults suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared to standard IBS diet: A meta-analysis of clinical studies from PLoS OneNutritional, microbiological and psychosocial implications of the low FODMAP diet from the Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyFollow ZOE on Instagram. Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 

How body fat impacts health and aging

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 350 views
  • 5 months ago
  • 55:18

As we age, the distribution of our body fat changes, particularly around menopause.  Most people think of body fat as bad, but fat tissue plays a number of hugely important roles in our health.In today’s episode of ZOE Science and Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Dr. Sarah Berry and Prof. Deborah Clegg. Together, they debunk the myth that fat is bad, enlighten us about why body fat is distributed where it is, and explore the differences in fat distribution between men and women. Deborah Clegg is a professor and Vice President for Research at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso. Her research focuses on sex differences in metabolism, adipose tissue, and the brain and the impact this has on our health. Dr. Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition. She has run more than 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Head to zoe.com/podcast if you want to uncover the right foods for your body and get 10% off your ZOE membership.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Intro04:00 What is body fat?06:32 What is healthy fat?07:52 Female vs male body fat11:56 Why is belly fat the most unhealthy?19:43 Waist to hip ratio21:24 How estrogen affects fat distribution27:41 Perimenopause symptoms31:01 Fat cells producing estrogen36:00 Hunger the menopause38:46 Weight gain and the menopause40:54 Physical changes in men42:28 Exercise and fat distribution 43:26 What to eat during menopause46:37 Estrogen supplementsMentioned in today’s episode: The evolutionary impact and influence of oestrogens on adipose tissue structure and function from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 2023Menopause is associated with postprandial metabolism, metabolic health and lifestyle: The ZOE PREDICT study from EBioMedicine 2022 Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 

Exercise myths busted: Practical steps to sustain your health

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 330 views
  • 5 months ago
  • 01:07:27

Admit it, exercise isn't everyone's favorite pastime. Of course, our ancestors weren't hitting the gym by choice — our evolution has wired us to stay active, and this natural activity actually slows down the aging process. The good news is that you can achieve the benefits without feeling like you're "exercising."In today’s episode, Prof. Daniel Lieberman debunks exercise myths. He also teaches us how exercise impacts our health and how learning from our evolution can unlock the secrets of a longer life.Daniel Lieberman is a paleoanthropologist at Harvard University. He’s the Edwin M. Lerner II Professor of Biological Sciences and a professor in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology. He’s best known for his research on the evolution of the human mind and the human body.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00     Introduction01:34    Quickfire questions03:22    The  Rudyard Kipling view of our ancestors04:54    Is exercise good for us and why do most of us hate it?06:19    For millions of years, people were physically active for 2 reasons only…15:38    Our bodies have evolved to save calroies and preserve energy18:31    It’s normal to think your life is normal22:27    We need to exercise because we don’t move enough!34:00   Diet, exercise and sleep can prevent these diseases…39:54    The active Grandparent hypothesis43:10    Study of men matriculating as undergraduates at Harvard University49:44    How can we enjoy keeping physically active?01:00:00   The importance of weights exercise01:06:43   SummaryMentioned in today’s episode: Three generations of HSPH researchers explore health benefits of exercise from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthStanford marshmallow test experiment, a summary from Simply PsychologyWe also mention Daniel’s book Exercised: The Science of Physical Activity, Rest and Health, and you can find it here.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 

We risked it all! Does ZOE work? Here's what our latest trial results show

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 350 views
  • 5 months ago
  • 01:03:19

We’ve been working for the past 2 years on a randomized controlled trial of ZOE membership. Participants used personalized nutrition advice to try to improve their health — and the results are fascinating. In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan, Sarah, and Tim ask: How did ZOE hold up as part of this trial?If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes01:03 - Quickfire round02:10 - Sarah’s first impression of Jonathan05:29 - What is an RCT10:20 - What is ZOE and how does it work14:14 - What did the RCT participants experience16:16 - Using cookies to measure blood sugar20:07 - What is blood fat25:02 - What happens once you’ve done your tests26:17 - Recent dietary changes Jonathan, Sarah and Tim have made34:52 - How are you guided through the ZOE program37:19 - Control group vs ZOE group41:23 - Results of the ZOE RCT45:03 - Do other wellness products have RCTs47:57 - Will the results be greater after a year of ZOE54:44 - Does the ZOE membership work57:02 - The difference between ZOE and other medical devices58:44 - Summary and outroIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover itDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Mentioned in today’s episode:Epidemiology of constipation in Europe and Oceania: A systematic review published in BMC Gastroenterology Recent advances in understanding and managing chronic constipation published in F1000ResearchHuman Postprandial Responses to Food and Potential for Precision Nutrition published in Nature MedicineMicrobiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals published in Nature MedicinePostprandial glycaemic dips predict appetite and energy intake in healthy individuals published in Nature MedicineEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.

How to prevent heart disease, according to science

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 270 views
  • 5 months ago
  • 55:21

Heart disease is among the top five causes of death globally, and it’s the first in the United States and United Kingdom. In the U.S., it causes 1 in 5 deaths.But what is heart disease, exactly? Can we take steps to avoid it? Prof. Eric Rimm, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is here to enlighten us. In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Eric explore what we can do to reduce our chances of getting heart disease. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram. Timecodes:00:15 - Intro01:07 - Quick fire questions02:10 - Biggest myth about Heart Disease03:2 6 - What is Heart Disease?08:03 - What is a stroke?10:29 - What are the differences in Heart Disease symptoms between men and women?12:51 - Did you know that…14:24 - The multi-decade diet study21:24 - The 4 ways to lower chances Heart Disease28:16 - Weight and Heart Disease32:09 - What can you do to reduce Heart Disease risk?34:30 - Exercise and Heart Disease risk37:11 - Body Weight and Heart Disease risk38:01 - Diet and Heart Disease risk41:06 - Sleep and Heart Disease risk46:18 - What is the cutting edge research in Heart Disease?49:35 - Summary53:18 -  ConclusionMentioned in today’s episode: Optimal dietary patterns for prevention of chronic disease from Nature MedicineFrequency, type, and volume of leisure-time physical activity and risk of coronary heart disease in young women from CirculationDiet, lifestyle, biomarkers, genetic factors, and risk of cardiovascular disease in the Nurses’ Health Studies from the American Journal of Public HealthDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.

The surprising truth about lectins

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 280 views
  • 5 months ago
  • 25:05

What are lectins, and are they dangerous? These “antinutrients” have come under attack and were recently the subject of a dietary fad fueled by a popular book. As always, there’s more to the story.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Dr. Will Bulsiewicz to dive deep into the world of lectins. They dissect questionable studies, debunk myths, and offer expert advice about how to approach foods containing these misunderstood compounds.Will is a board-certified gastroenterologist with 14 years of experience. He’s also the New York Times best-selling author of Fiber Fueled and ZOE’s U.S. medical director. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram.Mentioned in today’s episode:Lectins as bioactive plant proteins: A potential in cancer treatment from Critical Reviews in Food Science and NutritionPlant-derived lectins as potential cancer therapeutics and diagnostic tools from BioMed Research InternationalA legume-based hypocaloric diet reduces proinflammatory status and improves metabolic features in overweight/obese subjects from the European Journal of NutritionDietary legume consumption reduces risk of colorectal cancer: Evidence from a meta-analysis of cohort studies from Scientific ReportsIntake of legumes and cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis from Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesLegume consumption is inversely associated with type 2 diabetes incidence in adults: A prospective assessment from the PREDIMED study from Clinical NutritionThe effects of legume consumption on markers of glycaemic control in individuals with and without diabetes mellitus: A systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials from NutrientsEffects of dietary pulse consumption on body weight: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition The "white kidney bean incident" in Japan from Methods in Molecular BiologyFructan, rather than gluten, induces symptoms in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity from GastroenterologyIs there a...

Aging and longevity reimagined: Is mindfulness the secret?

ZOE Science & Nutrition

  • 270 views
  • 6 months ago
  • 56:16

Can the power of your thoughts help defy aging? Could your mind help improve your eyesight or even heal wounds faster? These ideas might seem far-fetched, but our guest, Harvard Professor Ellen Langer, has spent four decades uncovering the real science behind this.In this episode, discover how to harness your mind-body connection to enhance your well-being.Ellen Langer is an American professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1981, she became the first woman ever to be tenured in psychology at Harvard. Prof. Langer studies the illusion of control, decision-making, aging, and mindfulness theory.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:48    Quickfire questions04:34    The mind and body should be understood as one unit05:42 The counterclockwise study06:51 Chambermaid exercise study09:33    What is Mindfulness?10:59 All of the misery we experience is a function of our mindlessness14:47    Mindful optimism23:12    Everything should be different, every day of your life25:33    How Ellen approaches a simple eyesight test    28:21 We have more control over our health and lives than we think…33:35    Placebos could be our strongest medicines…39:00    Blood sugar study results44:50    How to approach mindfulness54:05    SummaryMentioned in today’s episode: Ageing as a mindset: A counterclockwise experiment to rejuvenate older adults sponsored by Catholic University of the Sacred HeartMind-set matters: Exercise and the placebo effect from Psychological ScienceThe Mindful Body and Mindfulness, two books by Prof. LangerEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.